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The Fruitcake Topic

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#211 oli

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 07:33 AM

You'll get the same size pieces in your cake, and they have a bit of a tendency to clump together.  I found the fig pieces were magnets for other pieces of fruit.  So, it depends on what you would like in your finished product.

The recipe calls for 100 grams of chocolate.  My personal taste would be to add more.  The chocolate flavor of the cake, as written, is quite subtle.  I have yet to try adding a chocolate sauce, but intend to.

I'm ageing it and found that I liked the two week old piece better than younger pieces.

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I don't understand, if I chop my pieces up, how will I still get the same size pieces in the cake? Are not traditional fruit cake with pieces of fruit that are the same size pieces as I will get with chopping?
I am going with adding more chocolate, maybe even some Godiva liquor, and we'll see how it all works out come Xmas.

#212 Lindacakes

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 03:37 PM

Sorry -- what I mean is, whatever size you chop them to, that's the size they'll be in the cake. Except that I found a bit of clumping, so my fruit pieces were fruit conglomerates. Only where figs were concerned, though.
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#213 Lindacakes

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 03:38 PM

I used Valrhona 70 %, by the way.
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#214 GTO

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 03:44 PM

In the same vein as fruit cake, I was looking through the ingredients on a Sainsbury's Christmas pudding and I was surprised to see "mustard" listed as one of the spices used. I've never seen that added before, have you?
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#215 The Old Foodie

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 04:15 PM

For those who want a more chocolate-y flavour - as well as adding more chopped chocolate, I'm sure it would work just fine to substitute some of the flour with extra cocoa - say 1/4 cup.

Might try that myself next time around! You can never have a cake that is too chocolate-y.
Happy Feasting

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#216 Lindacakes

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Posted 29 November 2006 - 12:54 PM

Good idea Janet, I will try that next time!

I have a recipe for a ginger cake I like very much that is very spicy -- it calls for powdered mustard, which lends a complex and interesting hot taste.
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#217 The Old Foodie

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Posted 29 November 2006 - 02:06 PM

Good idea Janet, I will try that next time!

I have a recipe for a ginger cake I like very much that is very spicy -- it calls for powdered mustard, which lends a complex and interesting hot taste.

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I'd love that recipe, if you will part with it!
Happy Feasting

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#218 Lindacakes

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Posted 30 November 2006 - 10:50 AM

Sure! I'll email it to your home address in the next day or two, when I get to the home computer.

Let me know how you like it.

For instant gratification, this is a recipe I like particularly -- Gingerbread Tiles --
http://www.estarcion...ves/001633.html

I made slabs of this, rolled over it with a springerle pin and then added a glaze to make a snowy effect. Adored by friends. I want to try them again cutting them into gingerbread men.

There's a new ad campaign for Canada Dry ginger ale in which a gingerbread man is drinking a glass of ginger ale . . . every time I drive by this giant billboard near my house, I get absolutely mad for gingerbread . . .

I don't think that's what Canada Dry had in mind.
I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

#219 Rinsewind

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 02:31 PM

I loathe fruitcake. Actually, I just don't like dried fruit, which is not doubt the problem. However, my husband loves fruitcake and his mom (who is nearly 80) stopped making it a few years ago. He's been pulling a hound dog face at me for the last few Christmas seasons to get me to make one. I completed my first fruitcake last week from a newish version of The The Joy of Cooking. It didn't call for soaking the fruit first, and it uses brandy in the batter rather than bourban, rum, or cognac as previous posters have mentioned.

Have I just made a complete hash of my first fruitcake by following that recipe? :wacko:

-Rinsewind
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#220 Kris

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 02:42 PM

I was late this year, but this past weekend I made 9 black cakes plus 6 mini bundt black cakes!

I dosed them liberally with rum and port wine - hopefully they'll mellow out by the time Christmas rolls around. :)

#221 viva

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 03:03 PM

Of the 25+ desserts that I served on Thanksgiving, the only one that was saved from the post-Thanksgiving purge was MeeMaw's Pork Mincemeat Cake. High praise!

I did serve it this year brushed with a thin sugar & rum glaze.

Also I made Mincemeat Cookies with the leftover mincemeat from the cake, mixed with eggs, more bourbon & rum, and dark Karo, baked in little tart forms on a cream-cheese pie dough. Very popular as well - the pork content was not disclosed. :wink:

Edited by viva, 06 December 2006 - 03:06 PM.

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#222 andiesenji

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 11:49 PM

Viva,
I am so pleased, and I know MeeMaw would be also, with all the mileage you are getting out of her cherished receipt. I prepared a double batch early last month and canned it in pint jars (instead of the usual quarts) because I finally figured that a pint of the stuff is quite enough for smaller cakes, steamed puddings, bread dressing as a side dish, etc. I used it to stuff a rolled pork loin roast that I served with Cumberland sauce and everyone raved about it.
How about posting the recipe for your cream cheese pastry dough.
My neighbor, Leila Obregon, asked for a jar and she is going to use it in empanadas. Her dad asked if I had ever tried using it in a mix for sausages - which gave me an idea to try - I just have to order some of the narrow casing to stuff finger-sized ones. I have some duck meat and some venison in the freezer that should make up into very tasty sausages.
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#223 Lindacakes

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Posted 08 December 2006 - 09:36 AM

Rinsewind, there are several approaches to fruitcake and the Joy of Cooking approach doesn't sound bad at all. Have you tried it yet? Happy with the result?

