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radtek

[How] Do You Garnish Your Hot Dog?

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radtek,

 

Absolutely, the open slit cheese side should be grilled last. I forgot to mention it in my initial from memory posting of the recipe. You want to minimize the oozing out of the cheese, but some is going to occur anyway, and that toasty grilled cheese is A-okay, but I recommend doing this in a non-stick skillet or griddle pan.

 

Also I modify the recipe to use 1-1/2 slices of bacon for wrapping, and that takes it all the way to both ends of the dog, and if you wrap carefully, with no gaps, that is going to minimize oozing too.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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When I was a kid, my mom would make cheese dogs (hot dogs slit from one end to the other...the slit making a pocket yet not deep enough to be able to split the dog open in half). Then she would slice some cheddar cheese into small sticks and stuff them into the slit in the hot dogs. She'd use the broiler in the oven to cook the dogs and melt the cheese. Good stuff, Maynard. :laugh:

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Tim Oliver

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Usually called Texas Weiner sauce here in northwest NJ.  It is bottled and sold at many of the Greek run diners up here so perhaps his name for it .......?

 

Toasted bun, hot dog mustard, shredded cheese , THEN the grilled dog and a line of ketchup (my new favorite is the French's that just came out).  Also, if I can find them, the Park's finest from Ballpark are really tasty.

Ah. The guy who gave me the recipe is from New Jersey so I'm confident that his reference was the same as your description.

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One piece of bacon, some gouda and a bun sized dog. Except I used a hoagie bun. I froze the bacon wrapped dog for about 40 minutes before introducing it to the pan.

 

Served with spicy mustard and Bavarian sauerkraut.

 

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I think prepping the wrapped dogs and freezing them in advance would make this a tasty and quick meal.

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By the by....if you haven't tried Johsonville Smoked Brats (the pre-cooked type only), you're really missing out.

I love them!!!  A nice soft bun, some minced onion and a shmear of mustard is heaven to me.

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For dinner tonight Im having a bag of frozen broccoli and 2 hot dogs, no bun, slathered in ketchup.

:biggrin:

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Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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No dogs planned for tonight, but I am reminded a couple nights ago it was sauerkraut and yellow mustard.  Sorry for the late report.

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Today – Dietz & Watson natural casing beef dogs, "dirty water" style; brioche buns slathered on each side with coarse-ground mustard containing jalapeños, dog nestled in bun, topped w/ Kühne Barrel Sauerkraut straight from the bottle (with juices).  Pickled scallion bulbs (rakkyo) (Allium chinense) [Nishimoto Trading], trimmed standard green onions/scallions .

 

DSCN5390a_800.jpg

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If I could have a hot dog that's as nice as that one (and with the proper condiments such as mustard and sauerkraut) PLUS a large papaya juice from Papaya King I would be awfully happy.

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Hebrew National beef franks/hot dogs – garnished with broccoli, yard-long beans, garlic, ho fan, "chicken-abalone" flavored broth, deep-fried shallots.  See here.

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I got that craving today - my once or twice a year. -just standard buns and dog. Did with onion, sweet relish and ballpark mustard - bun bit  toasted in toaster oven. When I googled  this older topic on the societal aspects of hot dogs came up,  If you have never read it - wow there was some interesting conversation. Anyone have new favorites? 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/81592-the-semiotics-of-the-hot-dog/

 

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Thanks for the link.  Fun to read and I miss those folks, too.  We are hot dog lovers in this family.  I grew up loving them.  None of my English step siblings nor my stepdad, @Ted Fairhead liked them at ALL, so Momma and I would sneak off on a Saturday and devour some dogs for lunch.  I love everything from a boiled dog with nothing but mustard to "Beanie Wienie" to a fully dressed Carolina dog (mustard, chili and slaw).  No peppers of any kind or raw onions.  I try to keep a package of Kirkland's dogs in the freezer at all times, but the dogs I really like are the ones with casing.  

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A "hot dog" is an option for lunch at our Sunday flea market.    Mohamed runs a meticulous cart and loads every order precisely.    Husband goes for the Polish dog, I the turkey dog.    I ask for catsup, mustard, mayo, lettuce, tomato, red onion, cilantro, dill pickles and loads of jalapenos.    Husband similar but no peppers.     Mohamed jokes as we approach, "One spicy turkey dog for Madam, and one no peppers for the Wimp."    He then cackles at his joke as he sets to putting them together.

 

Mine:     $3.   

2045317332_ScreenShot2020-02-10at8_13_12PM.png.e041c5de5f902a5ff7019b566a4e8adc.png

 

Husband's Polish:  $4.

 

There is so much salad to one of these that I have occasionally ordered one "without a dog", which confounds Mohamed.    It is a delicious sandwich even without the sausage.


Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)
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eGullet member #80.

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I think it is like pizza - a core food.  My favorite was from a street cart outside the Bank of America where I went back in the day when you got checks in the mail. A biggy would come from someone like CBRE so I'd zip over and then treat myself. Almost like flat top griddle with the dog, bun, onions, bacon, serrano chili and then dressed as you wanted - full on was mayo, relish, catsup, mustard. So so satisfying. 

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6 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

There is so much salad to one of these that I have occasionally ordered one "without a dog",

The only way to enjoy this non-food.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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The basics for me are sauerkraut, (that I squeeze all the juice out of), Dijon and ketchup.  Sometimes dill relish, but I've always thought about those garnishes I see on Chicago dogs.

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Pan toasted kraut, yellow mustard is all for me

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Chopped red onion and ball park mustard on a butter toasted bun (or steamed in the CSO).

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Mustard and sweet relish. And the dog must be grilled.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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For me, it's mustard (grainy or Dijon), plus kraut if I've got it. Sometimes coleslaw, in the absence of kraut. Fried onions if I have them to hand, or if I'm doing dogs for a group (won't bother, for just me). Split-top bun, buttered and grilled.

 

Usually I only have them when I've opened a pack during a grandkid visit, and then have a few left over to use up.

 

 

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Pan toasted bun, mustard, dill relish/pickle and onions.

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Mustard and mayo.

 

Or if I'm feeling fancy, Japanese-style - tonkatsu sauce, kewpie mayo, dried bonito flakes, nori, green onions.

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Bonito flakes! They crack me up when they fly

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Cheese, mustard (mostly yellow although sometimes Dijon), sometimes relish all on a grilled New England style hot dog roll.

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6 minutes ago, dans said:

Cheese, mustard (mostly yellow although sometimes Dijon), sometimes relish all on a grilled New England style hot dog roll.

 

Cheese as in cold shredded or? I   grew up with cold shredded cheese on hard shell tacos which I still can not do. I know it is popular. Just curious,

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