Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the society.

Photo

Sugar Cane syrup


  • Please log in to reply
125 replies to this topic

#91 CathyL

CathyL
  • legacy participant
  • 1,052 posts

Posted 14 January 2003 - 03:17 PM

Stella, they sound scrumptious. I love shortbread. Thanks for posting the recipe.

#92 Suzanne F

Suzanne F
  • legacy participant
  • 7,398 posts
  • Location:NY, NY

Posted 14 January 2003 - 03:19 PM

Shortbreads are such great (and EASY!) cookies. Thanks.

Question: my plain CI skillet is biggish -- 12 inches. I'm thinking I could use my 10-inch CI grill pan, and that way I'd have pre-marked the shortbread for cutting. Do you think that would work all right? Or would it bake unevenly?

#93 laura

laura
  • legacy participant
  • 109 posts

Posted 14 January 2003 - 08:26 PM

StellaBella, You know I love buttery cookies and this recipe sounds great, I can't wait to get out my
cast iron skillet.

#94 Suvir Saran

Suvir Saran
  • legacy participant
  • 4,877 posts

Posted 15 January 2003 - 12:27 AM

Thanks Stellabella!
What size Cast Iron skillet did you use?

I feel like making them now (2:28 AM, EST).. but will bake a pistachio cake instead.
I have no desire to sleep. I shall bake and hopefully not tease my own SO and the neighbors with smells. :rolleyes:

#95 Stargryphon

Stargryphon
  • legacy participant
  • 10 posts
  • Location:Stockbridge, GA

Posted 17 January 2003 - 07:20 PM

Having just recently succeded, (with a lot of help from some of you out there), in making a good loaf of sourdough. I am now looking for a good, simple recipe for sourdough cinnamon rolls.

Thanks in advance. :smile:

#96 nightscotsman

nightscotsman
  • participating member
  • 3,068 posts
  • Location:Las Vegas

Posted 17 January 2003 - 08:46 PM

I don't have a cinnamon roll recipe, but you might try sourdough pancakes or waffles.

#97 Stargryphon

Stargryphon
  • legacy participant
  • 10 posts
  • Location:Stockbridge, GA

Posted 17 January 2003 - 09:05 PM

In fact, I have a recipe for sourdough starter pancakes that I like to use. My son loves them so they must be ok. :smile:

Waffles do sound good though.

#98 Jaymes

Jaymes
  • participating member
  • 7,451 posts
  • Location:Houston, Texas

Posted 17 January 2003 - 09:08 PM

Hoping you get a sourdough cinnamon roll recipe.

I agree with the sourdough pancake people. The best. And, sourdough with whole wheat flour. Or buckwheat. Extra yum.

Would you like one for sourdough fruitcake??? If so, I can help there!!
"And you, you're just a stinker."

#99 Stargryphon

Stargryphon
  • legacy participant
  • 10 posts
  • Location:Stockbridge, GA

Posted 17 January 2003 - 09:46 PM

I've never heard of a sourdough fruitcake. Sounds interesting.

#100 Jaymes

Jaymes
  • participating member
  • 7,451 posts
  • Location:Houston, Texas

Posted 17 January 2003 - 10:03 PM

I've never heard of a sourdough fruitcake. Sounds interesting.

Sourdough Fruitcake

1 1/2 C raisins
1 1/2 C currants
3 C mixed candied fruits, or peels, or dates, figs, etc.
1 C hard cider (or sherry, port, rum, Muscatel or brandy)
1 C sugar
1 C brown sugar
2/3 C shortening (I use buttery-flavor Crisco)
1 1/2 t cinnamon
1 t nutmeg
1/2 t allspice
2 eggs, beaten
1 C sourdough starter
1 C sliced almonds (or chopped pecans)
4 C sifted AP flour
1 t baking soda
2 t salt

Rinse, drain, coarsely chop raisins; rinse, drain and pick over currants; chop fruits and peels. Combine all fruits with cider (or wine or brandy or whatever). Cover and let stand overnight. Cream together the shortening and spices until fluffy. Beat in eggs. Stir in starter. Combine with fruit mixture and nuts. Sift flour, soda and salt together into batter and mix well. Turn into two loaf pans that have been greased and lined with heavy brown paper. Bake below oven center in very slow oven (275º) about 2 1/2 hours. Remove from pans. Cool on wire racks before turning out and removing paper. Spoon additional 2 or 3 T wine or cider over each cooled loaf before storing. Wrap in foil and refrigerate. These will mellow day by day.



Bonus recipe:

Sourdough Biscuits

1 C. AP flour
1 1/2 t baking powder
1/4 t salt
1 T sugar
1/2 t baking soda
1 C starter
1/2 C shortening

Combine all ingredients, starting with dry ingredients, and knead on a floured board or pastry cloth 10 times. Pat out to 3/4" thick. Cut out biscuits, either round with top of glass, or (easier) just make square biscuits. Place in greased pie pan and bake 425º for 15-18 minutes.

