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kayb

society donor
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Everything posted by kayb

  1. kayb

    Breakfast 2020!

    The very best waffles I have ever had in my life are these yeast waffles whose recipe, I think, came from the booklet that used to come with the Waring wafflemakers. I let mine go through two cycles of red light/green light so's to get them plenty crisp on the outside. Inside, they're mostly air with a few wisps of dough around it. I used to halve the recipe, but since acquiring the CSO, I've found you can freeze and reheat them pretty successfully. Sadly, I can eat them only very rarely since the celiac diagnosis.
  2. My garden is not nearly as expansive as Shelby's, but it's coming along. I was repotting herbs today until a sudden shower ran me in off the porch. Will get back to that later, hopefully, if it lets up, and then tomorrow's project is to build a plant stand for the herb pots. Meanwhile, here are the raised beds: Tomatoes are thriving. I have several blooms. Green beans are looking healthy. Upside down tomato cages sub for poles for these to run on. Watermelon, canteloupe, cucumber, zucchini. Got flowers on the crookneck squash.
  3. kayb

    Dinner 2020

    @Kim Shook -- I am so very sorry to hear of your mom's passing. It is never an easy thing, whether we lose them in the prime of life or after a long illness. May God's grace comfort you, Mr. Kim and Jessica.
  4. I've never dealt with baking anything in copper before, but it would seem to me the best way to clean them would be just to fill them with water and let them soak. Like Rotuts, I can't fathom baking anything that size for an hour and 3/4 at 400F.
  5. kayb

    Dinner 2020

    But damn, that'd be a great name!
  6. Maybe plastic wrap/waxed paper and a rolling pin?
  7. I've been through all but one serving of the two quarts I macerated. Finished off one of the pound cakes. The other quart is in the fridge, and Child A has been dredging them in sour cream and then dipping in brown sugar.
  8. @robirdstx -- have you tried GrillGrates? They make a big difference for me in things not sticking to the grill. Pricy, but I guess they last forever.
  9. Beautiful! When we used to do whole shoulders, we'd put them on the pit at 6 p.m. in order to eat at noon or shortly thereafter the next day. It required a house party so there'd be shifts of folks to stay up with it and turn it hourly. We'd also baste with a vinegar-based barbecue sauce. Rather than temping the meat, we had a thermometer in the lid of the pit (my father was a welder and could make anything -- including the pit and lid, out of galvanized metal; pit had an open bottom so coals were on the ground). We'd do the first three hours at 175, the next six at 200, and then finishing at 225 for three more and 250 for two after that. Produced perfect shoulders. I still have the lid to the pit; the bottom rusted out long ago. But concrete blocks make a serviceable one. It'll hold four shoulders; very rarely do I have the occasion to cook that many any more.
  10. kayb

    Dinner 2020

    I think my favorite treatment of new potatoes is to put them in the CSO tray, lay the rack on top of them, and bake chicken or pork chops. I could eat a bajillion of 'em.
  11. kayb

    Dinner 2020

    Have to confess I'd never thought of frying onions with the addition of clove. And raisins. Pass on the raisins, but I'm intrigued by the clove notion. I have added a bit of sugar before, but never vinegar.
  12. Here's mine from today. Pound cake on the bottom. Quartered strawberries macerated in sugar alone. Topping is, sadly (🥵) Cool Whip, as I had no cream beyond half and half.
  13. Bumping up an old topic here, because, well, it's that time of year, at least in the Middle South. As I made pound cakes to serve as the base for strawberry shortcake, I was thinking about the different iterations of strawberry shortcake I've had, and wondering what the phrase denotes in other parts of the world. When I was a kid, we were of the sponge cake school of shortcake base. Berries capped, quartered or halved, macerated in a little sugar, heaped onto the sponge cake, topped with whipped cream (or more likely, Cool Whip). When I moved to Arkansas, I found most folks who made their own shortcake made either a true shortcake cookie-ish base, or used simple piecrust. There's a regional restaurant in the heart of a big strawberry-growing area that is a destination in the spring for its strawberry shortcake, which consists of soft-serve ice cream, topped with macerated strawberries and surrounded by wedges of pie crust that have been cut, sprinkled with granulated sugar, and baked. I had a friend (from up north, on the PA-NY state line) who contended proper shortcake was something like a biscuit, but sweetened. Never could get on board with that one. I've also known people who swore the only proper base for shortcake was angel food cake. And somewhere, I hit on the notion of using pound cake as the base, and that's where I've stuck. It's fairly easy and quick to stir one up, and I almost always have the stuff on hand. I bake my recipe in a pair of 8 x 3.5 loaf pans, instead of a Bundt or tube pan, because that way I can freeze one. It's only mildly sweet, and it's a neutral canvas to best display the berries in their spring goodness. Plus it's wonderful at soaking up the juices. What's underneath all the goodness in your strawberry shortcake? Any special tricks to macerating your berries, or just sugar? I will usually add a splash of white balsamic vinegar, if I have it on hand, and I had a friend who swore by cracked pepper along with the sugar. Whipped cream, creme fraiche, Cool Whip, or just naked? I lean toward barely sweetened creme fraiche. And later in the year, do you make them with any other fruit? I often use fresh peaches once the strawberries are gone. Let's hear about, and see, your shortcakes!
  14. That was worth it just for "Carbohydrate Camelot." Thanks.
  15. I don't eat much toast. And when I do, I want it fairly lightly toasted, so drying out the inside isn't a huge issue for me. You're pushing me toward the Blumlein.
  16. kayb

