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Strasbourg, Champagne, and Paris...


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#91 judiu

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 09:13 AM

I should also note - when I gave her a few bites of the eclair, Louisa said, "Wow.  You must really love me."  True friendship is sharing the best effing eclair on the planet.

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I don't. Share. My eclairs. Whenever we go to back to Montreal to visit my family, I always stop at my favorite patisserie and stock the fridge with 2 or 3 eclairs. For my own consumption. Somehow everyone knows this. Except for my brother in law. I really had to hold my tongue one night when he took the last one, ate it all in front of me, then asked, "Oh, were you saving this?"


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That, my dear, is a man that "jess need killin"! :rolleyes:
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#92 Megan Blocker

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 02:08 PM

Yes, thank you so much for a fabulous report.  My favorite sentence is the one about not being able to control your shoulders.

I had never had much of a desire to go to Strasbourg before, but your warm glow is contagious.

(A little shock, though. Last time I was in Paris I remember everyone, everywhere advertised that they had Poulaine.  But Haagen Dasz!!!)

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Well, to be fair, that's an actual Haagen Dazs store...actually, that's where the internet cafe was. Really odd, right? Don't worry, that's not where I got my gelato!!! :biggrin:
"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

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#93 Lori in PA

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 06:32 AM

Sigh. Does it have to be done? Thank you for sharing, Megan.
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#94 Ling

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 10:50 PM

Later that afternoon, we headed back to our neighborhood to go to Pierre Herme, which is just on the corner of rue Bonaparte and Place Saint Sulpice, only a few blocks south of Laduree.  It's Ling heaven! :wink:

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It certainly is! Although this entire trip sounds absolutely heavenly! :wub: I just found the link this evening in your signature, and spent the last few hours glued to the images. Thanks for showing us Prague and parts of France through your eyes!

I am also very curious, after reading John Talbott's recent post what you thought of the bread in France. (John said he found the bread in Seattle to be better.) Although I like some of the bread made here very much, I've always thought (perhaps incorrectly) that bread in the US just can't compare, as bread making is traditionally such a honed craft in France. I am wondering how the bread you ate in France compares to what you can get from the better bakeries in NY.

Edited by Ling, 05 November 2006 - 11:15 PM.


#95 Daddy-A

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Posted 06 November 2006 - 08:46 AM

I am also very curious, after reading John Talbott's recent post what you thought of the bread in France. (John said he found the bread in Seattle to be better.) Although I like some of the bread made here very much, I've always thought (perhaps incorrectly) that bread in the US just can't compare, as bread making is traditionally such a honed craft in France. I am wondering how the bread you ate in France compares to what you can get from the better bakeries in NY.

I know you asked this of Megan, but after my recent visit I thought I'd add my two cents' worth ...

I think in overall quality, French baking is way ahead of the game in North America. Like most things food related, bread is part of their culture. People walking home from work with a few bagettes tucked in a hand bag are a common sight.

While it's true that not all the bread we ate in France was excellent, none of it was awful. The same cannot be said for the bread found around Vancouver. The best bread I've ever eaten comes from Victoria (Wildfire Bakery for those interested), but I've also some gummy crap from bakeries that shall remain nameless.

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#96 John Talbott

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Posted 06 November 2006 - 09:05 AM

I am also very curious, after reading John Talbott's recent post what you thought of the bread in France. (John said he found the bread in Seattle to be better.) Although I like some of the bread made here very much, I've always thought (perhaps incorrectly) that bread in the US just can't compare, as bread making is traditionally such a honed craft in France. I am wondering how the bread you ate in France compares to what you can get from the better bakeries in NY.

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Oh, oh, I should be careful with my comparative statements and expect folks to read more than one Forum; maybe I should have said that the bread in Seattle was an astonishing and unexpected surprise after all the very fine bread in France. World War III I didn't intend to start. I just was impressed that even in a jam-packed, albeit glorified sandwicherie - Matt's - we had outstanding bread.
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#97 Megan Blocker

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Posted 07 November 2006 - 09:24 AM

I am also very curious, after reading John Talbott's recent post what you thought of the bread in France. (John said he found the bread in Seattle to be better.) Although I like some of the bread made here very much, I've always thought (perhaps incorrectly) that bread in the US just can't compare, as bread making is traditionally such a honed craft in France. I am wondering how the bread you ate in France compares to what you can get from the better bakeries in NY.

I know you asked this of Megan, but after my recent visit I thought I'd add my two cents' worth ...

I think in overall quality, French baking is way ahead of the game in North America. Like most things food related, bread is part of their culture. People walking home from work with a few bagettes tucked in a hand bag are a common sight.

While it's true that not all the bread we ate in France was excellent, none of it was awful. The same cannot be said for the bread found around Vancouver. The best bread I've ever eaten comes from Victoria (Wildfire Bakery for those interested), but I've also some gummy crap from bakeries that shall remain nameless.

A.

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I agree with Arne here...the lowest level in France is significantly higher than the lowest level in the States, but that doesn't mean all of the bread is across the board the best in the world. We have some pretty excellent bread here in New York, but you still encounter more inferior bread here than you do in Paris.

As someone said on another thread, France is just a country, not the home of all things perfect. :wink:
"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

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#98 Abra

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 07:41 AM

Megan, since you're the semi-official ambassadress of Strasbourg, did you get to Colmar? I'm planning a trip up there for the week before Christmas, and am trying to decide whether to just stay in Strasbourg and day trip to Colmar (half an hour and a handful of Euros away by train) or whether to split time between the two hotel-wise. We won't have a car, if that makes a difference.

All other Alsace afficionados are of course invited to chime in here.

#99 milkman

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 01:13 AM

Abra, what are you expecting of Colmar?

There isn't much you won't find something similar in Strasbourg apart from the world famous Musee d'Unterlinden (medieval and renaissance art). Gastronomically there is not really much in Colmar worthy of a special trip. Without a car a long day trip might well be sufficient (ignoring Christmas markets, etc.)

see also http://forums.egulle...howtopic=115500 for some earlier comments on Colmar and http://forums.egulle...howtopic=102842 for some restaurants in Alsace and Lorraine including Strasbourg.

#100 Abra

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Posted 13 August 2008 - 01:07 AM

Thanks, milkman. It's really just going to be a Christmas market trip. I had seen your two threads before, but it's good to have another look.

#101 Megan Blocker

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 09:27 AM

Megan, since you're the semi-official ambassadress of Strasbourg, did you get to Colmar?  I'm planning a trip up there for the week before Christmas, and am trying to decide whether to just stay in Strasbourg and day trip to Colmar (half an hour and a handful of Euros away by train) or whether to split time between the two hotel-wise.  We won't have a car, if that makes a difference.

All other Alsace afficionados are of course invited to chime in here.

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I did not! We never made it out of Strasbourg, sadly, though I am thinking of doing an Alsace trip for the big 3-0 next year. I can't wait to hear all about your Christmastime trip to Alsace...talk about a fantasy.
"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

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