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French Culinary Terms

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#31 GTO

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 08:21 AM

I'd have thought the opposite to your bf, fanny. If you listen carefully to "Ontario", the "n" is slightly elongated.

Think of it in musical terms. Hitting the Hi-hat closed, will give you the short "n" sound, opening it slightly will give you a subtle, slightly longer sound.

"On" by itself is faster, because it ends after the "n", the "n" in "Ontario" takes longer, because you're adjusting your throat and tounge for the "t".

:blink: All that for a bit of a word!

Edited by GTO, 14 October 2007 - 08:22 AM.

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#32 gfron1

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 09:29 AM

And how about millefeuille's pronounciation?

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#33 andiesenji

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 09:48 AM

For French, you might try this site! :rolleyes:
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#34 gfron1

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 08:16 PM

Ironically, tonight I was told that a skoehn was actually a skahn.

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#35 Mikeb19

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 01:43 AM

And how about millefeuille's pronounciation?

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Meel-fuh-eye (say it quickly)

That's a pretty tough one for most english speakers to pronounce let alone spell phonetically...

#36 priich

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 08:18 AM

And how about millefeuille's pronounciation?

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http://www.m-w.com/d...ry/millefeuille
Click the red little speaker symbols for audio.

#37 Sararwelch

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 12:22 PM

How about frangipane?

#38 Lindacakes

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Posted 17 October 2007 - 07:00 AM

In Corsica, I tried to order a mille feuille from a Belgian waiter. I ended up looking him in the eye and saying, "I'll have a Napoleon."

It was torture until I got there.

How about non pareil? It's not pastry, but it's sweet.
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#39 JeanneCake

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Posted 17 October 2007 - 06:06 PM

Or dragees!!!

#40 eskay

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Posted 17 October 2007 - 07:46 PM

for non pareil:

'Nohn pah-ray' is the closest I can think of that, but it's a little like millefeuille in that the eil and euille have a slight 'ee' sound at the end (it's pretty faint though). I think the technical term is a diphthong--a combination of two vowel sounds to produce a new one. An example in english is 'loin' If you say 'loh-een' a little quicker and mush the vowels together you get the 'oi' sound. So non pareil is sort of like 'nohn pah-rayee' except you don't really pronounce the ee as much as just add the flavour of it at the end. I hope that helped out a bit, sorry if it didn't--this is hard to do in just text!

dragée or dragee is pronounced drag-ay
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#41 sugarseattle

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 10:53 PM

pithiviers...pithy-vee-airs...sounds like an old apple. correctly pronounced PTVA.
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#42 jumanggy

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 11:19 PM

dragée or dragee is pronounced drag-ay

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It's a soft g, accent on the 2nd syllable (dra-ZHEY) :smile:

eskay, I would've thought the L of nonpareil was silent too, but the dictionary I looked at says non-puh-REL. Huh. No alternatives, either.

Edited by jumanggy, 18 October 2007 - 11:25 PM.

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#43 Darcie B

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 10:09 AM

eskay, I would've thought the L of nonpareil was silent too, but the dictionary I looked at says non-puh-REL. Huh. No alternatives, either.

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I know next to nothing about French, but a friend of mine who studied it said that if any of the letters in the word 'careful' are at the end of a word, you pronounce that letter. If you'll notice in words like millefeuille, the 'l' is not at the end of the word, so you don't pronounce it.

Then again, that could be complete bullshi*, I wouldn't know. Maybe my friend just wanted people to snicker at me. But that is what I was told.
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#44 Kerry Beal

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 02:27 PM

How about Dulce de Leche?

#45 ludja

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 02:44 PM

Gesztenyetorte  or Gesztenye torta
Hungarian chestnut cake
geh sten ye tor ta

in certain regions of Hungary  a bit of a y sound at the beginning
and alternate spelling,  gestenyepür torta  or
yeah sten ye pür tor ta

I learned this from my Hungarian housekeeper.

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Thanks, andie...

And then there is the German version of this cake which may be a little easier to pronounce..

"Kastanientorte"

kah-stahn"-nyen-tort-eh

Edited by ludja, 19 October 2007 - 02:44 PM.

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#46 andiesenji

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 04:23 PM

How about frangipane?

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fran gee pain
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#47 andiesenji

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 04:46 PM

How about Dulce de Leche?

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dool say day leh chay

Actually the pronunciation varies from country to country in Central and South America's Spanish-speaking countries as well as in Brazil.

Argentina claims the origin history of dulce de leche
but this is hotly contested by Mexico, Peru, Columbia, Uruguay, Cuba, Costa Rica and Brazil which calls it doce de leite. Not to mention Puerto Rico and Panama.
But it is also called dolce de latte in Patagonia
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#48 andiesenji

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 05:01 PM

Gesztenyetorte  or Gesztenye torta
Hungarian chestnut cake
geh sten ye tor ta

in certain regions of Hungary  a bit of a y sound at the beginning
and alternate spelling,  gestenyepür torta  or
yeah sten ye pür tor ta

I learned this from my Hungarian housekeeper.