Makes 8 large biscuits.
"And you, you're just a stinker."

#101 maggiethecat

maggiethecat
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,053 posts
  • Location:Chicago Burbs -- West

Posted 17 January 2003 - 10:12 PM

Jaymes:

Girlfriend, I have already gained three inches simply reading your recipies. Will run around the block twenty times, print them out, and bake.

Thanks.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."
Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com


#102 Stargryphon

Stargryphon
  • legacy participant
  • 10 posts
  • Location:Stockbridge, GA

Posted 18 January 2003 - 11:17 AM

My wife has reached the point of threatening me to stop making sourdough English muffins. She loves them and accuses me of being responsible for ruining her attempts to lose weight. :biggrin:

(Come to think of it, I should threaten myself to stop as well!)

Jaymes, thanks for the recipes!

Edited by Stargryphon, 18 January 2003 - 11:19 AM.


#103 chefette

chefette
  • participating member
  • 854 posts

Posted 18 January 2003 - 12:39 PM

This snippet is not actually about the $50,000 Pastry Challeng, but the World Cup Pastry Competition where the US WON!!!!!!!

http://www.frolicand...ves/000035.html
"But the Pastry Cup is particularly tense and stressful. I've already seen Greece's ice sculpture collapse right on top of its climactic dessert. Oops. Holland had the same problem. Most surprisingly, the United States actually won. First our surprisingly non-sucky World Cup showing, and now this! (Which is not to say this is necessarily recent, but everything on the Food Network is timeless.) It does appear that the US team was made up in part of ringers -- they work in the US, but two out of three are French. The INS will probably come and grab them now that they've served their purpose." Read more...

I think this is my favorite paragraph and really tells it like it is IMHO

"You don't get to watch them stirring and whipping and pushing perfectly formed ovals of sponge cake into twee little molds. No, what the audience sees is primarily the sneering and the eating -- the judging portion of the competition. They see the chefs bring out the three-foot-tall chocolate cake with its majestic red blown-sugar flourish on top and parade it in front of the judges, who make faces like it smells like feet. Some of the judges take pictures. They take little bites. They never make that "Ohgodohgodohgod" face that I make when I eat a really good chocolate cake, either. They look unimpressed. "Good, but not as good as what I fed to the Empress last Wednesday."

Edited by chefette, 18 January 2003 - 12:44 PM.


#104 Robert Schonfeld

Robert Schonfeld
  • participating member
  • 802 posts

Posted 18 January 2003 - 03:07 PM

Just about any recipe can be converted to sourdough by substituting the amount of flour and water in an appropriate amount of starter (20 - 40% of the total weight of the dough, depending on temperature and some other factors) for those same amounts in the non-sourdough recipe.
Who said "There are no three star restaurants, only three star meals"?

#105 Suzi Edwards

Suzi Edwards
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 1,608 posts
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 19 January 2003 - 11:47 AM

OK. I've just made some pastry and it has ended up looking like crumbs. I used my magimix and did the following:

1. creamed 175g of butter with 50g of caster sugar
2. added an egg yolk
3. slowly added 270g of plain flour

the recipe said not to overwork the pastry and it wasn't balling together (as suggested in the recipe) i kind of squidged it together and popped it into the fridge.

It wouldn't really roll out and when i did get it to roll out, it was impossible to lift up and line the tin.

So what did I do wrong? Please tell me there was something wrong with the recipe. I've never had any problems before.
Suzi Edwards aka "Tarka"

"the only thing larger than her bum is her ego"

Blogito ergo sum

#106 chefette

chefette
  • participating member
  • 854 posts

Posted 19 January 2003 - 04:38 PM

It sounds like there just wasn't enough moisture. Are you sure you weren't supposed to add the whole egg? did you try adding just a tsp or so of water?

#107 Steve Klc

Steve Klc
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,739 posts
  • Location:Washington, DC mostly

Posted 19 January 2003 - 04:46 PM

Tarka--was your butter hard or soft when you started? Is plain flour AP flour?

It would also help if you told us where this recipe is from--author and title please, even a link if it is on the web. A trick, too, in rolling out crumbly doughs--roll them out in between two pieces of plastic wrap--lift them up and drape over your tart tin--peel one side off--flip over--peel the other side off--and then press gently in place.

What's a Magimix--is that a UK brand and a version of a stand mixer? See I'm guessing UK because all your amounts are in weight. Did you use the "paddle"? Sometimes it also helps to give a final push or schmear together on the countertop before wrapping and refrigerating.

And when you say you never had any problems before--was that with this recipe, the Magimix or other doughs you've made in the Magimix?
Steve Klc

Pastry chef-Restaurant Consultant
Oyamel : Zaytinya : Cafe Atlantico : Jaleo

chef@pastryarts.com

#108 elyse

elyse
  • legacy participant
  • 4,861 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 19 January 2003 - 05:38 PM

Isn't shortbread just butter, sugar, and flour? I'm certainly no expert, but couldn't it just have been too cold, possibly?

