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Dinner! 2013 (Part 2)


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#61 Keith_W

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 08:46 PM

Antwaan, I love your food, but I think you might benefit from checking your camera settings. All your photos look at least one stop underexposed to me. Check your exposure compensation and make sure you haven't left it at -1 by accident. If you need help, send me a PM :)
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#62 SobaAddict70

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 11:13 PM

rotuts -- love that rendition of fried rice. I can just taste it.

c. sapidus -- you just reminded me I need to restock my lentils so I can make some dal later in the week. "curry" has that memory trigger for me.

tonight:

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Fried oysters, frisée salad, beet vinaigrette

Frisée salad -- frisée, pistachios, beets, Bulgarian feta cheese, beet vinaigrette. Bulgarian feta cheese is 95% sheep's milk, 5% goat's milk.

Beet vinaigrette -- 1 tablespoon beet vinegar (beet peels from 3 or more cooked large beets, 1/2 cup red wine vinegar; let peels steep in vinegar for 1-2 weeks or longer); 2 tablespoons Cara Cara orange juice reduction (see below); 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil; sea salt and black pepper to taste.

Cara Cara orange juice reduction -- juice of a Cara Cara orange, reduced to half its volume over low heat ; into this was whisked 1 tablespoon unsalted butter.

The oysters were dipped in seasoned flour (all-purpose flour, sea salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper), then fried in olive oil.

A little bit more complicated than what I usually make. Doable in about 30 minutes, not including prep. The beet vinegar takes 2 weeks steeping time; the beets can be cooked in advance.


Next:

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Cornish game hen, roasted winter root vegetables

Cornish game hen -- sea salt and black pepper seasoned liberally inside and outside, then stuffed with quartered lemons, shallots and thyme; roasted at 425 F for 30 minutes, then 350 F for 30 minutes.

Vegetables consist of brussels sprouts, turnips, rutabaga, carrots, heirloom potatoes and shallots; seasoned with sea salt, black pepper, olive oil and thyme.

Wine sauce -- pan drippings, unsalted butter, white wine.



#63 rod rock

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 04:24 AM

Soba, did you put some Vinegar in Frisée salad? It looks very nice but i'm wondering if vinegar goes nice with it.
Thanks!


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#64 SobaAddict70

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 08:08 AM

rod rock -- yes, there's 1 tablespoon beet vinegar in the vinaigrette, along with a bunch of other things...

 

the Cara Cara OJ reduction lends sweetness, the butter increases "mouthfeel" and the olive oil binds everything together.


Edited by SobaAddict70, 05 March 2013 - 08:10 AM.


#65 Kim Shook

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 10:25 AM

Patrick – by long cooked beans, I mean Southern beans.  Just green beans with some kind of side meat (jowl, salt pork, ham hocks), a touch of brown sugar, something oniony (I’ve used onions, scallions and even shallots, in a pinch), black pepper and a few red pepper flakes.  What I do is slowly fry the side meat to render a little fat and get it tasty.  I then sauté the onions in the fat until they are browned.  Toss in the rest and cover with water.  I basically boil the hell out of them (adding water as needed) until they are as soft as I want them (I like them very soft – traditional), then lower the heat and let the liquid almost cook out.  Taste them when they are tender to see if they need any salt.  You might depending on what kind of pork you use.  Those broad “Italian” green beans work very well with this method.

 

nickrey – love the anchovy toasts!  And those Scotch eggs are gorgeous!

 

Antwaan – love the "croustifondant"!  I’m sure it is completely beyond my skills, but I fell in love with fondant potatoes on our trip to England and have been thinking about them ever since!

 

Soba – that fried oyster plate looks so delicious.  I’m not a beet fan, but I bet I’d love a vinaigrette made with beet vinegar!

 

I tried two new recipes the other night.  One was from John Besh – a Sloppy Joe slider recipe.  Mr. Kim saw that one on FoodTV and wanted me to make it.  The other was a Cook’s Country recipe for macaroni and cheese w/ tomatoes.  The sliders called for making a sambal mayonnaise, onion rings and the meat sauce.  The sauce included onions, pepper jelly, rice wine vinegar, honey, Creole mustard, Worcestershire sauce, catsup and chopped meat of some sort.  I used leftover pot roast:

med_gallery_3331_114_139154.jpg

 

Loaded up with lettuce, tomato and the onion rings:

med_gallery_3331_114_147191.jpg

 

Plated with the mac and cheese and sauerkraut:

med_gallery_3331_114_104488.jpg

The mac and cheese, as written, was a bit dull.  Jessica suggested that I add some hot sauce, Worcestershire, Dijon and more cheese and that did the trick.  While we loved the sliders, the real knock out was those onion rings:

med_gallery_3331_114_2731.jpg

They weren’t really substantial enough to make the regular onion ring side dish, but they were so easy and so incredibly crisp and good that I know I’ll make them again and again to go with hot sandwiches and steaks.  All you do is slice them thinly, separate the rings, salt them, wait a bit then toss with flour and fry in 350 degree oil. 


