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Foodblog: Smithy - Notes from the land of Cheap Refrigeration


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#31 Smithy

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 05:18 PM

I mentioned earlier that lunch is usually as predictable as breakfast.  This is because one of our strategies for keeping weight down (and allowing us to do most of our splurging in the evening) is to have a container of green salad ready to go.  If one of us is very hungry (as I was after shoveling and chopping ice today) and there isn't a salad ready, then it's likely to be chunks of cheese or leftovers or some other more fattening food.  Today, in fact, I settled for rosemary bread smeared with cheese while I was preparing the salad.

 

Here are the fixings, before being rinsed, drained, chopped and so on:

 

Salad fixings.jpg

 

And here's the container of salad, ready for several days' meals:

 

Salad for the week.jpg

 

We add cherry tomatoes, olives and croutons as we see fit, and have our own preferred salad dressings.  The tub-worth stays crisp thanks to having been washed, well-drained, and sealed.  (My darling was worried that I'm showing the seamy underside of our food habits: salad for several days at once! Oh, the horror!)


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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

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#32 Shelby

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 05:19 PM

Also, we have the exact same counter top, fridge, and cabinets!   I called my husband over to see and he asked if you lived here in Kansas :)

 

Side question:  How do you keep the tops of your cabinets clean?  I am at a loss.  Ours are are unsanded plywood on the top ( yeah, sigh)  Cleaning is impossible.



#33 Smithy

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 05:22 PM

In my dream kitchen, I've always wanted one of the overhead pot/skillet hangers….however, after I realized how much grease, dirt and gunk accumulates on my overhead lights, I nixed the idea.  Very smart and pretty where you hang yours!  I love it.

 

In fact, grease and gunk do accumulate atop the overhead cabinets. but not as badly as I think they'd accumulate on low-hanging skillets.  One thing I'd do over if I could would be to install an exhaust vent that vents OUTSIDE.  I figured out how to do it about halfway through the remodeling project, when it was too late.  It can still be done without too much time and expense, but we'll have to line up the contractor again and have time home to make it happen.  The second choice would be to have the range hood (it's built into the microwave) vent FORWARD instead of UP.  Everyone assured me that it made no difference which way it vented.  They were wrong.


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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#34 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 05:27 PM

Also, we have the exact same counter top, fridge, and cabinets!   I called my husband over to see and he asked if you lived here in Kansas :)

 

Side question:  How do you keep the tops of your cabinets clean?  I am at a loss.  Ours are are unsanded plywood on the top ( yeah, sigh)  Cleaning is impossible.

 

Shelby and Smithy, could you line the tops with drawer liner? It's smooth, so wipes clean.


Edited by Plantes Vertes, 12 January 2014 - 05:28 PM.


#35 Shelby

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 05:33 PM

 

Also, we have the exact same counter top, fridge, and cabinets!   I called my husband over to see and he asked if you lived here in Kansas :)

 

Side question:  How do you keep the tops of your cabinets clean?  I am at a loss.  Ours are are unsanded plywood on the top ( yeah, sigh)  Cleaning is impossible.

 

Shelby and Smithy, could you line the tops with drawer liner? It's smooth, so wipes clean.

 

That's a great idea, but there are more obstacles.  My contractor installed lights and electrical outlets on the top of my cabinets, so it's not a smooth, plain surface.

 

Believe me, if I could have a do-over, I'd do a lot different.

 

 

Sorry to hijack you, Nancy!!!!



#36 Blether

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 06:52 PM

... Blether, thanks for the suggestion. I don't usually get whole fish but it sounds like a good idea. Would you use aromatics in that stock? If so, which?

 

 

Well, as you are already doing, of course you can adapt as you like, so as to get close to that Egyptian original, or according to your mood.  Given that you're using water as it is, I expect you'll find a simple fish stock alone will make quite a difference.  Generally if I'm doing one I'll think about black pepper, bay, white wine.  Maybe some zest from those lemons ?  Of course you can go the extra mile and add onion/celery/carrot.

 

Typically the fishmonger will charge you for the filleting, and you might find you can get the whole fish for less than the two sides.  But if your seafood options are limited, maybe you can get clam juice ?


