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Foodblog: Smithy - Notes from the land of Cheap Refrigeration


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#61 heidih

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 11:05 AM

Back up on the salad post you noted that you each have your preferred dressings. Made or bought? Care to share? 

 

I think both of the pre-preps of vegetable and fruit for handy inclusion in meals is a concept that can be adapted and adopted by many busy folks. My current "ready to grab for a quick meal/snack" are lacinto kale already dressed with olive oil, wine vinegar, shallots and shaved asiago,  and an overabundance of Lebanese cucumbers in a spicy yogurt dressing. 


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#62 rotuts

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 11:07 AM

BTW: some Knife-ish aficionados dislike the bamboo cutting boards as they feel the wood dense grass it too hard for their

 

knives 'keen edge'  I have not found this the case for me, and my knives have an EdgePro edge.

 

they are pleasant to look at and pleasing to the eye. and well, they are Legal Grass !

 

if you enjoy using it, just keep using it.

 

I do not know about those vapors.  maybe they will go away?

 

try the scrub even with the scrubbies that are not for teflon  ( green )

 

then the 50% bleach soak.  then see.


Edited by rotuts, 14 January 2014 - 11:11 AM.

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#63 heidih

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 11:08 AM

On the bamboo cutting board - I have one I got as a gift a few years ago and never used. It still has that sort of vegetal bamboo smell. Like the bamboo steamer always releases that same smell. Perhaps that is the nature of bamboo?  In the past I have never sealed wooden boards. Currently using plastic. 


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#64 MelissaH

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 11:47 AM

 

 

I now have a beautiful, smooth squash puree thanks to a food mill. It seems a bit moist. The recipe says to use bread crumbs to thicken if necessary, but since I just realized I'm out of Parmesan cheese <scowl> I'm letting it drain prior to being put away for now. Actually it's too late for me to start messing with mixing fresh pasta dough and forming the raviolis tonight, anyway; I'm slow enough at all this that I tend to make the filling one day and use it a day or two later.

I'm reminded of the ladies who make the pierogi at St. Stephen's Church here in Oswego. Every day of the week leading up to their big festival, they make one kind of pierogi, and one filling. First, they make the dough (usually three or four food processors and stand mixers going at a time), set each batch aside to rest for a moment, and pass a batch of rested dough on to someone else to roll it out and cut circles. The circles get placed on parchment-lined sheet pans, and sent on to the tables of fillers. The fillers take the balls of filling that were made yesterday, place each ball onto a dough circle, pinch the edges shut, and put the filled pierogi back onto the sheet pan. The pans then go to a checker, who checks that no filling has crept into the seal (which would result in the pierog opening in the boiling pot) and fixes any potential problems, and then put in the freezer to wait for the festival. When the day's batch is complete (meaning all the dough balls have been sealed into dough), the next day's filling gets mixed and scooped with a disher into individual balls, which are put on parchment lined sheet pans and frozen. The freezing helps to keep the filling in a rounded shape, which in turn keeps it away from the edges when the dough gets pinched shut so the pierogi stay properly sealed in the cooking process. Doing it the day before also helps to expedite the assembly line, because the filling becomes grab-and-go and because the dough makers will know exactly how many batches of dough they need to make that day, for the complete batch. The pierogi stay frozen until the festival, when they get boiled and then fried. They'll also sell them frozen, for people to take home and cook later.
 
I wonder if a similar methodology of freezing ravioli filling in dollops would help to expedite your process?

Great idea, and thanks for the evocative description of the St. Stephens assembly line!

 

It's still amazing to me how efficient the assembly line production is: in just 3 or 4 hours, they can have literally a thousand pierogi finished, and about the same number of filling balls in the freezer for the next day's batch. When I haven't been busy during prep week, I've gone over to help but also (selfishly) to learn some of their secrets. The only jobs I haven't done at this point are mixing the dough and cooking the pierogi, because those are reserved for special people who have been at it for decades. I knew I was on their good side when they allowed me to roll the dough out flat!

 

Making the pierogi is women's work at the church, although the cooking on the day of the festival is strictly men's work. Another thing that's strictly men's work is coring the cabbages for the golabki, with an electric drill and large bit! I think the first year I helped was the first time I'd ever seen a power tool repurposed for kitchen work.

 

Smithy, you have a nice array of international cuisine sections in your supermarket. Is the population as diverse?