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#66 Mr Holloway

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 10:50 AM

Kim: Mac and cheese and sliders would be awsome right now! :smile:

 

 Dinner was just prime rib :laugh:

primerib2.jpg

 

But dessert, was a recipe, we are trying for Eggfest in June

Layer of chunky cookie dough

cookiedough.jpg

Layer of Oreos

layerofcookies.jpg

Top with brownie mix and bake

browniemix.jpg

Frost the top and enjoy, warm with some ice cream

iced.jpg

 

 Shane


Edited by Mr Holloway, 05 March 2013 - 10:52 AM.


#67 judiu

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 12:55 PM

Patrick – by long cooked beans, I mean Southern beans.  Just green beans with some kind of side meat (jowl, salt pork, ham hocks), a touch of brown sugar, something oniony (I’ve used onions, scallions and even shallots, in a pinch), black pepper and a few red pepper flakes.  What I do is slowly fry the side meat to render a little fat and get it tasty.  I then sauté the onions in the fat until they are browned.  Toss in the rest and cover with water.  I basically boil the hell out of them (adding water as needed) until they are as soft as I want them (I like them very soft – traditional), then lower the heat and let the liquid almost cook out.  Taste them when they are tender to see if they need any salt.  You might depending on what kind of pork you use.  Those broad “Italian” green beans work very well with this method.

 

nickrey – love the anchovy toasts!  And those Scotch eggs are gorgeous!

 

Antwaan – love the "croustifondant"!  I’m sure it is completely beyond my skills, but I fell in love with fondant potatoes on our trip to England and have been thinking about them ever since!

 

Soba – that fried oyster plate looks so delicious.  I’m not a beet fan, but I bet I’d love a vinaigrette made with beet vinegar!

 

I tried two new recipes the other night.  One was from John Besh – a Sloppy Joe slider recipe.  Mr. Kim saw that one on FoodTV and wanted me to make it.  The other was a Cook’s Country recipe for macaroni and cheese w/ tomatoes.  The sliders called for making a sambal mayonnaise, onion rings and the meat sauce.  The sauce included onions, pepper jelly, rice wine vinegar, honey, Creole mustard, Worcestershire sauce, catsup and chopped meat of some sort.  I used leftover pot roast:

med_gallery_3331_114_139154.jpg

 

Loaded up with lettuce, tomato and the onion rings:

med_gallery_3331_114_147191.jpg

 

Plated with the mac and cheese and sauerkraut:

med_gallery_3331_114_104488.jpg

The mac and cheese, as written, was a bit dull.  Jessica suggested that I add some hot sauce, Worcestershire, Dijon and more cheese and that did the trick.  While we loved the sliders, the real knock out was those onion rings:

med_gallery_3331_114_2731.jpg

They weren’t really substantial enough to make the regular onion ring side dish, but they were so easy and so incredibly crisp and good that I know I’ll make them again and again to go with hot sandwiches and steaks.  All you do is slice them thinly, separate the rings, salt them, wait a bit then toss with flour and fry in 350 degree oil. 

Kim, there is an easy recipe for fondant potatoes in the yellow Gourmet cook book (as opposed to the green one and the original old one). Those onions, down here in South Florida, are known as "onion shreds" or an "onion cloud". They're great! Ususally, the secret to Mac and Cheese is not only more cheese, but different cheese (usually use Swiss, with holes, as opposed to the American Swiss, which can be best described with a pithy four letter explative, IMHO) and Coleman's Dry Mustard (just a little) for a bit of bite that just sneaks in. :biggrin:


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#68 patrickamory

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 05:37 PM

Kim - I'm going to try those long cooked beans. That sounds excellent. Do you think salt pork would work well for the meat? [Edit: I see you recommended salt pork! Excellent because I have tons in the freezer.]

 

Shane - OMG that dessert looks insanely decadent, and I'm not even a dessert guy.