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#37 heidih

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 07:29 PM

Assisting Smithy here - post of her before kitchen

http://forums.egulle...e-2#entry993614
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#38 andiesenji

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 08:56 PM

The only time I had cabinets with a free space at the top, I also had a huge Garland range and although I had an industrial-grade exhaust hoot, there was still plenty of grease floating around. 

Our painter recommended that he coat the cabinets, especially the tops (which were out of sight) with clear, high-gloss epoxy finish, putting on two coats, with a final polish with steel wool and a paste like jewelers rouge. 

The result was a finish that didn't exactly repel grease, but it wiped off with just a damp cloth, no soap. 

 

That was back in the early '70s and I am sure there have been great improvements in paint technology since then.  It might save some grief to at least look into it. 


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#39 Smithy

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 09:34 PM

Also, we have the exact same counter top, fridge, and cabinets!   I called my husband over to see and he asked if you lived here in Kansas :)
 
Side question:  How do you keep the tops of your cabinets clean?  I am at a loss.  Ours are are unsanded plywood on the top ( yeah, sigh)  Cleaning is impossible.

 
I think that's very cool that we picked the same granite! Did you buy it under the name of "Cosmic" or "Cosmic Blue" (I heard both) or is that a local vendor name?

More on the cabinet tops below.

 



Also, we have the exact same counter top, fridge, and cabinets!   I called my husband over to see and he asked if you lived here in Kansas :)
 
Side question:  How do you keep the tops of your cabinets clean?  I am at a loss.  Ours are are unsanded plywood on the top ( yeah, sigh)  Cleaning is impossible.

 
Shelby and Smithy, could you line the tops with drawer liner? It's smooth, so wipes clean.
 

That's a great idea. As it happens, the tops of my cabinets have a smooth finish - basically the same as the faces and sides - so they clean easily with something like Pledge, once I get up there and take everything down (rolls eyes). Then I have to thoroughly wash everything that was sitting atop the cabinets, because of course those things are just as greasy.

The only time I had cabinets with a free space at the top, I also had a huge Garland range and although I had an industrial-grade exhaust hoot, there was still plenty of grease floating around. 
Our painter recommended that he coat the cabinets, especially the tops (which were out of sight) with clear, high-gloss epoxy finish, putting on two coats, with a final polish with steel wool and a paste like jewelers rouge. 
The result was a finish that didn't exactly repel grease, but it wiped off with just a damp cloth, no soap. 
 
That was back in the early '70s and I am sure there have been great improvements in paint technology since then.  It might save some grief to at least look into it.

That's interesting, that even an industrial-grade hood didn't capture everything. Maybe I'll stop whingeing about it. In the meantime, the finish does clean easily...but everything else has to come off to be cleaned as well. On the other hand, it's a good motivation to have parties so that stuff has to come down. Can't put appetizers out on greasy plates, ya know. ;-) That's more or less my housecleaning plan: have company over so I have to clean up.
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

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#40 Smithy

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 09:58 PM

Assisting Smithy here - post of her before kitchenhttp://forums.egulle...e-2#entry993614


Thanks, heidih!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#41 Smithy

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 11:43 PM

Well!  Well, well, well!  

 

Ravioli tonight, to mixed success.  The recipe is "Cappellacci di zucca" (Large ravioli with winter squash) from the above-mentioned "Sauces and Shapes" book.  I made the egg pasta dough (pasta all'uovo) from the same book, and tossed it with Burro al salvia (melted butter and fresh sage), also from this book.

 

Ravioli fixings.jpg

 

As with almost anything worth doing, there's a learning curve, and I've just barely started up the slope called "stuffed pasta".  The dough was time-consuming but not difficult; I've worked to make pasta dough enough now that I can feel when it's developing the proper texture, and make adjustments when necessary.  I don't have the hang of gauging the amount of filling for the size ravioli I plan.  As a result, I ended up slicing the ravioli with a knife instead of using the intended stamp; even then, one split and lost its filling to the water.  In fairness, I'll note that the recipe calls for making free-form cappellacci - essentially, making a square, setting some filling into the middle, and folding opposite corners together to make a rough triangle.  It sounds simple, but to date my attempts at making free-form stuffed pasta have been too ludicrous for words.  I opted to test the recipe and flavor balance and not worry about the ravioli form.