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#65 rotuts

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 11:54 AM

"""   strictly men's work is coring the cabbages for the golabki, with an electric drill and large bit ""

 

in no way trying to get off track here, but this got me thinking of this:

 

http://www.amazon.co...hole drill bits

 

thanks for the idea !


Edited by rotuts, 14 January 2014 - 11:54 AM.

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#66 rotuts

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 12:27 PM

BTW  the 'bleach soak' above was meant to be a 'bleach-flood' for a few minutes.  hot water and bleach would do.

 

wooden boards or grass boards should not 'soak' in water.

 

use   then clean  then dry.

 

:biggrin:

 

Id be very interested to hear if the bleach takes care of the grassy-smell

 

mine never had it.


Edited by rotuts, 14 January 2014 - 12:28 PM.


#67 Smithy

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 01:21 PM

Porthos, rotuts and heidih, thanks for all the input on the cutting board.  I'll try the bleach method and see whether that helps.  I wouldn't have described it as a grassy smell, though; I know what a bamboo steamer smells like and this wasn't it; it seemed a bit more sour, and not in a pleasant lemony sense.  That's part of the puzzlement.

 

I have a couple of wooden cutting boards as well as several plastic ones.  The most useful to me are the flexible mats - usually 3 or 4 to a package for not much money.  I use those for meats, but have read that they're harder on knives than wooden cutting boards.  Their flexibility is wonderful: cut or chop stuff, flip it into the bowl or pot.  I also like that they're more or less dishwasher-safe.  However, I find that they do warp in the dishwasher after a while, so I tend to wash them by hand if they were used for fruit or vegetables.  Porthos, I'm probably almost as careful as you about meat contamination...but I don't worry about pre-washing before things go into the dishwasher.  Is that because your dishwasher doesn't get things clean without a careful prerinse, or some other reason?  Do your knives also go into the dishwasher, or are they an exception to the "no handwashing" rule?


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#68 Smithy

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 01:26 PM

Smithy, I am enjoying this blog. I also followed your princess camping stories.

 

This bamboo cutting board is a new acquisition: $10 from Smart and Final, and I've been admiring the beauty of these babies for a while. 

I am rather anal about having only plastic cutting boards in my kitchen. I am very big on everything being able to go into the dishwasher.  I purchased a bamboo board a few years ago. I rarely used it because of my aversion to hand-washing. It finally went to a thrift shop. (The aversion is to hand-washing as the final cleaning. I pre-scrub everything before it goes into the dishwasher. Maybe if I had a 3-compartment sink in my kitchen...)

 

I also got a chuckle out of recognizing the mixing bowl you used. I have them in multiples in 3qt through 8 qt plus a14 qt. Are yours Tramontina or another brand?

 Thank you for the compliments!

 

The mixing bowl is some thing I picked up at, oh, Target or Pier 1 or a grocery store down south.  I keep buying more of these - I have 2 or 3 in the trailer and 2 here at home - in different sizes.  They're such great mixing bowls, and I like the shape.  The very first bowl of these I bought over 30 years ago at some import store in Pasadena, I can't even remember the name.  Maybe a Cost Plus?  Early Pier 1?


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#69 Smithy

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 01:48 PM

Back up on the salad post you noted that you each have your preferred dressings. Made or bought? Care to share? 

 

I think both of the pre-preps of vegetable and fruit for handy inclusion in meals is a concept that can be adapted and adopted by many busy folks. My current "ready to grab for a quick meal/snack" are lacinto kale already dressed with olive oil, wine vinegar, shallots and shaved asiago,  and an overabundance of Lebanese cucumbers in a spicy yogurt dressing. 

 

We make our own, sort of.  He starts with a package of Good Seasons Italian or Zesty Italian dressing mix.  He uses white balsamic vinegar and about a 50/50 mix of olive oil and whatever vegetable oil we have on hand (Wesson soybean, at present).  The mixture of oil is so that his doesn't congeal in the refrigerator.

 

I prefer a vinaigrette based loosely on an Egyptian salad dressing recipe I picked up a few years ago.  Start with a clove or three of finely minced garlic, then grind it with a couple of teaspoons of fine sea salt to make a paste.  Scoop those into a mixing jar.  Maybe add some dried sumac, or a touch of dijon mustard, or freshly chopped cilantro and/or parsley, depending on mood and availability.  For acid I generally use lemon juice - Meyer if I can get it - but if the lemons are tooooo strong I may tone it down a bit with white wine vinegar. I like straight olive oil, even though I have to take the salad dressing out of the refrigerator in advance to get it to de-congeal.  My preferred proportions are 2 parts oil to 1 part acid, so if I squeezed enough lemon to get 1/2 cup I'll use 1 cup olive oil.  

