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Troubleshooting Macarons

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198 replies to this topic

#181 pquinene

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 04:59 AM

Hello every body!!

 

Please have a look at the attached photo to see the difference between my macaron and the one from a cafe. Mine was hollow and unpleasantly crunchy, unlike the one on the right which was very creamy.

Can someone please explain to me how to get the layer "right right under the thin shell" to be creamy like the one in the photo?

This is the recipe I used:

  • 90 grams (3 ounces) of egg whites (equal to whites of 3 large eggs), at room temperature
  • 125 grams (4 ½ ounces) of ground almonds or almond flour
  • 125 grams (4 ½ ounces) of icing sugar
  • 25 grams (1 ounce) unsweetened cocoa powder (optional)
  • 125 grams (4 ½ ounces) of caster sugar (superfine sugar) divided into two equal portions

 

Thanks in advance for any help

 

detkxu.jpg

 

2j466nr.jpg

 

Did you "age/mature" your macs in the fridge? I find that once you fill the macs, they have to go in the fridge to become soft and creamy. In general, ganache-filled macs take a day or two to mature compared to macs filled with a cream cheese mixture or just plain jam. I love how the macs go from soft and chewy to soft and creamy the longer they are in the fridge. Depending on the filling, if they age too long, they become too soft. Hope this helps.



#182 pastrygirl

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 09:32 AM

Quick question on storage - troubleshooting too many macarons!

I had a catering yesterday that ordered 400 macarons, so I started production four days ago. They barely touched them. If I wanted to serve them a week from tomorrow, should I freeze them, or will they be fine in the walk-in? I'll make fresh ones next week if I have to, but it would be nice to not have all that piping and sandwiching go to waste! They are filled with Italian meringue buttercream.

What would you do?

#183 judiu

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 01:49 PM

375 ( %) ) untouched macarons? Send 'em to me!
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#184 pastrygirl

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 04:55 PM

375 ( %) ) untouched macarons? Send 'em to me!


After I set aside enough for the next three parties this weekend, I still had about 70 extra, so I put them in the freezer and will see if they survive well enough to be sold next week. I'm sure I've seen frozen macarons in grocery stores. I'll try to remember to report back on how well they thaw out.

#185 JeanneCake

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 05:23 PM

Depending on the conditions in your walk in (humid or not) the shells might change color (this happened to me in the summer when I moved and got a new walk that needed to be tweaked a bit); I would put them in fish buckets lined with parchment or deli paper and go from there.  Herme ages his macs in the cooler for a day; and I've stored completed ones in the freezer (in fish tubs but I wrap them with plastic wrap) for a week so I think you'll be fine!



#186 DianaM

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 09:27 PM

After I set aside enough for the next three parties this weekend, I still had about 70 extra, so I put them in the freezer and will see if they survive well enough to be sold next week. I'm sure I've seen frozen macarons in grocery stores. I'll try to remember to report back on how well they thaw out.


Pastrygirl, I am very interested in the results of your experiment. I am planning to make macs as favours for my son's baptism, and being able to make and freeze them ahead of time would save me from this last-minute baking frenzy. Especially since they are so temperamental.

Also, if anyone has experience freezing the shells only, and cares to share what they know, I would greatly appreciate it.

#187 JeanneCake

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 05:47 AM

I freeze the unfilled shells all the time; I put them flat sides together in a fish tub (think tupperware or rubbermaid airtight container) and line them up and then freeze them.  I fill them immediately after taking them from the freezer and then store the filled ones in the cooler (same way, in the fish tub, airtight) for a day.  I tell the customer the shelf life is 3 days max. 



#188 DianaM

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 11:47 AM

I freeze the unfilled shells all the time; I put them flat sides together in a fish tub (think tupperware or rubbermaid airtight container) and line them up and then freeze them.  I fill them immediately after taking them from the freezer and then store the filled ones in the cooler (same way, in the fish tub, airtight) for a day.  I tell the customer the shelf life is 3 days max.


Sounds great! Do you think 2 weeks is a reasonable time to keep them frozen?