 

Ravioli in progress.jpg Raviolis.jpg

 

The biggest, most lovely revelation of the entire night was melted butter with sage.  Where have I been all this time?  That's a wonderful flavor combination, and one I won't forget.  By the time the sage leaves had cooked in the butter they were crisp, to the point that I wouldn't have dreamed of removing them.  They added a nice texture to the meal when encountered, and a pleasant color as well.  

 

Ravioli dinner.jpg

 

I think the consensus of the household is that we prefer things a bit more savory, and the squash/cheese/egg filling was too sweet and, er, not meaty or savory enough.  Setting these ravioli up in a sauce containing meat, or perhaps including some meat with the filling (I don't know how) was the suggestion before the evening closed down.  I'd call the meal a qualified success, with suggestions for improvement to meet our tastes to come along later.  But oh boy, that sage butter!   :wub:

 

Last ravioli closer.jpg


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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#42 heidih

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 11:50 PM

Ah - fresh sage leaves and butter (or good oil) are magical as you found :)
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#43 Meredith380

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 12:30 AM

Yummy!! Sausage seems like a perfect idea in the ravioli filling!
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#44 andiesenji

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 01:11 AM

Your ravioli look fine to me.   Plain squash or pumpkin is too sweet for my taste also.  Do you every make duxelles?  I make a batch every two or three months and freeze it.  I mix it with the cooked squash - 2/3 squash, 1/3 duxelles for a savory filling in ravioli and empanadas.  You can add a bit of shredded meat before adding the top of the pasta. 

 

With soft, squishy fillings, I use a manual cookie press (because of arthritis in my hand I can't grip a pastry bag) because it it much easier to gauge how much I am applying to the bottom pastry.  I also have a ravioli mold or "plate" which makes the task a lot easier.  Most of the presses have a large 3/4 inch cone which dispenses just the right-sized dollop of filling.


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#45 Anna N

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 03:19 AM

Thank you. Love your kitchen because it just seems designed for cooking not merely for admiring. Those readily available skillets and stockpots are an invitation to start cooking. And the big bin salad ----brilliant.
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#46 Smithy

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 07:53 AM

Your ravioli look fine to me.   Plain squash or pumpkin is too sweet for my taste also.  Do you every make duxelles?  I make a batch every two or three months and freeze it.  I mix it with the cooked squash - 2/3 squash, 1/3 duxelles for a savory filling in ravioli and empanadas.  You can add a bit of shredded meat before adding the top of the pasta. 
 
With soft, squishy fillings, I use a manual cookie press (because of arthritis in my hand I can't grip a pastry bag) because it it much easier to gauge how much I am applying to the bottom pastry.  I also have a ravioli mold or "plate" which makes the task a lot easier.  Most of the presses have a large 3/4 inch cone which dispenses just the right-sized dollop of filling.


Duxelles are a great idea for this.

I have a ravioli mold that makes smaller pieces, maybe 2x2 inch instead of the 3x3 I was shooting for. It makes for a more orderly looking product. The raviolini attachment to my pasta maker didn't really get a good seal the time I tried it. Maybe my filling was too sloppy. What about the rollling pins with ridges? They look fun but ineffective to me, but I've never seen one in action.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#47 Shelby

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 08:46 AM

I think your pasta looks delicious!  I haven't made fresh for so long.  It's time I did it again.  What do you do with your leftovers, or did you make just enough dough to use for one meal?


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#48 MelissaH

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 09:22 AM

I now have a beautiful, smooth squash puree thanks to a food mill. It seems a bit moist. The recipe says to use bread crumbs to thicken if necessary, but since I just realized I'm out of Parmesan cheese <scowl> I'm letting it drain prior to being put away for now. Actually it's too late for me to start messing with mixing fresh pasta dough and forming the raviolis tonight, anyway; I'm slow enough at all this that I tend to make the filling one day and use it a day or two later.

