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kayb

society donor
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Everything posted by kayb

  1. Nothing, other than the fact it has to do with sorghum molasses. Just one of my mutitude of flights of digression. Oh, look! A squirrel!
  2. kayb

    Dinner 2018 (Part 1)

    Appreciate that. Unfortunately, I'll be trying to outrace the rain that comes with it this weekend. Headed to E. Tennessee for a funeral. Hopefully it'll still be cool into next week. Did you send tacos, too?
  3. The spiced wafers. Gingersnaps. Molasses spice cookies. Whatever they are.
  4. kayb

    Creamy Shrimp (Low Carb)

    Ooohhh. Sounds good.
  5. Going to make these soon as the new sorghum comes out of the mills. Likely next month. For those who don't live close to the source, "new sorghum" has a distinctly different taste from sorghum molasses after it ages a few weeks. Very bright and almost citrusy. It was always an occasion when one could get the first "new sorghum" of the year (they'd announce it on the news on the local radio station. Major big deal), and I knew what dinner would be that night. Country bacon, crackling cornbread, canned tomatoes and new sorghum. And there was a very specific way to eat it. One put a couple of tablespoons of butter on one's plate, poured a similar amount of sorghum over it, and mixed the two with the blade of a knife. Then one spread dollops of it on the cornbread, a bite at a time. (I always dipped my bacon in it, too. The tomatoes were a nod to having a vegetable on the table, and served to cut the richness of the other items, as well.
  6. Please do post your father's recipe for goulash. I enjoy paprikash, and would love to branch out!
  7. I have come to love curries, both the Indian and the Thai variety. The local Thai place does a mango curry you can get with either chicken or shrimp that is to die for. I'm fond of coconut curries on all kinds of seafood. Still pretty much a rookie at making my own, but I do enjoy trying. I insist on cooking jasmine rice with my Thai curries, basmati and naan with my Indian ones.
  8. kayb

    Oreo Cookies

    Get thee behind me, Satan!
  9. kayb

    Oreo Cookies

    @Kim Shook -- I blame you for this. Well, you and the fact I went to the grocery while hungry, someone one Should Not Do. I am, for the evening, the proud owner of a bag of Lemon Oreo Thins. I do not expect them to last the night. Thankfully the package is small.
  10. kayb

    Lunch! What'd ya have? (2018)

    I could get behind a pork chop sandwich. I love most anything one can do with a pork chop. Could give up beef a lot a lot quicker than I could pork!
  11. kayb

    Dinner 2018 (Part 1)

    It's only a frozen pizza from Aldi's, but I got to use my brand new peel!
  12. Had to get that. The author is obviously Methodist.
  13. The blueberry barbecue sauce rocks a pork steak, too. Just sayin'.
  14. Had to spring for Milk Street and the casserole. I'm southern and Methodist. Casseroles are in my blood. (I am convinced it's part of the Methodist Discipline that one must own a 9 x 13 pan. I'm quite sure John Wesley said so.)
  15. kayb

    Lunch! What'd ya have? (2018)

    Yep. Fine, fine stuff.
  16. kayb

    Lunch! What'd ya have? (2018)

    Re: fried bologna. A slab of fried bologna, nearly charred around the edges, on two pieces of of mustard-slathered Wonder bread (or Sunbeam), with dill pickle chips and a slice of American cheese? Food of the gods. A thick slab of bologna on the grill, painted with a thin coat of barbecue sauce, ain't half bad, either.
  17. Don't vac-pack a cat or Chum. Or Ronnie! Envious.
  18. Welcome, Bernie. You're in the right place. Many SV'ers in here (me included) and many of them experts at it (me NOT included). Chef Steps is a good resource, too! What do you like to SV? Or cook, otherwise?
  19. kayb

    Lunch! What'd ya have? (2018)

