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eG Cook-Off #65: Pork Belly

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116 replies to this topic

#31 Shelby

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 01:11 PM

would  Siu Yook be similar to Siew Yoke ?

Yes it looks to be very similar.  Here is the recipe I'm using:

 

http://forums.egulle...rk-belly/page-4



#32 rotuts

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 01:16 PM

thank you .  this one ?

 

http://forums.egulle...inese-siu-yook/

 

i have two vac packed bellies in the freezer uncooked.  mine have the cartilage bits on one end.

 

Ive tried to figure out where on the pig these come from but can only think the median rib cage.

 

Ill try to bring them out and do something with them if the snow ever stops.  Mine would need a visit at then end on the

 

Weber, currently buried deep.


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#33 rotuts

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 01:33 PM

here they are:

 

PB fz.jpg

 

they are a little over a kilo each.  meaty-er than I recalled.

 

thanks for the inspiration.

 

 


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#34 Shelby

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 01:40 PM

thank you .  this one ?

 

http://forums.egulle...inese-siu-yook/

 

i have two vac packed bellies in the freezer uncooked.  mine have the cartilage bits on one end.

 

Ive tried to figure out where on the pig these come from but can only think the median rib cage.

 

Ill try to bring them out and do something with them if the snow ever stops.  Mine would need a visit at then end on the

 

Weber, currently buried deep.

Yes, that's the one :)

 

I have scored, salted, vodkad and marinated.  Mr. Pork is now resting in the fridge.  I let it rest for 48 hours last time and will probably do that again.  We will visit Mr. P on Tuesday.


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#35 Paul Bacino

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 02:58 PM

Finished Playing with My Sous Vide Pork Belly  __  Sweet and Sour  ( My way )

 

I used a little pork stock in my rice, small side salad with sesame dressing and fresh Pineapple 

 

IMG_7122.JPG

 

 


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Its good to have Morels

#36 rotuts

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:01 PM

Ooooooo !  Oooooooooooooooooo !

 

PB  : you win !

 

please consider sharing that Rx for thew PaulB S&S PB:

 

times etc etc. if you will

 

I wont share it !

 

so delicious looking.   love the 'crust'


Edited by rotuts, 16 February 2014 - 04:02 PM.

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#37 David Ross

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:34 PM

I've only been cooking with pork belly for a few years so recipe box is pretty limited right now.  But the one pork belly recipe I've done many times is always a winner--Pork Belly Confit.  It's based on a recipe from Thomas Keller's Ad Hoc at Home cookbook.  I've used pieces of the finished pork belly in Banh Mi sandwiches, (at our Banh-Mi Cook-Off here http://forums.egulle...-banh-mi/page-3), but this rendition of pork belly is also delicious when cut into a larger cube then sauteed to crisp the skin and served with potato puree, pork jus and a huckleberry compote.

 

You could start by brining the pork belly, but I don't think it adds much flavor and by using a "confit" style cooking method the brine won't make the pork any more tender.  The tenderness comes from the slow cooking in the fat.

 

Here's a fairly good pork belly to start, thick, meaty and a good layer of fat-

Pork belly 1.png

 

I leave the rind, (outer skin), on and then submerge the pork belly in melted lard.  Into a 200 oven to slowly cook for 6 hours-

Pork belly 2.png

 

Here's porky after the fat bath-

Pork belly 3.png

 

Then into a heavy casserole dish, strained fat poured over, then covered and chilled in the fridge for about 4 or 5 days-

Pork belly 4.png

Pork belly 5.png

 

Then slowly melt the fat again, remove the pork belly and carefully cut off the outer rind.  I found that if I left the rind on it was as tough as that shoe leather Charlie Chaplin tried to eat-

Pork belly 6.png

 

Then into a hot saute pan to warm up the pork and crisp the skin-

Pork belly 7.png

Pork belly 8.png

 

It wasn't technically a traditional Banh Mi the way I treated and cut the pork belly, but it sure was good--a good French roll, mayonnaise, cilantro, radish, cucumber, carrot, pork pate and pork belly.  I won't stop at Banh Mi with this method of cooking pork belly. Really moist and yet crispy.


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#38 Paul Bacino

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 06:03 PM

Ooooooo !  Oooooooooooooooooo !
 