I'm reminded of the ladies who make the pierogi at St. Stephen's Church here in Oswego. Every day of the week leading up to their big festival, they make one kind of pierogi, and one filling. First, they make the dough (usually three or four food processors and stand mixers going at a time), set each batch aside to rest for a moment, and pass a batch of rested dough on to someone else to roll it out and cut circles. The circles get placed on parchment-lined sheet pans, and sent on to the tables of fillers. The fillers take the balls of filling that were made yesterday, place each ball onto a dough circle, pinch the edges shut, and put the filled pierogi back onto the sheet pan. The pans then go to a checker, who checks that no filling has crept into the seal (which would result in the pierog opening in the boiling pot) and fixes any potential problems, and then put in the freezer to wait for the festival. When the day's batch is complete (meaning all the dough balls have been sealed into dough), the next day's filling gets mixed and scooped with a disher into individual balls, which are put on parchment lined sheet pans and frozen. The freezing helps to keep the filling in a rounded shape, which in turn keeps it away from the edges when the dough gets pinched shut so the pierogi stay properly sealed in the cooking process. Doing it the day before also helps to expedite the assembly line, because the filling becomes grab-and-go and because the dough makers will know exactly how many batches of dough they need to make that day, for the complete batch. The pierogi stay frozen until the festival, when they get boiled and then fried. They'll also sell them frozen, for people to take home and cook later.

 

I wonder if a similar methodology of freezing ravioli filling in dollops would help to expedite your process?


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#49 Smithy

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 10:16 AM

I think your pasta looks delicious!  I haven't made fresh for so long.  It's time I did it again.  What do you do with your leftovers, or did you make just enough dough to use for one meal?


I made a half-batch of dough, and used about 2/3 of it. The remainder is wrapped tightly in plastic wrap, and stored in the refrigerator. Sometimes in past batches I've gotten round to using the remainder in the next day or two, with no apparent deterioration in quality. At other times I've had that extra sitting in the fridge for 2 weeks, and finally decided that I had no plans for it, and thrown it away despite misgivings about wasting food.

When I made a half-batch of dough last night, however, I forgot that I'd made a full batch of filling! I think I'll be trying MelissaH's suggestion.
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

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#50 Smithy

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 10:18 AM

I now have a beautiful, smooth squash puree thanks to a food mill. It seems a bit moist. The recipe says to use bread crumbs to thicken if necessary, but since I just realized I'm out of Parmesan cheese <scowl> I'm letting it drain prior to being put away for now. Actually it's too late for me to start messing with mixing fresh pasta dough and forming the raviolis tonight, anyway; I'm slow enough at all this that I tend to make the filling one day and use it a day or two later.

I'm reminded of the ladies who make the pierogi at St. Stephen's Church here in Oswego. Every day of the week leading up to their big festival, they make one kind of pierogi, and one filling. First, they make the dough (usually three or four food processors and stand mixers going at a time), set each batch aside to rest for a moment, and pass a batch of rested dough on to someone else to roll it out and cut circles. The circles get placed on parchment-lined sheet pans, and sent on to the tables of fillers. The fillers take the balls of filling that were made yesterday, place each ball onto a dough circle, pinch the edges shut, and put the filled pierogi back onto the sheet pan. The pans then go to a checker, who checks that no filling has crept into the seal (which would result in the pierog opening in the boiling pot) and fixes any potential problems, and then put in the freezer to wait for the festival. When the day's batch is complete (meaning all the dough balls have been sealed into dough), the next day's filling gets mixed and scooped with a disher into individual balls, which are put on parchment lined sheet pans and frozen. The freezing helps to keep the filling in a rounded shape, which in turn keeps it away from the edges when the dough gets pinched shut so the pierogi stay properly sealed in the cooking process. Doing it the day before also helps to expedite the assembly line, because the filling becomes grab-and-go and because the dough makers will know exactly how many batches of dough they need to make that day, for the complete batch. The pierogi stay frozen until the festival, when they get boiled and then fried. They'll also sell them frozen, for people to take home and cook later.
 
I wonder if a similar methodology of freezing ravioli filling in dollops would help to expedite your process?

Great idea, and thanks for the evocative description of the St. Stephens assembly line!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#51 judiu

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 08:53 PM

Nancy, I think that leftover ham, minced fine, might have a place in your ravoli, and maybe some onion, too.
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#52 Smithy

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 09:03 PM

Nancy, I think that leftover ham, minced fine, might have a place in your ravoli, and maybe some onion, too.

 

Thanks for that suggestion, judiu!  I think I'll use it on the remainder of the squash filling.