Edited by patrickamory, 05 March 2013 - 05:38 PM.


#69 Kim Shook

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 07:07 AM

Shane – great looking dessert. 

 

judiu – thanks for the information about the potatoes.  I’ve just put a hold on that cookbook at the library and will look for the recipe when it comes.  I know those onions that you are talking about and we love them.  For some reason lots of rib restaurants have them.  They are not quite as brittle as these are, but I’m wondering if you could just cut them a bit thicker and prepare the same way and get an ‘onion cloud’?  You’ve given me an idea! 

 

Patrick – I hope you enjoy the beans!

 

Last night I made another new dish requested by Mr. Kim .  He saw Roger Mooking on TV make a spicy shrimp and banana dish that looked interesting.  It included shrimp, bananas, shallots, soy sauce, sambal, honey and lime juice.  Sauce made with shrimp on top:

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Plated with peas, stir-fried noodles and asparagus:

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I suspected that this dish would not be something that I would like, so I made my own shrimp stir-fry with soy sauce, garlic, shallots and sugar:

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I was right – much too spicy for me and I really didn’t care for the flavor of shrimp and bananas.  Mr. Kim, however, loved it.



#70 rotuts

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 12:30 PM

SobaAddict70

 

would you detail how you did those roasted veg?  they looked really nice next to that Ck.



#71 SobaAddict70

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 03:48 PM

SobaAddict70
 
would you detail how you did those roasted veg?  they looked really nice next to that Ck.

 
thanks, LOL.

you'll notice they were all cut the same shape and size, more or less. then seasoned with sea salt, black pepper and thyme, and tossed in a little olive oil. I should probably have used fresh olive oil, but instead used the leftover oil from frying the oysters. then roasted for 35 minutes at 350 F.

I don't do much when it comes to roasted vegetables.

a commenter on Facebook mentioned that the sprouts would be done before the turnips/rutabaga. well, they turned out okay.  :raz:



#72 SobaAddict70

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 04:10 PM

kim, thanks.  :)
 
I think beet vinegar has its uses, but I have to experiment more.  Unfortunately, that means I'd be eating beets for a week, and I'm not terribly interested in doing that.  The container that's in the fridge has about half a cup of vinegar that will keep indefinitely.  At some point, I'll remove it from the fridge, bottle it and put it in my pantry.  By the time November rolls around, I expect that sucker'll be used up.
 
I never quite got the taste of beet sweetness to come through though.  Maybe I need to dramatically increase the proportion of beet peels to the red wine vinegar next time.  The color though, is fantastic.  It's a deep magenta-purple that doesn't become easily diluted, even with the introduction of water. 
 
As for the taste, it's vinegary and a little bit earthy.  I wouldn't use it by itself, but combined with something else, like a citrus reduction, or honey, or a syrup.  As you can see, I eat salads just about every dinner, so I'll be putting it to good use.
 
"Quick" dinner last night:
 
celery.jpg
Rotini pasta, with celery braised in tomato sauce

That's about four stalks celery, chopped up, leaves included; briefly simmered in lightly salted water for 10 minutes, then cooked in olive oil with garlic and anchovy, and a couple of ladlefuls of leftover shaksuka tomato sauce from earlier in the week.



#73 C. sapidus

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 05:22 PM

Kim – Looks like it was shrimp night all around.

 

Soba – I’m glad you didn’t run out of lentils, and your oysters had my mouth watering.

 

Chipotle shrimp (camarones enchipotlados) – sauce of chipotles in adobo, tomatoes, garlic, and the ancho chile paste from earlier in the week (ancho, guajillo, and chipotle chiles, roasted garlic, cumin, cloves, Mexican oregano, black pepper, and chicken broth). These are the flavors that I crave – deep, complex, aromatic, and sneaky-hot.

 

Red chile rice (arroz rojo) – with white onion, chicken broth, and more of the ancho chile paste.

 

Jazzed-up refried beans from a can, our usual salad, and Mrs. C made guacamole.

 

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#74 patrickamory

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 06:52 PM

Chipotle shrimp looks excellent Bruce.