PB  : you win !
 
please consider sharing that Rx for thew PaulB S&S PB:
 
times etc etc. if you will
 
I wont share it !
 
so delicious looking.   love the 'crust'


RT...falling back to the serious eats..sous vide pork belly.

The belly is sous vide..170 for 10 hrs. Cool in bag and defatted the next day

In prep #1--I removed the belly and just pan seared

In prep #2-- I roasted the belly with the liquid, reserved from sous vide, @375F for about an hr...this I never basted..cuz I didn't want a soy bomb...but just the heat created this exterior glazed. Wasn't to salty..nice sweetness with the pineapple.
Its good to have Morels

#39 huiray

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 10:34 PM

Chanko-nabe miso-aji. 

 

Patterned after the recipe here. (scroll down to the bottom)  I adjusted some of the quantities (e.g. much more sake, more daikon, etc).  I also made dashi from katsuobushi (shaved bonito) before adding in the dashi stock ("flakes").  Also simmered the pork belly slices for longer than in the recipe.

 

 

Pork belly, sliced up.  Half skin-on, half skin-off.

DSCN0558a_1k.jpg

 

 

The katsuobushi I used.  This went into the 10 cups of simmering water, (whole package), the mixture stirred & brought back to a fast simmer; then all the solids fished out with a fine-meshed large sieve.

DSCN0560a_1k.jpg

DSCN0562a_1k.jpg

 

 

The dashi stock (a little less than in the recipe) then went in; followed by the pork belly slices, then the sake (I used ryori-shu) and mirin (I used mirin-fuu).  More ryori-shu (and a bit more mirin) than in the recipe; adjusted to my taste.

DSCN0565a_1k.jpg

 

 

The mirin-fuu (on the left) and ryori-shu (on the right) I used.

DSCN0568a_1k.jpg

 

 

The dashi stock I used.

DSCN0570a_1k.jpg

 

 

Aka miso (red miso) and (mutenka) shiro miso (white miso) was slurried w/ some water and added in to the pot, adjusted somewhat to taste.

 

 

The miso pastes I used.

DSCN0581a_1k.jpg

 

 

The veggies and some other stuff:

Left to right: daikon (peeled), fresh shiitake mushrooms, fresh thick-cap Chinese-type far-koo mushrooms,  enoki mushrooms, bunapi-shimeji mushrooms (white beech), nira (Chinese garlic chives). 

At bottom: a pack of abura-age.

DSCN0574a_1k.jpg

 

 

Stuff after being cut up; plus large cubes of drained firm tofu.

DSCN0577a_1k.jpg

 

 

Potatoes (Red Pontiac), carrots, an onion.

DSCN0585a_1k.jpg

 

 

Carrots, potatoes, daikon, onion (all sliced up) in the simmering soup.

DSCN0586a_1k.jpg

 

 

The rest of the stuff, plus cut-up washed Napa cabbage (not pictured above) added in.

DSCN0589a_1k.jpg

 

 

A bowl of the completed chanko-nabe miso-aji.

DSCN0591a_1k.jpg


Edited by huiray, 18 February 2014 - 09:55 AM.

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#40 David Ross

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 04:49 AM

That looks delicious.  Thanks for the great tutuorial.


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#41 David Ross

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 04:51 AM

This is my Pork Belly Banh Mi-

Pork belly 9.png


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#42 David Ross

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 06:05 PM

Anyone have any experience with making fried pork rinds from the belly?  I was watching a segment on "The Best Thing I Ever Ate" on Cooking Channel and I was pretty much salivating over the fried pork rinds they served at Publican in Chicago.  They did show the process but not in enough detail that I could duplicate the recipe. 

 

Looks like they use the actual outer rind from the belly, then dehydrate it and then fry it.  I really liked the garnish of malt vinegar powder.  Any ideas on a source for the powder?



#43 Tri2Cook

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 06:22 PM

Modernist Pantry carries malt, white and balsamic vinegar powders.


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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#44 Paul_C

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 02:53 AM

I made this a few weeks ago.

Pork.JPG

 

Braised in cider and chicken stock with a few aromats and then deep fried. Tender meat and the crackling was like shards of glass. Hmmm.

 

The intention was to sous vide it rather than braise but I was too impatient to wait the 2 days. When you want pork, you want pork now!

 

Seeing as though I had the fryer on the go I did a black pudding and apple croquette with it as well.