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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#53 Smithy

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 10:06 PM

Ufda.

 

Today was not much for eating, much less for cookery. We spent much of the morning using an evil implement called a "roof rake", trying to ease the snow load on one of our outbuildings.  Eventually we figured out how to "work smarter, not harder", but it was still mid-afternoon before we stopped.  The standard breakfast occupied one rest break; lunch involved the last ravioli from last night and, er, I forget what else. 

 

Once we'd called it a day on (note that I did not say "finished") the outside chores we set out for the day's errands.  The plan had been to allow 5 hours and be home before 5 p.m; the reality crammed them into 3 hours and got us home by 6.  I still managed to snap some photos during our shopping.

 

I briefly entertained the notion of a parody along the line of "The Twelve Days of Christmas" for Duluth's great food and kitchen stores: "Three grand grocers", "Two great charcuteries" and so on, to celebrate the expansion of wonderful groceries, butcher shops and even kitchen stores since I moved here.  I decided I couldn't make the numbers work.  Here, without further ado, are the places we visited today.

 

Old World Meats is in its third generation of family owners/operators, and they keep expanding and improving. 

Old World Meats exterior.jpg

 

They've remodeled and reworked the space, just since last October.

 

OWM 1.jpg

 

 Instead of a couple of cluttered aisles where home sausage-makers could buy their spices and supplies (I forgot to ask where those items are now kept) they've expanded the island for their cured meats, and set up a charcuterie section to show off their excellent sausages, spicy beef sticks, and smoked foods.

 

OWM Charcuterie.jpg

OWM Sticks.jpg

OWM Smoked.jpg

 

Their meat counter is something to behold.  

 

OWM Steaks.jpg

 

Back in 2005 there was an eGullet Culinary Institute short course on braising; that's when I started getting to know the fellows here.  I've been a regular ever since.   These are the people who can get a specific cut and/or advise you on how to cook it.  They smoke meats and fish, mix sausage, and have strong opinions about how to cook their products...if, but only if, you ask.

 

They also have a great fish counter.  Today, however, the  display case was atypically empty due to a heavy deep cleaning when they "knew business would be slow".  Trust me: you can usually get good fresh salmon and halibut there, and you can often also get scallops, shrimp, or fish that I can't remember because I'm not particularly interested in it.

 

We picked up some smoked salmon, upon which I hadn't planned, along with the pre-arranged tri-tips.  More about those in a later post.

 

One of our favorite grocery stores here is technically part of a chain, but its counterparts are all far south: Minneapolis, St. Paul, and those areas.  Cub Foods was a big breath of fresh air when it first arrived up here, and it gets much of our business.  

 

Cub Exterior.jpg

 

Over the years, as subject to market pressure as any other place, they've expanded their produce areas

 

Cub Peppers.jpg Cub Produce.jpg

 

added to their inventory to accommodate multiple cuisines

 

Cub Ethnic.jpg

 

expanded their deli area

 

Cub Cheese.jpg

 

and allowed other ways for us to spend entirely too much money.  We picked up items for a dinner party in a couple of days, and continued our rounds.

 

Cub Crackers.jpg Cub Flowers.jpg

 

When we FINALLY got home, we enjoyed the crystalline quality of moonlight over a snowy landscape, as seen from a hot tub, 

 

...then enjoyed reheated pork roast and sauerkraut, from last week's crockpot cookery.  I'll post photos if anyone wishes, but it was much more tasty than pretty.  Think beige.  Then think savory, salty and juicy.


Edited by Smithy, 13 January 2014 - 10:21 PM.

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"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#54 brucesw

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 10:25 PM

Lovin' your blog, Smithy.  That meat market looks like a real gem.



#55 rotuts

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 06:55 AM

"""   Old World Meats  """

 

Im just dying here ....

 

"""   Cub Foods  """

 

looks just like the spot Alton Brown used to shop at in Atlanta or somewhere on Good Eats 

 

still dying ....

 

wait ....   its 50 degrees here

 

:biggrin: 



#56 Smithy

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 09:54 AM

"""   Old World Meats  """

 

Im just dying here ....

 

"""   Cub Foods  """

 

looks just like the spot Alton Brown used to shop at in Atlanta or somewhere on Good Eats 

 

still dying ....