 

With regard to the congealing oil, I've discovered that if I can keep the dressing emulsified it doesn't set up as hard.  Toward that end I've experimented with a touch of xanthan gum, to some success, although it's easy to overdo it and give the dressing an unpleasant drooly consistency.

 

Once I hit on the "two parts oil to one part vinegar" routine, I started having a blast with making my own salad dressings.  I find that walnut oil and (red) balsamic vinegar are brilliant together.

 

You can see my salad dressing, recently shaken (it does separate quickly), in the background of this lunch photo.

 

Lunch 2.jpg


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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#70 Smithy

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 02:15 PM

<snip>

 

Making the pierogi is women's work at the church, although the cooking on the day of the festival is strictly men's work. Another thing that's strictly men's work is coring the cabbages for the golabki, with an electric drill and large bit! I think the first year I helped was the first time I'd ever seen a power tool repurposed for kitchen work.

 

Smithy, you have a nice array of international cuisine sections in your supermarket. Is the population as diverse?

 

 

I love the idea of using power tools to deal with kitchen chores.  As I recall, you use a lathe to peel winter squash, do you not?

 

I think of Duluth's population as still being pretty homogenous: European ancestry, for the most part: Scandinavian, Germanic, Slavic, British Isles, based on the faces I see in the grocery store.  However, the populations of the university and colleges here are quite mixed, as are the staff of the medical facilities: with 2 major hospital chains and I-don't-know-how many clinics, the medical practice accounts for a lot of employment around here.

 

Unfortunately the demand for international cuisine hasn't been enough to keep any sort of specialty store afloat, except for a couple of Italian groceries that have been around here forever.  (Italian immigrants were a major wave early in the last century.) The Oriental grocery died several years ago, I believe a victim of the general economic slump that hit us all around 2008.  There's never been a good Middle Eastern or Indian grocery store here.  I'm glad that Cub and Mt. Royal, my other favorite large grocery store here (still to be visited this week) are meeting the demand.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#71 Porthos

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 02:33 PM

Do your knives also go into the dishwasher, or are they an exception to the "no handwashing" rule?

I have one 9 1/2" chef's knife that I hand-wash. I only use it for veggie prep. All other knives go into the dishwasher. My machine has a 6 comparment cutlery tray built into the door. I only put one knife in each of the 3 sections I use for knives so that they don't bang against each other. My other 9 1/2" chef's knife, which I have had for 30 years, does go in the dishwasher. The two 9 1/2" are from the same maker, long out of business. I sharpen all of my knives on my EdgePro and have never had issues with the dishwasher affecting them. I spent 16 years in the corrosion monitoring industry so I have some insight as to what could happen.

 

IMAG0345.jpg


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#72 Smithy

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 02:40 PM

Tonight's dinner is marinating at present.  The recipe is a happy discovery from Fine Cooking, Issue #155 (Feb/Mar 2012): Citrus-Marinated Roasted Chicken.  http://www.finecooki...ed-chicken.aspx  

 

Start with these ingredients:

Roast chicken ingredients.jpg

 

Most of it's self-explanatory.  The recipe actually calls for 2 chickens in order to make plenty of leftovers, but we're already swimming in leftovers so I just pulled one chicken out of the freezer. This chicken was locally raised and purchased at our farmer's market last summer.  The honey is a product of a really great farm out near Reno, Nevada, and was a gift from my sister.  Great stuff.  This is infused with basil, definitely not a part of the recipe, but I think it will add a nice touch.  The pomegranate is also my addition; I'll use some seeds as garnish.

 

I picked too small a roasting pan and will have to put a drip pan under it in the oven, but otherwise I think this will be fine.  It's to marinate for at least 6 hours before roasting.

 

Chicken in marinade.jpg  Marinating under the lily pad.jpg

 

This kitchen island has outlets on both sides and at one end.  When I designed it I told the electrician that I wanted it wired like a lab bench.  He looked me over - we'd all been working together long enough to be comfortable - and said, "I think you're a bit of a mad scientist!" :laugh:  

 

Outlets on back.jpg

 

The cats aren't allowed atop kitchen surfaces, but I usually have one supervising as I work.