    The casserole doesn't have a strong eggplant taste, but then, eggplant doesn't have a strong eggplant taste. I knew it had cracker crumbs and cheese, and made an educuated guess as to milk. It has a buttery flavor, too, and a crumb-and-cheese topping. In yesterday's iteration, I roasted five small-medium globe eggplants for 40 minutes at 400F in the CSO on steam-bake. Let them cool, halved them and scooped out the flesh; it made about 2 1/2 cups when lightly mashed up. Stirred in two beaten eggs, about four ounces of grated co-jack cheese, a quarter-cup or so of half and half, and about 2/3 of a sleeve of Ritz crackers, crushed into crumbs. Stirred that up and smoothed it out in a deep-dish pie plate. Topping was the rest of the sleeve of crushed Ritz, and about another 2 ounces of grated cheese. Baked at 350, steam bake, 30 minutes in the CSO. It was close. Real close. Could have been a little saltier; I didn't salt, as both the cheese and the crackers are fairly salty. I might use grated Velveeta next time, and I think the topping would benefit from grated Parm. There was too much topping; I needed about half as much. I might add some melted butter next time. And it would have benefitted from some black pepper. Other than that, it was pretty much spot on. Thd other eggplant treatment I really love is to take cubes of eggplant, toss them in a mixture of honey and miso, and roast them. Yumm-O!
  20. kayb

    Lunch! What'd ya have? (2018)

    Still lots of veggies at the Farmers' Market, so lunch was veggie-centric today. Corn (from the freezer, and I very nearly scorched it, but the browned bits ARE tasty!), green beans with ham that had been vac-packed and frozen since Easter; and eggplant casserole, along with cornbread. I am coming closer and closer to nailing the eggplant casserole recipe from one of my favorite restaurants, The Cupboard in Memphis, where I've been eating since 1977 and have yet to try an entree or a sandwich; that's 40 years of vegetable plates. A classic case of "it ain't broke, so don't fix it."
  21. kayb

    Aldi

    I buy all my milk, half-and-half, cream and butter at Aldi; generally MUCH cheaper than Kroger (including butter, a buck a pound cheaper; half-and-half is comparably cheaper, whole milk close to the same. I find mushrooms at a good price there, consistently. Supermarket cheese is significantly cheaper, as is orange juice frozen concentrate. Bread has a tendency not to be fresh. Produce is fairly consistently a good deal.
  22. It IS tough to let it go, @Smithy, but I won't ever move back up there, and I don't want to see the house set empty or fool with leasing it and the attendant headaches that brings. Selling it is the smart thing to do, but I will admit to being sentimental about my home for the first 18 years of my life. But it'll make a good home for someone who wants a little land outside of town, and I actually have a cousin who's interested in it, which would be nice because it would still be in the family. Be assured when I light somewhere -- to avoid the tax hit, I plan to take what I get out of that place and put it into a new home here in Jonesboro -- one of the first things I plan to do is plant some fruit trees. One will be a pineapple pear. I tried preserves last year with Bartletts from the market, and they're but a pale imitation of the real thing.
  23. Bear with me. Long post coming up. I'm getting ready to sell my parents' "home place" up in West Tennessee, if I can bear to do so. So I gathered up my brood of children and grandchildren to go up there, spend a night, and make up our minds what we wanted out of the place. One thing I knew I wanted was pears. There's a wonderful old pear tree, probably 50+ years old, down by what was once the garden. It's a pineapple pear, and the hard, dry fruit makes the best pear preserves known to modern man. My father ate them with his scrambled eggs for breakfast every day of his life except Sunday, when breakfast was cereal. And pear preserves with scrambled eggs, bacon and a biscuit is a breakfast I'll still choose above all others. So I dispatched the Thundering Herd out to pick pears. ars The old tree only bears about once every three years now. This year, it was loaded. I brought home about 30 pounds of pears. em This is about half of them. Lucy was unimpressed. Peeled, sliced and sugared a Dutch oven and a stock pot full and set them to simmering. A cup of sugar to a pound of pear slices. A quarter-cup of water per pot. That's it. th After about three hours at a low simmer, they're a beautiful reddish brown, and ready to can. I canned eight pints. Still got a bucket of pears to go. Will be back up there in two weeks, and will get more pears then. y They taste like home. And I plan on making enough to last me for a long, long time.
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