 

wait ....   its 50 degrees here

 

:biggrin: 

 

:laugh:

 

Tues 10 am temp.jpg


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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#57 Smithy

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 10:17 AM

My darling's breakfast is generally fruit salad with whole-grain Cheerios.  Just as with the green salad I showed, we find it works best to make several days' worth in advance and store it for ready access.  Here are the fixings:

 

Fruit salad fixings.jpg

 

The berries, grapes and pineapple were purchased at Cub Foods yesterday.  The oranges and dates we brought back with us from California.  He's less fussy than I about fruit in season and has absolutely no qualms about buying it from wherever he can get it (the grapes are from Peru).  I have qualms about some such items: for instance, I just can't bring myself to buy stone fruits at this time of year because it's an insult to the real deal...but the fresh fruit does help brighten our diet, and he's firmly in the "any port in a storm" camp of winter survival.  

 

Actually, the strawberries look and taste surprisingly good this time: red through, not too soft, but they have good flavor.

 

Strawberries and cutting board.jpg

 

The finished salad fills a 3-quart mixing bowl.  He'll fill a 2-quart plastic storage tub with some of it, and apportion the rest into smaller containers, ready to receive the cereal.

 

Fruit salad closeup.jpg

 

When we first started this fruit-salad-in-advance plan we made smaller batches so it wouldn't rot, but we've learned that the pineapple juice, all of which goes into the salad, does 2 things: it seems to help preserve the fruit quality, and it prevents the navel oranges from going bitter as they sit.  When there's no pineapple to be had, another stratagem is to use fruit juice as the base for a fruit-salad gelatin.  The gelatin helps keep the fruit fresh.  A gelatin made from freshly squeezed mandarin oranges, or minneola tangelos, or an orange-lemon mix, is a wonderful thing. 

 

 


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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#58 Smithy

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 10:23 AM

This bamboo cutting board is a new acquisition: $10 from Smart and Final, and I've been admiring the beauty of these babies for a while.

 

Cutting board and sink.jpg

 

Today was the first time I used it.  I cleaned it before use, but as I cut the strawberries I started noticing that it was taking a stain from the berries and a strange odor was coming up.  It doesn't seem to have affected the flavor but I stopped using it and went back to one of my flexible cutting mats - which are, actually, more practical for this operation, despite the admonitions that plastic is hard on knives.

 

Should I have cleaned and sealed the bamboo board better?  How?  My plan, unless I hear otherwise from some experienced person, is to do the standard butcher block treatment: salt and vinegar, scrape, then rub with mineral oil.  This board came with a $1-off coupon for the company's special sealant, but I can't see spending $12 on a special treatment for a $10 board.  


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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#59 rotuts

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 10:29 AM

I have a similar bamboo board.  I just scrub it w teflon scrubbing pad and dry it.

 

I have it a long while and nothing bad has happened.

 

i not a fan of plain mineral oil.  I dont feel it does much of anything. maybe adds 'shine'

 

PS  they do stain, esp w cut darker fruit.

 

if thats a concern, a little 50 % hot bleach and a scrubbie does the trick.

 

the rinse

 

dont get that on yourself, your counter or your clothes !


Edited by rotuts, 14 January 2014 - 10:43 AM.

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#60 Porthos

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 10:45 AM

Smithy, I am enjoying this blog. I also followed your princess camping stories.

 

This bamboo cutting board is a new acquisition: $10 from Smart and Final, and I've been admiring the beauty of these babies for a while. 

I am rather anal about having only plastic cutting boards in my kitchen. I am very big on everything being able to go into the dishwasher.  I purchased a bamboo board a few years ago. I rarely used it because of my aversion to hand-washing. It finally went to a thrift shop. (The aversion is to hand-washing as the final cleaning. I pre-scrub everything before it goes into the dishwasher. Maybe if I had a 3-compartment sink in my kitchen...)

 

I also got a chuckle out of recognizing the mixing bowl you used. I have them in multiples in 3qt through 8 qt plus a14 qt. Are yours Tramontina or another brand?


Edited by Porthos, 14 January 2014 - 10:49 AM.

Porthos Potwatcher
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"If every pork chop was perfect, we wouldn't have hot dogs." (source unknown)
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