#189 pastrygirl

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 02:57 PM

After I set aside enough for the next three parties this weekend, I still had about 70 extra, so I put them in the freezer and will see if they survive well enough to be sold next week. I'm sure I've seen frozen macarons in grocery stores. I'll try to remember to report back on how well they thaw out.


Pastrygirl, I am very interested in the results of your experiment. I am planning to make macs as favours for my son's baptism, and being able to make and freeze them ahead of time would save me from this last-minute baking frenzy. Especially since they are so temperamental.

Also, if anyone has experience freezing the shells only, and cares to share what they know, I would greatly appreciate it.


Diana, Jeanne is right, they freeze fine. The ones I froze had already been in the fridge for a few days and were a bit soft, but I don't think they were changed or harmed at all after a week in the freezer. I still have one more tray frozen. I'm sure 2 weeks would be fine.

#190 Alleguede

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 04:53 PM

If the Macarons are well wrapped up, you can keep them for a little while frozen. Pierre herme and la duree ship them abroad over the world.

#191 pjm333

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 08:21 AM

Been using this recipe for years with great success, I use frozen egg whites/thawed right out of the fridge.

 

Macaroons           300 Degrees Convection Oven

 

2 # 10X

1 # Blanched Almond Flour

2 Cups egg whites

1 Cup Superfine Sugar

Coloring either dry or wet

                         Sift 10X & Almond Flour, Beat whites till stiff and add sugar & beat till sugar is dissolved & add color. Fold in 10X mixture in 3 stages, pipe out onto silpat & I let sit about 10 minutes and bake for 13 to 15 minutes. 

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  • Chocolate Macaroons !.jpg
  • mac 2.jpg

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#192 pquinene

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 07:05 AM

 

375 ( %) ) untouched macarons? Send 'em to me!


After I set aside enough for the next three parties this weekend, I still had about 70 extra, so I put them in the freezer and will see if they survive well enough to be sold next week. I'm sure I've seen frozen macarons in grocery stores. I'll try to remember to report back on how well they thaw out.

 

I have frozen both filled and unfilled macs for as long as 5 to 6 weeks. How fast they soften depends on the filling. I use primarily cream cheese and butter flavored with jam, just jam or a soft chocolate ganache.  I don't use buttercream because it is too sweet and can take several days to soften the shells. I have found that filled and frozen macs thawed out in the fridge mature more quickly than macs that are filled then placed immediately in the fridge. I freeze mine in freezer storage bags and plastic food storage containers. I would freeze at least 6 to 12 pieces of every batch you make and takes notes of filled, unfilled, the type of filling, how long your freeze them......then you have a more confident idea of how long they keep well for future event planning.



#193 bripastryguy

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 02:56 PM

i've been making macarons for the past few months and have no issues. We make the shells (common meringue, not Italian), no issue. Bake great, feet and all. We store the shells in the walkin freezer overnite. Next day, take them out and fill. Then they get stored in a chest freezer in airtight box until needed. my store staff loads the trays the night before. Then for the past two weeks weve come in and they are actually wet, almost soggy. I have not changed my recipe or any of the ingredients. They are being stored in a Leader bakery case on the top shelf. There is nothing that can be leaking on them. I have even put perforated containers of desicant and still not helping. I have had the refrigeration unit checked and its working perfect. Please help, these are a big seller for me. i would hate to stop making them cause of this, but I cant afford to keep throwing them away. Plese send replies to: bripastryguy@gmail.com

 

Thank you


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#194 Kerry Beal

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 04:09 PM

Brian - any change in the way you are removing them from the freezer?  Thereby encouraging condensation on the surface.



#195 Alleguede

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 07:31 PM

Hi, what filling do you put in them? That could be the origin of the issue. Because even if you under baked your shells they shouldn't get soggy. I suspect your filling to absorb a lot of humidity and release as well.