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#45 jayt90

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 04:54 AM

Braised in cider and chicken stock with a few aromats and then deep fried. Tender meat and the crackling was like shards of glass. Hmmm.

 

The intention was to sous vide it rather than braise but I was too impatient to wait the 2 days. When you want pork, you want pork now!

 

 

A not too large pork belly like yours should respond well to pressure cooking 1 hour or less. The collagen, fat, and skin will soften and the meat will not overcook, as it is subjected to 240 F steam heat similar to enclosed oven heat for an hour. 

Finishing by deep frying should crisp the skin. (I rarely deep fry).



#46 huiray

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 09:48 AM

I was thinking about what to make for lunch and thought of babi assam with pork belly - then remembered that I had posted about it before on eG. :-)  Have a look here: http://forums.egulle...19#entry1944654 , scroll down to the fourth "sub-entry".

 

Here's another picture focusing on that dish:

DSCN0052b_1k.jpg

 

The ingredients comprised pork belly (skin on), green chillies, salted soy beans, tamarind, oil, salt, sugar, water, candlenuts, shallots, shrimp paste (belacan).

 

p.s. This is considered to be another Peranakan (a.k.a. Nyonya) dish, as I indicated when I referred to it in my post from the dinner thread.


Edited by huiray, 18 February 2014 - 10:04 AM.

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#47 Paul_C

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 11:37 AM

 

Braised in cider and chicken stock with a few aromats and then deep fried. Tender meat and the crackling was like shards of glass. Hmmm.

 

The intention was to sous vide it rather than braise but I was too impatient to wait the 2 days. When you want pork, you want pork now!

 

 

A not too large pork belly like yours should respond well to pressure cooking 1 hour or less. The collagen, fat, and skin will soften and the meat will not overcook, as it is subjected to 240 F steam heat similar to enclosed oven heat for an hour. 

Finishing by deep frying should crisp the skin. (I rarely deep fry).

 

Noted, thanks.



#48 Shelby

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 11:39 AM

Pork belly

 

Image 4.jpg

 

After scoring, salt and vodka

 

Image 2.jpg

 

After resting for 2 days in the fridge

 

Image.jpg

 

Right before I'm getting ready to have a huge piece

 

Image 1.jpg

 

 

OMG this one was better.  Lots more meat.  

 

I'm ready for another pork belly!

 

Oh and the last pic is after rubbing the hoisin mixture on

Attached Images

  • Image 3.jpg

Edited by Shelby, 19 February 2014 - 11:40 AM.

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#49 rotuts

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 03:53 PM

I decided today to use one of the 2 PB's pic'd above.  After all, this was No Snow Day !

 

I had moderate low expectations.  Why ? some time ago, before the internet and eG'  I did PB's on my weber, low and slow with a

 

'rub' same as i did Pork ribs.  it was outstanding and delicious.  but too fatty for me.

 

....

 

I decided to learn from this so used what I had around:   I scored the top :

 

PB 1.jpg

 

and used a Sauer's Pork Rub, as I had it:

 

https://www.cfsauer.com/

 

then I roasted it for 30 min in the BV-XL at 400   ( no particular reason ) to get some color:

 

PB II.jpg

 

then turned the BV down to 220 for 2 hours ( you have to reset ) and checked the temp and added

 

one more hour :  TermaPen at 175:

 

PB III.jpg

 

tried the skin: not so good, so took it off.

 

PB IV.jpg

 

added some Maesri Sweet Chili sauce, under the broiler, about three times:

 

PB V.jpg

 

getting there :

 

PB VI.jpg

 

saving the rest for a Sandwich w/wo soup tomorrow.

 

Ill do this again, and work a bit harder on the skin and make a rub/glaze just for this

 

delicious  not too greasy.

 

:biggrin:

 

Ill also add time on the 'bake' to get the ThermoPen to 185 or so


Edited by rotuts, 20 February 2014 - 04:00 PM.

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#50 Shelby

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 04:13 PM

Looks delicious!!!  Melt in your mouth goodness!

 

I bet if you torched the skin on top for a bit or broiled it, you would have liked it.  To me (and I've very new at this so you might not want to listen lol) the skin doesn't look done enough to be crunchy.



#51 rotuts

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 04:21 PM

thanks.  it was close to the 'melt' but I needed to add time on the 'bake' to get it to 185 or 190 T.P'd

 

good idea on the broil on the skin:  next time.