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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#73 rotuts

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 03:22 PM

Sooo  ...

 

who is this ?

 

cat.jpg

 

and the other?

 

they do like to keep track of things  

 

:biggrin:

 

if you went to the 'funnies' 

 

you might get a good laugh. :

 

cant find it but its here:  for cat people:

 

https://www.facebook...388794651351969

 

its food related.


Edited by rotuts, 14 January 2014 - 03:34 PM.

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#74 C. sapidus

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 09:23 PM

We remodeled a few years ago. . . .  All in all we're very happy with the outcome, but we aren't eager to go through the process again.  :laugh:

 

 

And that is pretty much the definition of a successful kitchen renovation. :rolleyes:

 

We installed a good hood and vented it outside, but if you do enough stir-frying grease still finds a way to glom onto the outside of the hood.

 

Our previous house had short cabinets with a grease-attracting gap above and I vowed never again. When we renovated our current kitchen we installed tall kitchen cabinets that butt up against the ceiling. Since Mrs. C is vertically challenged the top shelves are “mine”. If all of the cooks are vertically challenged the top shelf is still useful for storing rarely used items.

 

We were out of town and it was such a pleasant surprise to log in to eGullet and see you blogging! I look forward to following along with you the rest of this week.

 

Keep up the good work!


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#75 Smithy

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 01:09 AM

rotuts, I'm howling with laughter; that cartoon is very definitely "feed me" related and true to all four of our cats!  Our Siberian husky is less subtle. it's a miracle he hasn't stuck his nose into the photos before now.  I'll send you more information by PM; I'm always happy to talk about "my kids".

 

C. Sapidus, how nice of you to check in!  That's funny about the cabinets.  My darling and I have both lived in places without that grease-attracting gap above cabinets, and we both preferred to keep it open for display/storage...grease notwithstanding.  It takes a stepladder for either of us to reach something up there, so anything we use frequently that can fit into a lower cabinet lives there instead.  Your comment about grease accumulating despite a good hood makes me feel a bit better about our arrangement; maybe it isn't all that bad after all.  

 

My fears about the roasting pan being overfilled were unfounded.

 

Cooked down nicely.jpg

 

In addition to the chicken we had brussels sprouts with bacon, and beverage of our choice.  He prefers beer with dinner.

 

Dinner.jpg


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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#76 Smithy

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 07:31 AM

Do your knives also go into the dishwasher, or are they an exception to the "no handwashing" rule?

I have one 9 1/2" chef's knife that I hand-wash. I only use it for veggie prep. All other knives go into the dishwasher. My machine has a 6 comparment cutlery tray built into the door. I only put one knife in each of the 3 sections I use for knives so that they don't bang against each other. My other 9 1/2" chef's knife, which I have had for 30 years, does go in the dishwasher. The two 9 1/2" are from the same maker, long out of business. I sharpen all of my knives on my EdgePro and have never had issues with the dishwasher affecting them. I spent 16 years in the corrosion monitoring industry so I have some insight as to what could happen.
 

attachicon.gifIMAG0345.jpg

Corrosion monitoring, eh? You're the perfect person to ask, then: is it just the knives' being banged around that's hard on them? I'd gotten the idea that the dishwasher detergent could pit them. Does the type of detergent and the water chemistry change the answer?

Feel free to PM me if the answer is too long - but I bet there are a lot of others here who would also be interested.
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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#77 Porthos

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 08:44 AM

Corrosion monitoring, eh? You're the perfect person to ask, then: is it just the knives' being banged around that's hard on them? I'd gotten the idea that the dishwasher detergent could pit them. Does the type of detergent and the water chemistry change the answer?

Banging around is hard on any knife. With other dishwashers we have owned I put my knives in the top rack to avoid that.  This model negates that need.

 

I have used Cascade detergent only forever. If there was going to be pitting, of which common wisdom seems to be the the thing to be feared, I would have seen pitting by now. Since I only use the one brand I can not speak as to what could happen using other detergents. I also use a heated drying cycle so the surface moisture is removed at the end of the cleaning cycle.

 

FYI: I was in the electronics end of the business but you can't be immersed in it without learning the basics of the various corrosion mechanisms. Two of my hunting partners made their living on the chemistry end of corrosion so I was also exposed to many conversations about real-world effects.

 

Edited to add: I only own stainless steel knives.


Edited by Porthos, 15 January 2014 - 08:45 AM.