#196 Drafty82

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 09:42 PM

I have been baking Macarons at home pretty successfully for 6 months or so, and have recently upgraded to larger aluminium baking sheets & silpat (from traditional Steel trays & baking paper) after a class with Adriano Zumbo (I am in Australia). My 1st batch turned out perfect (chocolate shells - replaced 10% of almonds & icing sugar with cocoa powder as per his recipe)., however 90% of the next 2 standard batches turned out as pictured below. Does anyone have any ideas? I just tried another batch this morning, the 1st two trays came out perfect, and the 3rd did this again.

 

I have made the following changes since my class;

 

- 2mm thick aluminium sheet with Silpat

- grinding my own blanched almonds (in lieu of Almond Meal)

 

With the 2 completely failed trays, I developed a theory, that I had rapped the trays a little over zealously, I did take care this morning with just some gentle tapping, maybe by the third tray I wasn’t so gentle...

 

Has anyone had a similar experience? Or any ideas, I just find my theory lacking substance

 

DSC_0362_zpsc7488a49.jpg



#197 Volition

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 05:47 AM

Is the bottom still on the Silpat? If so, I found this happens because of either or both of two things. Not baked long enough and/or and what I suspect to be the main problem. Not left to cool long enough before taking off the tray. This should help.

#198 Drafty82

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 02:08 PM

No, I know what you are saying, but the base isn't left on the Silpat. There is a fine powdery residue where the base used to be, like the base was massively over cooked to the point it disintegrated.

 

I think I might do a pure test batch next time, and reduce the oven temp further, as the outer shell is pretty crisp.



#199 pquinene

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 02:57 PM

I have been baking Macarons at home pretty successfully for 6 months or so, and have recently upgraded to larger aluminium baking sheets & silpat (from traditional Steel trays & baking paper) after a class with Adriano Zumbo (I am in Australia). My 1st batch turned out perfect (chocolate shells - replaced 10% of almonds & icing sugar with cocoa powder as per his recipe)., however 90% of the next 2 standard batches turned out as pictured below. Does anyone have any ideas? I just tried another batch this morning, the 1st two trays came out perfect, and the 3rd did this again.

 

I have made the following changes since my class;

 

- 2mm thick aluminium sheet with Silpat

- grinding my own blanched almonds (in lieu of Almond Meal)

 

With the 2 completely failed trays, I developed a theory, that I had rapped the trays a little over zealously, I did take care this morning with just some gentle tapping, maybe by the third tray I wasn’t so gentle...

 

Has anyone had a similar experience? Or any ideas, I just find my theory lacking substance

 

DSC_0362_zpsc7488a49.jpg

If all else is the same, then the new pans you used transferred heat either too quickly or too slow.  If you went from parchment paper to silpat, the silpat is thicker and the heat gets to your macs slower -- try using your new pans with parchment paper.  If heat is getting to your macs too fast, nest two exact pans together -- pipe your batter on one pan then put that pan into a second pan...then put both in your oven.

 

Since your first two trays on your last attempt came out perfect and the third did not, then your batter could be sitting out too long.....could you bake them all at once or fit as much batter onto one pan as possible? Somewhere in this thread, another member changed the brand of parchment used....and the macs come out radically misshapen.

 

The only time something like this happened -- with a handful of macs -- was during one of my experiments. I used the freshest eggs I could get at the store and separated the whites the same day I used them. I've learned that if you use an electric oven without a fan/convection feature, then old egg whites that have sat on the counter a couple of days work best.

 

Chocolate shells using cocoa powder tend to be more stable than plain shells because cocoa powder has starch, hence they tend to be less hollow. The only way I make macarons now is with aged egg whites AND tapioca starch -- via French/basic meringue! I never get hollows and they all come out perfect. I use  5 oz. fine almond flour, 8 oz. powdered sugar, 4 oz. aged whites, 1.5 oz. caster sugar, 0.5 oz. tapioca starch, and 1/4 tsp. cream of tartar.. I whip the meringue on about medium-low for 6 minutes, medium for 9 minutes...then if needed, high for 30 to 60 seconds.

 

mint_chocolate_macarons.jpg

 

coconut_strawberry_n_cream_french_macaro

 

 

Hope this helps!


Edited by pquinene, 15 April 2014 - 03:16 PM.

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