View Post

Thanks, andie...

And then there is the German version of this cake which may be a little easier to pronounce..

"Kastanientorte"

kah-stahn"-nyen-tort-eh

View Post



Now if I could only figure out how the Polish version is spelled in the English alphabet as well as the pronunciation.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#49 aliaseater

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 11:28 AM

This is probably the wrong place to post this, but:

I breezed past a FN episode of "Guys Big Bite" (yeah, Fieri). He made a dish they were calling "Moc-Shoe". I know that's not the correct spelling for the classic dish and am wracking my brain (and google) for the right term/recipe. Can anyone give me a clue?

Thanks.

#50 Joe Blowe

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 11:37 AM

http://www.foodnetwo...6_37216,00.html

http://www.gumbopage...aque-choux.html
So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

#51 Doodad

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 11:39 AM

This is probably the wrong place to post this, but:

I breezed past a FN episode of "Guys Big Bite" (yeah, Fieri). He made a dish they were calling "Moc-Shoe". I know that's not the correct spelling for the classic dish and am wracking my brain (and google) for the right term/recipe. Can anyone give me a clue?

Thanks.

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Maque choux- and it is a great side dish.

#52 aliaseater

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 11:41 AM

Right on target Doodad--Thank you so much!
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#53 gfron1

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Posted 09 November 2007 - 04:07 PM

Here's the phonetic summary. Keep adding and correcting.

Tuile - Two-eel
Genoise - J-eh-nwah-ze
Bavaroise - Ba-va-rwah / Ba-va-rwah-zeCrepe - Creh-pe
Cannelle - ca-neh-le / canelé - ca-nəh-leh (ə being like euh)
Dacquoise - dack-wah-ze
Dragees - drag-ay [It's a soft g, accent on the 2nd syllable (dra-ZHEY)]
Dulce de Leche - dool say day leh chayPithiviers - correctly pronounced PTVA
Frangipane - fran gee pain
Gesztenyetorte - geh sten ye tor ta
Kastanientorte - kah-stahn-nyen-tort-eh
Macaron - Ma-ca-rohn (ron, is pronunced like r-on (ON as in ONtario not turn ON the music)
Millefeuille - Meel-fuh-eye (say it quickly)
Non pareil - Nohn pah-ray / non-puh-REL
Sfogliatelle - shfoo-ya-dell or schvee-a-dell


Useful tools:
For French, you might try this site!
http://www.m-w.com/d...ry/millefeuille
Click the red little speaker symbols for audio.

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#54 Joe Blowe

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Posted 09 November 2007 - 06:51 PM

Sfogliatelle = shfoo-ya-dell or schvee-a-dell  :laugh:

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Here's the phonetic summary.  Keep adding and correcting.
...
Sfogliatelle - shfoo-ya-dell or schvee-a-dell
...

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I knew there was a chance that this would come back to bite me! :unsure:

That would be the "New Joisey" pronunciation. As in Tony asking Carmela where's that box of shfooyadells! :raz:

Correct pronunciation can be found here...
So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

#55 rooftop1000

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 05:05 PM

Sfogliatelle = shfoo-ya-dell or schvee-a-dell  :laugh:

View Post

Here's the phonetic summary.  Keep adding and correcting.
...
Sfogliatelle - shfoo-ya-dell or schvee-a-dell
...

View Post

I knew there was a chance that this would come back to bite me! :unsure:

That would be the "New Joisey" pronunciation. As in Tony asking Carmela where's that box of shfooyadells! :raz:

Correct pronunciation can be found here...

View Post



looks the same to me :laugh:


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#56 gfron1

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Posted 24 June 2009 - 06:49 PM

I forgot how much fun this topic was :laugh: Here's a basic one that I could use some nuancing on: madeleine ...what is the sound at the end?

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#57 isomer

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Posted 24 June 2009 - 08:24 PM

I forgot how much fun this topic was  :laugh:  Here's a basic one that I could use some nuancing on:  madeleine ...what is the sound at the end?

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It's the sound of saying the letter "N". Maddle-"N"

#58 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 25 June 2009 - 08:02 AM

I'm glad you brought this topic up again.
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#59 jumanggy

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Posted 25 June 2009 - 08:32 AM

Gron-o-blahz, but a little, uh, Frenchier than I typed (use your imagination :) Actually, I didn't even know that, I just watched a few videos on Youtube to catch a French person saying it.
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#60 John DePaula

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Posted 25 June 2009 - 09:00 AM

I'm glad you brought this topic up again.
How about Grenobloise?

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I would say it's more like: Gruhn-o-blwahz.

Edited by John DePaula, 25 June 2009 - 09:04 AM.

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