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Porthos Potwatcher
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"If every pork chop was perfect, we wouldn't have hot dogs." (source unknown)
Customer to clerk in a clothing store, "Do you have these in a size for people who actually eat?"


#78 MelissaH

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 11:08 AM

 

<snip>

 

Making the pierogi is women's work at the church, although the cooking on the day of the festival is strictly men's work. Another thing that's strictly men's work is coring the cabbages for the golabki, with an electric drill and large bit! I think the first year I helped was the first time I'd ever seen a power tool repurposed for kitchen work.

 

Smithy, you have a nice array of international cuisine sections in your supermarket. Is the population as diverse?

 

 

I love the idea of using power tools to deal with kitchen chores.  As I recall, you use a lathe to peel winter squash, do you not?

 

I think of Duluth's population as still being pretty homogenous: European ancestry, for the most part: Scandinavian, Germanic, Slavic, British Isles, based on the faces I see in the grocery store.  However, the populations of the university and colleges here are quite mixed, as are the staff of the medical facilities: with 2 major hospital chains and I-don't-know-how many clinics, the medical practice accounts for a lot of employment around here.

 

Unfortunately the demand for international cuisine hasn't been enough to keep any sort of specialty store afloat, except for a couple of Italian groceries that have been around here forever.  (Italian immigrants were a major wave early in the last century.) The Oriental grocery died several years ago, I believe a victim of the general economic slump that hit us all around 2008.  There's never been a good Middle Eastern or Indian grocery store here.  I'm glad that Cub and Mt. Royal, my other favorite large grocery store here (still to be visited this week) are meeting the demand.

 

I do, in fact, use a lathe to peel butternut squash, my favorite of the winter squashes. HUGE time-saver, if I'm doing more than one squash, but not so good on the ridged varieties like acorns.

 

My corner of upstate NY is also pretty homogenous. I wouldn't be surprised if, around here, a mixed marriage consisted of someone from a family attending St. Stephen's, the Polish Catholic church, wedding someone from a family attending St. Mary's, the Italian Catholic church. (To say nothing of the other two Catholic churches still in town, or the three that have been closed since before we moved here. But, like Duluth but on a smaller scale, we also have a university and a hospital, which help a little. We had a Filipino grocer for a brief moment, started by one of the doctors who was Filipino, but she passed away suddenly and the store subsequently closed. If we can't find what we're looking for at the one big supermarket left in town (I'm looking at you, hot salsa!), we need to go to either Syracuse (an hour away) or Rochester (an hour and a half) for an Oriental, Indian, or Middle Eastern grocer.

 

How far would you have to drive? Is it close enough that you're willing to do so, or do you resort to mail order or just go without?


MelissaH
Oswego, NY
Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

#79 judiu

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 11:41 AM

Melissa, making your own salsa is quick, easy, tasty and it's possible to clear the house of unwanted company, depending on the peppers you use! %) PM me if you'd like recipes, my late hubby used to make it, but because I have a tender mouth, I don't eat it.
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#80 Smithy

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 11:46 AM

I do, in fact, use a lathe to peel butternut squash, my favorite of the winter squashes. HUGE time-saver, if I'm doing more than one squash, but not so good on the ridged varieties like acorns.
 
My corner of upstate NY is also pretty homogenous. I wouldn't be surprised if, around here, a mixed marriage consisted of someone from a family attending St. Stephen's, the Polish Catholic church, wedding someone from a family attending St. Mary's, the Italian Catholic church. (To say nothing of the other two Catholic churches still in town, or the three that have been closed since before we moved here. But, like Duluth but on a smaller scale, we also have a university and a hospital, which help a little. We had a Filipino grocer for a brief moment, started by one of the doctors who was Filipino, but she passed away suddenly and the store subsequently closed. If we can't find what we're looking for at the one big supermarket left in town (I'm looking at you, hot salsa!), we need to go to either Syracuse (an hour away) or Rochester (an hour and a half) for an Oriental, Indian, or Middle Eastern grocer.
 
How far would you have to drive? Is it close enough that you're willing to do so, or do you resort to mail order or just go without?


Garrison Keillor often makes jokes like that about a "mixed marriage" in Lake Wobegon being between Lutherans and Catholics.