 

also Im going to do an Orange type rub and an Orange type hot and sour glaze.

 

Id also like to do the same technique exactly ( what ever that might be that day ) and put one piece in the BV-XL and the other in

 

the CuisiSteamBoy and do the same times etc one w/o 'steam' and one w steam.  dont hold your breath for the results !

 

which until I get Additional Amps in the Kitchen, has moved to the former bathroom upstairs, now the

 

SV/Experimental Steam Station etc

 

( w running water )


Edited by rotuts, 20 February 2014 - 04:23 PM.

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#52 jayt90

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 04:39 PM

Best pork skin I have had was at Ho Ho in north Toronto. Crispy, succulent, and soft.

 

In this thread it is either too soft or too tough.

 

I see only two ways to get it soft and crispy:  

Sous vide plus broiling

or Pressure cooker plus broiling.

 

Here is the Ho Ho method, which I have  failed to duplicate at home. 

http://www.gourmet.c...09/08/ho-ho-bbq.

 

They do several sides of pork every day. It is not just pork belly, but it is all good.



#53 Kerala

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 04:19 AM

Intrigued by this and the other pork belly thread, and also by Ken Hom who has been going around China on Saturday Morning Kitchen, I tried my own twice-cooked pb. Faux-Chinese preparation: pressure cooked pb strips with ginger, pepper, bay seeds, white vinegar, chilli powder and Chinese five-spice for 50 minutes. Marinade the strips in hoi-sin sauce, namh pla. Finish off in a flat frying pan to get some crispiness and colour.

Apologies to all those offended by this utterly barbaric act. You were all responsible for inspiring me.

And thank you everyone. Absolutely delicious melt-in-the-mouth unctiousness. I can't wait to do it again!


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#54 David Ross

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 03:44 PM

This weekend I'll start on some bacon.


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#55 David Ross

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 04:10 PM

Wow Shelby that is a massive pork belly compared to the puny stuff I get. It would be perfect for bacon. Did you just find it at a local market or did you have to ask a butcher to order it for you? If I only lived more close to the land of pork.



#56 Shelby

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 04:24 PM

Wow Shelby that is a massive pork belly compared to the puny stuff I get. It would be perfect for bacon. Did you just find it at a local market or did you have to ask a butcher to order it for you? If I only lived more close to the land of pork.

Is it really big?  I have no way to compare since I had never seen or eaten it before.  The only place we can find it is at the Asian Market in the big city.  We didn't special order it.  You have to get there early in the morning though, or else it's all gone.  We can finally eat pork belly AND I can also get ground pork which is another new yummy thing for me.

 

I may live closer to the land of pork, but I'd trade you to live in the land of fresh seafood :)


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#57 rotuts

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 06:28 PM

""  You have to get there early in the morning though  ""

 

Yar.  I've noticed this myself.  I go to the ChinaMart in Allston SUN AM.  Opens at 9 am

 

PB's gone by 9:30 AM

 

get there at 9:15 and there is a bit of a scuffle for the last few.

 

:huh:


Edited by rotuts, 21 February 2014 - 06:28 PM.

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#58 rotuts

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 06:34 PM

pics of the 'Asian Market' would be nice .....     :biggrin:

 

maybe some scuffle ....


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#59 Shelby

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 08:24 PM

pics of the 'Asian Market' would be nice .....     :biggrin:

 

maybe some scuffle ....

Ok, I'll try to do that!  

 

To me, when I walk through the store it's like a new world.  I stand and stare at the canned goods….the fresh fish…..the meat section…OH and the veggie section is SO fresh compared to the big grocery stores in the city.  WHICH I don't understand.  I'm happy to get fresh, cheaper veggies at the Asian market, but I don't get how they are SO much cheaper and SO much fresher than the big chain stores.

 

Now, to be fair, the frozen section is VERY frozen and very old.  Very old.  Everything looks so freezer burned.  Blech.  

 

BUT, the fresh stuff FAR out weighs the frozen bad stuff.

 

Oh and there is certainly scuffle to get the best belly etc. in the morning :)



#60 rotuts

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 06:56 AM

AsianMart:  Gr. Onions :  3 / dollar

 

WhiteBreadMart:  99c each.

 

the AsianMart Gr.Onions has roots:  rinse and place bunch in yogurt container w some water on the bottom:  last forever.

 

they cut them off for the WhiteBreadCrowd   :huh:







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