Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Sarson da saay


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Naftal

Naftal
  • participating member
  • 379 posts
  • Location:SE Michigan

Posted 22 July 2012 - 03:30 PM

I just learned that a common weed in my neighborhood (Chenopodium Album) is the main ingredient of this dish. Can anyone give me a recipe for Sarson da saay? I used the latin name because this plant has many common names.I do know that this plant is sometimes refered to as mustard greens and there is a curry dish that cooks this item with onions and potatos. I do not know if this is is the same dish.If they are different, I'd like to know both recipes.This plant is known as Bathua or Bathuwa in India. Thanks!

Edited by Naftal, 22 July 2012 - 04:23 PM.

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)


#2 anzu

anzu
  • participating member
  • 455 posts
  • Location:Berlin, Germany

Posted 30 July 2012 - 01:40 AM

Bathua is not the same as mustard greens. Mustard greens are called sarson in Hindi and Punjabi, hence the name of the dish sarson da saag (saag -not saay - being pretty much any greens).

However, bathua grows as a weed throughout northern India and is indeed sold and cooked as a vegetable. Since it is often found growing along with mustard greens, traditionally the two types of greens could often be cooked together. If you see a sarson da saag recipe calling for mustard greens and spinach, substitute bathua for the spinach.

#3 Naftal

Naftal
  • participating member
  • 379 posts
  • Location:SE Michigan

Posted 21 August 2012 - 11:25 AM

Bathua is not the same as mustard greens. Mustard greens are called sarson in Hindi and Punjabi, hence the name of the dish sarson da saag (saag -not saay - being pretty much any greens).

However, bathua grows as a weed throughout northern India and is indeed sold and cooked as a vegetable. Since it is often found growing along with mustard greens, traditionally the two types of greens could often be cooked together. If you see a sarson da saag recipe calling for mustard greens and spinach, substitute bathua for the spinach.

Thank you so much for this information. It clarified things. Now if only I could find a recipe.

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)


#4 ericparkr

ericparkr
  • participating member
  • 45 posts
  • Location:Gold Coast, Australia

Posted 12 June 2013 - 04:56 AM

It's sarson da saag not saay. It's the most delicious and tatsy food of the North India. Specially it's the traditional dish of Punjab. It is served with butter and maize chappati (makki ki roti). It is cooked by chooping the mustard green and then boil in pressure cooker for some time and then you can use maize flour for making thick it and then after cooked by using onions that must be in large quntaity as compared to other dishes and other ingredients like jeera, daniya, chilly powder (indian names) etc. according to your taste.


Edited by ericparkr, 12 June 2013 - 05:02 AM.


#5 SylviaLovegren

SylviaLovegren
  • participating member
  • 1,059 posts
  • Location:Toronto, ON

Posted 12 June 2013 - 05:32 AM

I've never had sarson da saag but here's a recipe (which includes the chenopodium): http://www.vegrecipe...sarson-ka-saag/

The weed is known in North America as lamb's quarters and is good fresh and raw in salads, or cooked like spinach.

#6 djyee100

djyee100
  • society donor
  • 1,543 posts
  • Location:San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 12 June 2013 - 11:16 AM

This is a recipe from Indian chef and cookbook author Ruta Kahate.

SPICY INDIAN GREENS
Adapted recipe from Ruta Kahate
In a large pot, combine 2 lbs pared & chopped up mustard greens; 1/2 lb spinach; 2-inch piece of fresh gingerroot, peeled, then chopped or grated; 2-3 serrano chile peppers, trimmed and sliced; 4 cups water; approx 2 tsp salt. Boil down this mixture until only 1 cup of liquid is left at the bottom of the pot. Puree in a blender. Return mixture to the pot and place over moderate heat. Combine with 2 TB fine corn flour and 1 stick of unsalted butter (4 oz). Taste and adjust for salt. Serve with flatbreads.


I first tasted this dish at a cooking class that Ruta gave on Indian breads. I was overwhelmed by the wonderfulness of this dish, and asked Ruta for the recipe. Then I almost keeled over when she told me how much butter is in it. Ruta told me sternly that if I wanted to replicate the taste, I had to add that much butter. Well, sometimes I do and sometimes I don't. The dish still tastes good with less butter.



#7 patrickamory

patrickamory
  • participating member
  • 1,535 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 21 July 2013 - 03:29 PM

I wonder whether it would be more appropriate to use ghee than butter?

 

If so, what proportion of ghee to the recommended amount of butter?