As far as I know, I'd have to drive to the Twin Cities (Minneapolis/St. Paul) to find a Middle Eastern, Oriental, Mexican or Indian grocery store. That's around 3 hours from here, so I resort to mail order or else stocking up when I'm passing by a convenient store. Woe is me, my favorite mail-order place seems to have folded. Flavor of the Med (Flavorofmed.com) is the only source I've found for Greenland feta cheese, an Egyptian creamy feta packed in tetrapcks. Alas, their web site is down and they aren't answering my calls or emails. (If anyone reading this knows of another source, please PM me.) I may have to do without that cheese.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#81 Smithy

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 12:17 PM

One of the things we did when we remodeled the kitchen was solve some thorny storage problems,  Corner storage is always an issue: our old cabinets had a blind corner with an open space, out of sight, between the end of one set of shelves and the under-sink storage.  The cats loved it.  I found a food mill that the previous owners had probably long since lost.  One of my priorities was to use that space better.  

 

Ta-Da!  Turntables in the corners!  The lower corner has larger-radius turntables with a corner cutout.  I didn't bother attaching a photo, but I'll show it if someone asks.

 

Upper corner.jpg

 

We also made good use of pullout storage.  The waste baskets (3: 1 for trash, 1 for paper recycling, and 1 for other recyclables) sit in one pullout rack.  Many cutting boards and baking sheets, as well as those countertop drain pads, occupy another.

 

Pullout storage.jpg

 

The pots and pans, and small electric appliances, are on rollout shelves.  I love being able to roll out a whole shelf and grab what I want, instead of having to dig to the back of a cabinet.


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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#82 Smithy

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 12:24 PM

Tonight we're having friends over for dinner and a movie, so the meal plan involves a lot of finger food and the fixings for sandwiches.  I generally make bread by hand these days, but on days like this when we're trying to thaw frozen water pipes (!) it's nice to just throw stuff into the machine.  This bread machine cookbook is still one of my favorites.  In the machine are the makings of "Rita Fried's Garlic Herb Bread".

 

Bread set to go.jpg

 

My Old World Meats tri-tip is waiting to begin cooking.  I'll be trying out a protocol set out by America's Test Kitchen in an edX course on the Science of Food and Cooking:  sear quickly, then cook very very low and slow.  At times like this I wonder if sous vide is in my future.

 

Here it is, in its original package.  I was a bit surprised to get it home and find they hadn't cut it themselves, but I think demand must have risen enough that they order it specially.

 

Tri-tip.jpg


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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#83 rotuts

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 12:33 PM

""  sous vide is in my future ""

 

its well worth looking into, esp. if you have a freezer and get periodic sales of meat(s) you would normally buy.


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#84 rotuts

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 12:50 PM

ps   the Anova is the game changer here, making it much easier to get a 'set-up' w min fuss.



#85 Smithy

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 12:54 PM

ps   the Anova is the game changer here, making it much easier to get a 'set-up' w min fuss.


Thanks for that, rotuts. I've been following the topic about the reviews. Very interesting!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#86 gfweb

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 01:22 PM

ps   the Anova is the game changer here, making it much easier to get a 'set-up' w min fuss.

Fair price, easy storage...great addition


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#87 annabelle

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 04:27 PM

Smithy, we have the same set up in our corner cabinet:  large lazy susans in the lower cabinet and  smaller lazy susans in the upper cabinet.  I keep my spices in the upper cupboard (I have them alphabetized because I'm like that).  I wish we had pull-out storage.

 

Is that a Kohler faucet?  It looks like mine, but I have a different sink made of a compound of some kind and extra deep.  We got rid of our old porcelain sink when we did the granite countertops.

 

Great blog!  I love your well behaved cats, too.



#88 rotuts

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 05:06 PM

BTW:  serious Kudos on those Splash Guards on your counter tops

 

people are a bit stretched on their costs when the splash guards come up

 

they are not cheeeeep

 

best investment one can make   3 " or more.

 

just saying.



#89 ElsieD

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 05:16 PM

Ta-Da!  Turntables in the corners!  The lower corner has larger-radius turntables with a corner cutout.  I didn't bother attaching a photo, but I'll show it if someone asks.

 
If it's not too much trouble, I would like to see a picture of this. We are moving into a condo next week that has three of these corner cupboards and i'm trying to find out what would make the contents more accessible.

PS I also like the pictures of your kitties.

Edited by heidih, 15 January 2014 - 05:18 PM.
Fix quote tags


#90 dcarch

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 06:43 PM

Enjoying you blogg so far. Thanks.

 

I like the center island in your kitchen. It has plenty of electric outlets. Good planning.

 

dcarch


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