#75 judiu

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 07:07 PM

Kim, I too love the onion loaf that Bobby Rubino's serves, but these onions are prepared just like yours, but cut into "strings" , rather than rings, just floured and deepfried, not battered like an onion loaf would be. They come out dry, almost greaseless, crisp and airy, hence the "cloud".
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#76 SobaAddict70

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 11:52 PM

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"Eggs and oysters" -- fried oysters, poached farm egg, Swedish lumpfish caviar, sautéed watercress


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Sautéed watercress, wasabi furikake


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Spaghettini with scallops in garlic and parsley sauce

From "Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking (2012 edition, pages 185-186)



#77 huiray

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 06:41 AM

Very late "dinner" last night/early a.m. -- Chicken & shrimp wontons [Prime Food], blanched "Yu Choy Sum", skinny wonton noodles, chicken stock simmered a short while with some whole dried anchovies then poured off from the fish.

 

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#78 rotuts

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 07:32 AM

SobaAddict70

 

your Ck w/ veg intrigued me as a few weeks ago America's Test Kitchen or Cook's Country did a Ck w/Veg where they cut up the Ck and placed the pieces on the seasoned Veg and pan roasted it.

 

they used B.Sprouts which is unusual and looked a lot like your version, 'cut up'

 

its on my list!

 

had to also know your times for the veg!

 

Yum Yum!



#79 patrickamory

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 05:10 PM

Cannellinis are back in stock at Rancho Gordo. Served with sauted kale, crumbled goat cheese and olive oil.

 

beans_kale.jpg



#80 liuzhou

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 06:10 AM

Not the prettiest plating I know, but was just me at home, very hungry after a very long trip. Greed outvoted art.

 

Chicken poached with garlic and ginger; chillies stuffed with pork, wood ear fungus and scallion; Zhuang preserved lemon; rice.

 

 

IMG_3773.jpg


Edited by liuzhou, 08 March 2013 - 06:11 AM.


#81 Unpopular Poet

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 08:49 AM

Patrick -- those cannellinis look marvelous and remind me that I need toget back to work on my vegetarian version of beans and escarole!  Now...what do I replace the sausage with....


Edited by Unpopular Poet, 08 March 2013 - 08:50 AM.


#82 patrickamory

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 08:53 AM

Unpopular Poet - the beans were so good they needed no meat. I just sauted garlic and sage in olive oil, added the beans and water, and cooked them low and slow adding salt and fresh oregano halfway through.

 

In fact I was planning to puree the leftovers and serve them on crostinis last night, only to discover I'd eaten the rest while thinking about it!



#83 Paul Bacino

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 11:31 AM

Anson Mills Stone Ground Polenta, Egg  2Hrs@61 C and Blk Truffles

 

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#84 Prawncrackers

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 04:17 PM

Even though we're due more snow next week here in the UK, BBQ season has started!  Here are some baby backs and spares to see in the spring:

 

20130216k.JPG

20130226g.JPG

 

 

More porky goodness.  I very rarely cook for one so I was very much looking forward to a nice big juicy pork chop for myself.  Simply pan fried and I threw some tong ho choi for a more balanced meal.  Sesame miso dipping sauce on the side and a bowl of plain Japanese rice.  My idea of comfort food.

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Sick of pork yet?  Another meal for one, albeit badly misjudged, I was so stuffed after this one.  Pork tenderloin and kidney stirfried with kimchi, tong ho again (far too much) and a salted duck egg:

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and as a break from pork, Moroccan lamb tostadas!

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#85 Antwaan Randle Kay

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 05:11 PM

Barbue from Brittany

 

ZGaMZWR.jpg

 

Roasted on the bone with cauliflower and sauce diable

8C4WPXN.jpg



#86 Prawncrackers

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 06:03 PM

Ooh is that a Brill? Lovely fish, I had some tonight filleted, crumbed and deep fried.

#87 ScottyBoy

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 06:05 PM

Prawncrackers - 

 

:wub:  :blink:  :shock: PORK!


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#88 patrickamory

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 06:07 PM

Paul that is beyond stunning, both the food and the photography. I love Anson Mills grits, have never tried their polenta.



#89 patrickamory

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 06:08 PM

And Prawncrackers not to ignore your fabulous looking ribs. I have an (I'm sure entirely outdated) notion that the British don't do real barbecue - you give the lie to that.



#90 SobaAddict70

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 06:15 PM

unpopular poet -- this pic might give you an idea, along the lines of what patrick mentions.
 
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Broccoli rabe and heirloom beans with sourdough-garlic croutons and cheese
 
you can view the recipe here (note that I tend towards the lacto-ovo end of the vegetarian spectrum, so eggs and dairy figure quite prominently in my diet.  the reason why I mention that is because, if you omit the butter and cheese from the recipe, it won't impact things all that much.):  http://kitchenseason...lowly-simmered/