One of the tricks is getting a good base cake recipe and then playing with it. Only use the fruits you like.

Martha Stewart's web site has a very intriguing recipe called Dowager Dutchess Cake I've always wanted to try -- I imagine it would have high appeal to the "I loathe fruitcake" crowd.

It's nice to see everyone swapping ideas -- love this time of year because I love the stuff baked now . . .
I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

#224 lperry

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Posted 08 December 2006 - 11:02 AM

I baked my fruitcake yesterday using Alton Brown's "Free Range Fruitcake" recipe from Food TV. I really like this one because there is just enough batter to hold together the fruit. I calculated the volume of fruit and use what I like (as suggested above). Plus, my fruit macerated for about six weeks this year. It got rum bath #1 last night, and I'll continue to feed it for a week or two. Hopefully it will be mellow enough by Christmas.

-L

#225 Luckylies

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Posted 09 December 2006 - 09:06 AM

EMERGENCY!!!!!!!!!!!!!
HOW DO I WRAP THIS THING!!!!!!!!!!
I have some black cakes and some round tins...should I wrap the cakes in muslin and then....something? and then place them in the tin?? I'm just not sure how the inside of the tin arangement should work out.
Also, do these things get frosted or anything? Should I make a hard sauce to give with it?

Help please...today is one of my last days to get these things finished!



I then thought I'd tie the tins with bows...

I also have some rectangular ones that don't fit into tins any suggestions for those would be great too..
does this come in pork?

My name's Emma Feigenbaum.

#226 lperry

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Posted 09 December 2006 - 11:04 AM

I've never used muslin, but cheesecloth works great. Because the tin seals, I don't think you need to worry about a moisture barrier to keep the cake from drying out, although you may want to line the tin with parchment so the metallic taste doesn't leach into your cake (voice of unhappy experience).

-L

#227 Lindacakes

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Posted 09 December 2006 - 05:56 PM

I would line the tin with plastic wrap.

Don't know about the hard sauce -- when I give mine away I suggest something creamy. I've used mascarpone. Whipped cream would be good. Friends I've given them to have used ice cream. Creme fraiche would work.
I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

#228 Sentiamo

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Posted 09 December 2006 - 06:10 PM

Anyone wanting to make a lovely, moist fruit cake without eggs here is my Grandma's old recipe. This is an old fashioned boiled cake and I never ice it. Easy to make and great to have in your cake tin!

1 Can Sweetened Condensed Milk
1 Can Cold Water ( CM can full)
1 lb 2 oz Mixed Fruit ( I use currants, raisins and sultanas but other fruits can be used)
8 oz Butter
10 oz Flour
1 Tsp Baking Soda

Boil first 4 ingredients for 3 minutes. Cool. Add sifted flour and soda. Mix gently but well.

Spoon into a prepared tin the size of a lunch plate ( Grandma's words!) and bake at 160 deg for 1 1/2 hours.

If top browning too quickly, cover with a sheet of foil.

Pulling from sides or toothpick test to determine doneness.

Lyn

#229 oli

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Posted 10 December 2006 - 02:55 PM

How do you know when your fruit cake is done? Is it the same way as any cake - when the tooth pick comes out clean?

Edited by oli, 10 December 2006 - 02:56 PM.


#230 oli

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Posted 10 December 2006 - 02:58 PM

For those who want a more chocolate-y flavour - as well as adding more chopped chocolate, I'm sure it would work just fine to substitute some of the flour with extra cocoa - say 1/4 cup.

Might try that myself next time around! You can never have a cake that is too chocolate-y.

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The recipe you gave calls for 120°C which is 250°F, is that the correct temp?
Thanks

#231 The Old Foodie

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Posted 10 December 2006 - 04:28 PM

For those who want a more chocolate-y flavour - as well as adding more chopped chocolate, I'm sure it would work just fine to substitute some of the flour with extra cocoa - say 1/4 cup.

Might try that myself next time around! You can never have a cake that is too chocolate-y.

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The recipe you gave calls for 120°C which is 250°F, is that the correct temp?
Thanks

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That's the correct temp in my oven, which runs pretty "hot". Really, there is so much variation between domestic ovens that you have to make a judgement call about your own. Fruit cakes are much more forgiving than lighter cakes, so err on the side of a lower temp as you dont want the outside to cook too quickly.

I am sure some of the professionals can give you a more scientific guide!
Happy Feasting

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My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

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#232 oli

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Posted 10 December 2006 - 05:54 PM

For those who want a more chocolate-y flavour - as well as adding more chopped chocolate, I'm sure it would work just fine to substitute some of the flour with extra cocoa - say 1/4 cup.

