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Are the Spanish eating their vegetables?

Spanish

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35 replies to this topic

#31 weinoo

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 12:13 PM

This perceived absence of vegetable is a big mystery to me.

But that's what I'm saying...it wasn't perceived. We were in Barcelona for a week, and then in Paris. The difference in how often vegetables were served in Paris (in the restaurants where we ate) vs. how often they were served in Barca (in the restaurants where we ate) was striking.
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#32 Kouign Aman

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 02:17 PM

Huh.
I was in Spain ~ 9 years back, and the ensalada mixta was ubiquitous & invariate.

i like the stewed vegetables - the peas cooked w ham til they melt, etc.
And then there's always gazpacho - salad in semi-liquid form.
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#33 Kouign Aman

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 02:19 PM



This perceived absence of vegetable is a big mystery to me.

But that's what I'm saying...it wasn't perceived. We were in Barcelona for a week, and then in Paris. The difference in how often vegetables were served in Paris (in the restaurants where we ate) vs. how often they were served in Barca (in the restaurants where we ate) was striking.

If there werent differences, why go to both? The variations and differences are what make travel appealing.
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#34 weinoo

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 04:29 PM

Huh.
I was in Spain ~ 9 years back, and the ensalada mixta was ubiquitous & invariate.

i like the stewed vegetables - the peas cooked w ham til they melt, etc.
And then there's always gazpacho - salad in semi-liquid form.

Let me rephrase. The dozen or so restaurant meals we ate while in Barcelona had very little in the way of vegetable accompaniments compared to the dozen or so restaurant meals we ate while in Paris.

If there werent differences, why go to both? The variations and differences are what make travel appealing.

Of course. Who ever said any different?
Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
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Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

#35 pedro

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 05:33 PM

Were asadores the dozen or so restaurants you ate in Barcelona? ;-)
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#36 Parigi

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Posted 13 January 2011 - 06:53 AM

"View PostParigi, on 12 January 2011 - 07:32 PM, said:
This perceived absence of vegetable is a big mystery to me.

But that's what I'm saying...it wasn't perceived."

But cher Weinoo, everything is perceived. :cool:
I do not say this with any irritation or negative feeling. I am mystified and amused. It's as though we had gone to two Barcelonas in two universes.
But I was not hallucinating when the faaaab asparagus - a daily specialty in season - at El Quim in the Boqueria market screamed: bite me, bite me, bite me. I had to, just had to. (OK maybe I was hullucinating slightly...)
Ditto the shishitos that Pep forced down my throat at Cal Pep...
I wish there were a drooling emoticon.
The only cultural confusion that I can think of is that in many cities in north America, a salad is an obligatory sidedish. In Spain it is not obligatory. You have to order it separately.

Edited by Parigi, 13 January 2011 - 07:03 AM.






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