#109 chefette

chefette
  • participating member
  • 854 posts

Posted 19 January 2003 - 07:51 PM

It sounds as though you are looking for something specific. What is it? Or are you just making a collection?

#110 elyse

elyse
  • legacy participant
  • 4,861 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 20 January 2003 - 07:03 AM

Well, I'm remembering some savory dishes as well, so that may be why they're not at the tips of your floury fingertips. I'll try looking in my IHMRS bin to look for specific notes. May take a few days.

Thanks!

#111 chefette

chefette
  • participating member
  • 854 posts

Posted 20 January 2003 - 08:29 AM

The savory portion of the program was not at all connected to eGullet. Steve Klc, one of the moderators here coordinated the entire pastry program for the Societe and the IHMRS so that is why he asked us to make the pastry components available here.

#112 Ed Hamilton

Ed Hamilton
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 961 posts
  • Location:sailing yacht Triton

Posted 20 January 2003 - 11:58 AM

I ran across a bottle of this near Boston in October and noticed that it says "Simple Syrup" on the bottom of the label. What I'm looking for in the US is real sugar cane syrup. I brought some back from Martinique and haven't found anything like it in the states.
Edward Hamilton


Ministry of Rum.com
The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

#113 Dave the Cook

Dave the Cook

    Executive Director

  • manager
  • 7,369 posts
  • Location:Atlanta

Posted 20 January 2003 - 01:11 PM

Ed:

Three possibilities:

Refiner's syrup, which is a liquid byproduct of the refining process. It's light in color, and is used in lots of baked goods. More here.

Perhaps we're all being misled by the idea of "syrup," which is a refined product (it's usually a thin liquid that's cooked down). Maybe what you're looking for is cane juice?

Finally, there is a product called evaporated cane juice that is available through health food stores. It's sold as dry crystals, but presumably could be reconstituted. I had a link, but can't find it now. Let me know if you're interested, and I'll look some more.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.


#114 Lesley C

Lesley C
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,548 posts
  • Location:Montreal

Posted 20 January 2003 - 02:57 PM

Steve, a magimix is what we call a cuisinart or robocoupe.
I've been making doughs this week and I find them all too dry. But I'm up in cold, dry Canada so I need to add a bit more water.
If you're making a pate sucree like this, it should smear together nicely before refrigeration ( a technique called "fraser" or "fraiser").
If not, turn the dough out onto to counter and sprinkle over a tablespoon (or 1 1/2) of cold water. But be careful, too much water will toughen the dough.

#115 elyse

elyse
  • legacy participant
  • 4,861 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 20 January 2003 - 03:55 PM

There we go.

#116 Marlene

Marlene
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 8,123 posts
  • Location:Alberta, Canada

Posted 21 January 2003 - 06:15 AM

I couldn't decide whether this belonged in the Beer Forum, the baking forum or the Cooking Forum! I just received the quarterly edition of Food and Drink, an Ontario publication put out by our Liquour Control Board. In it, they have a recipe for chcolate cheesecake, and one of the ingredients is Porter beer. I've never heard of beer being used in a cheesecake recipe before. Anyone else? (Although the picture looks yummy!) :smile:
Marlene
cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

#117 Miss J

Miss J
  • legacy participant
  • 1,107 posts

Posted 21 January 2003 - 07:04 AM

Interesting - do they specify any particular porter?

#118 Marlene

Marlene
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 8,123 posts
  • Location:Alberta, Canada

Posted 21 January 2003 - 07:08 AM

They suggest Hales, or even Rogue Chocolate Stout or St. Peter's Cream Stout. They say whatever you use, make sure it's a full bodied and roundly malty beer.? :unsure:
Marlene
cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

#119 Miss J

Miss J
  • legacy participant
  • 1,107 posts

Posted 21 January 2003 - 07:20 AM

I think it would be interesting to try. I know people who like eating dark chocolate with porter or stout, although I've not seen it actually used in a chocolate dessert before. Could be worth a try. I imagine that you'd REALLY want a harmoniously nutty/sweetish porter or stout, though.

A bit about porters from Beer Advocat:

"Modern-day Porters are typically brewed using a pale malt base with the addition of black malt, crystal, chocolate or smoked brown malt. The addition of roasted malt is uncommon, but used occasionally. Some brewers will also age their beers after inoculation with live bacteria to create an authentic taste. Hop bitterness is moderate on the whole and colour ranges from brown to black. Overall they remain very complex and interesting beers."

The rest of the article is here.

#120 Marlene

Marlene
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 8,123 posts
  • Location:Alberta, Canada

Posted 21 January 2003 - 07:27 AM

I'll make this in the next day or two and report back.
Marlene
cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.