Might try that myself next time around! You can never have a cake that is too chocolate-y.

View Post

The recipe you gave calls for 120°C which is 250°F, is that the correct temp?
Thanks

View Post



That's the correct temp in my oven, which runs pretty "hot". Really, there is so much variation between domestic ovens that you have to make a judgement call about your own. Fruit cakes are much more forgiving than lighter cakes, so err on the side of a lower temp as you dont want the outside to cook too quickly.

I am sure some of the professionals can give you a more scientific guide!

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Thanks for that info. I did bake it for an 1.5 hrs and figured it should be done because the recipe said to bake for 1 hour. So I upped the temp. and baked it another 0.5 before taking it out of the oven. The wife of course said "you didn't
read the rest of the sentence", and sure enough I realized my error. Nevertheless
as you said its pretty forgiving and that it is. It came out just fine, the outside was
not overly done and the innards were equal to the outside.
Thanks

#233 Lindacakes

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 12:13 PM

Fruitcake high: last night after I finished trimming the tree, I cut open my black cake and served it with whipped cream lightly sweetened with confectioner's sugar.

Fruitcake low: two gorgeous chocolate alchohol cakes I'd make for aunts and mailed never acheived their destinations.

:angry:
I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

#234 Lindacakes

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 11:19 AM

Fruitcake high: I found my fruitcakes!
I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

#235 The Old Foodie

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 11:58 AM

Fruitcake high:  I found my fruitcakes!

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Thank Goodness! I've been really upset about them! I had visions of your aunts being cake-less at Christmas, and some evil thieves enjoying their ill-gotten gains.

What happened or Where were they?

Janet
Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

#236 Lindacakes

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 11:15 AM

Sent to a relative in West Virginia, who opened the package and sent the two cakes to two different addresses now that the aunts have parted after Thanksgiving.

Don't know what happened, but I've found the mail to be really slow this holiday.

Thanks for caring! It was heartbreaking after all that work and pride, and I decorated the tops so cunningly! We'll see how they hold up to ageing. I'm thinking a nice hot chocolate sauce will moisten them up well if necessary . . .
I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

#237 The Old Foodie

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 12:29 PM

Sent to a relative in West Virginia, who opened the package and sent the two cakes to two different addresses now that the aunts have parted after Thanksgiving.

Don't know what happened, but I've found the mail to be really slow this holiday.

Thanks for caring!  It was heartbreaking after all that work and pride, and I decorated the tops so cunningly!  We'll see how they hold up to ageing.  I'm thinking a nice hot chocolate sauce will moisten them up well if necessary . . .

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I'm sure they'll age fine. I remember many years ago when I was younger and poorer I found in the back of the pantry some fruit cake well past its prime and very dry. I crumbled it up, 'wet' it with something (I'd use something spirity now, but it was probably just water then) and packed it into a pudding basin and steamed it and - Voila! - Steamed Christmas pudding. It was really good.
Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

#238 Luckylies

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 05:04 PM

Sent to a relative in West Virginia, who opened the package and sent the two cakes to two different addresses now that the aunts have parted after Thanksgiving.

Don't know what happened, but I've found the mail to be really slow this holiday.

Thanks for caring!  It was heartbreaking after all that work and pride, and I decorated the tops so cunningly!  We'll see how they hold up to ageing.  I'm thinking a nice hot chocolate sauce will moisten them up well if necessary . . .

View Post



please advise on the decorating technique. :smile:
does this come in pork?

My name's Emma Feigenbaum.

#239 Lindacakes

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 08:55 AM

Oh, it was nothing too special -- just some cut dried fruit and nuts placed around the top just before baking. I hadn't done this before, but I was in Sicily in the spring and fell in love with cassata and got very interested in the decorating style.

So, when faced with my own fruitcakes this year (just these), I put some cut fruit and nut designs on the top. They don't get covered with cake, they don't burn, they get sort of shiny from the heat.

You can work to your heart's content, move the stuff around. Doesnt' affect the cake at all. If you can get citron in large pieces (halves or whole) and you want to work with it, it makes a really beautiful addition. Nice color (light lime green) and nice long strips to play with.
I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

#240 teagal

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 01:20 PM

Many thanks for all the recipes and ideas on this thread. I ended up soaking fruit in amaretto and rum for three weeks, then made a golden fruitcake with some of it & basted it 3 times every few days; made the chocolate alcohol fruitcake with more of my fruit--(fantastic taste), am letting this sit also after basting it just a couple of times; and lastly I chopped pretty fine the rest of my fruit and made a Carribbean fruitcake(this is heavenly-I'm thinking due to the fruit being chopped, a bite thus gives a taste of all the wonderous fruits). I baked the cakes in small pans so one of each I can nibble on every few days to sample--waiting for Christmas to serve them and am seeing how the cake changes as time goes by. Great info on this topic -learned a lot. Thanks!
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