    Lunch 2020

    Lunch in the spring of coronavirus. Seconds may be required.
  17. My white kitchen is the first time I've ever had white cabinets -- well, except when I was a kid, and that doesn't count. We have granite tops, light gray walls, and a wood-look ceramic tile floor in a sort of pickled gray. I'm contemplating replacing the kitchen island I bought when we moved in with a larger one. Child A, whom I usually trust in matters of decorating, wants to do it in dark gray. Nope. We're staying white. I love it. To prep for painting, I'd clean with some sort of acid-based cleaner (maybe even vinegar and water) to cut the grease, etc., that settles on them. Then rough up just a little with sandpaper, and then paint with high-gloss enamel. I've seen cabinets done with boat deck enamel that were gorgeous. Automotive enamel would be, as well (have seen furniture pieces done in that). But a good high-gloss indoor-outdoor enamel from the local paint or hardware store will work just fine.
  18. kayb

    Breakfast 2020!

    Oops, sorry, @blue_dolphin. I think I credited the wrong poster.
  19. Had the following email from Darto today. It's in Spanish, but Google Translate does a handy job on it. "This Monday, May 25, starting at 10 in the morning, we are going to put on sale a litter of second-selection products that include varied quantities of all our models of pans and paellas. Second choice means that it has marks or scratches or small deformation that do not make the product function and are only aesthetic details. We will sell only through our website and with the option of home delivery. Due to the current situation, it will not be possible to withdraw through the premises. The products will be published at half price starting at 10 in the morning of this Monday, May 25, and they will be delivered from July 15. They are several units and the packaging and shipping take a long time and even more in these circumstances that we are all experiencing. Most of the products will surely be delivered before the 15th of July except for the orders that include models of frying pan or paella n.27. The boxes of those models are being manufactured."
  20. I mean, it's not like I don't have two oak trees and two pecan trees in my yard...
  21. Headed out to the farmers' market this morning. It's operating on abbreviated hours (9-noon) and with fairly stringent, for our part of the world, guidelines. Masks mandatory. I got there about five til nine. This was the line: They let in 50 people at the first shot, in stages. You can see orange tape in the background of the photo below; that divided the center aisle into two directional aisles, so you went down one and back up the other. Many signs. Shoppers more or less self-regulated by pausing before walking up to a table until the previous shopper had left. Neither of the regular strawberry vendors were there, and I was jonesing for some good, fresh strawberries. So I betook myself to one of the farms, about 30 miles away. It was a pretty day for a drive. Plenty of berries, and more on the way, from this field right behind the farm stand. The haul: That's a fried peach pie, which sadly wasn't very good, atop the eggs. Two thyme plants, as my herb garden got accidentally doused with whatever they sprayed on the lawn, so I'm having to replant it, and had not been able to find thyme. I was surprised not to see any squash, either yellow or zucchini; we generally have them by this time. Perhaps the rain put everyone late in planting. I think dinner tomorrow is going to be fried rice with snow peas and sugar snaps and fresh broccoli, along with a couple of left-over pork chops I'll dice up. Dinner tonight will be strawberry shortcake. Two quarts of those are quartered and in the fridge, reposing in some sugar and white balsamic vinegar, right now. The other one is in the fridge plain, the berries to be dredged in sour cream and dipped in brown sugar, Child A's favorite strawberry treatment.
  22. kayb

    Dinner 2020

    All these meals look absolutely gorgeous, particularly the meats on the grill. I am sporting a new top temporary denture (will get the bottom one next week), so everything I'm eating is soft, likely until I get the permanent ones in July. One of the few bad things about growing up on a farm. No flouride in that well water. Plus hereditary bad teeth. Plus not taking care of them like I should; I don't have many regrets in life, but that's one.
  23. I have confirmed the squirrels are the culprits in the asparagus bed. Caught one of the little buggers perched atop one side of it, asparagus set in his tiny hands, nibbling away. I'll plant something else there, and try asparagus again next year, with chicken wire over the top. Brazen little bastards. At least they don't like green beans, and I have no bunnies here.
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