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Salad with roasted beets, watermelon radishes, tomatoes, feta and green goddess dressing

 

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Stuffed delicata squash, crispy purple potatoes, and ribeye with garlic scape butter for my nephew and husband.  Sister and I just had the squash and potatoes.

 

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Ready to be steamed, separately. One of my favourite flatfish, now costs twice as much as turbot. Used to be the other way around. Most turbot are farmed and available year round, whereas brill are (still) wild-caught.  

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Muscat squash 2 ways. This one is eaten with bread.

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Wheat and muscat squash puree cooked risotto style. The Gorgonzola melts and flavours the "risotto". Not much is needed to put together a satisfying meal.

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Edited by BonVivant (log)
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Roast Chicken ...spatchcocked and dry brined 2 days. This time with a fresh salsa verde (1 serrano pepper, 1 shallot, a small bunch of fresh cilantro leaves and stems, a spoonful of basil puree, olive oil and some white wine vinegar) and roasted brussels.

Rose Champagne

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1 hour ago, scamhi said:

Roast Chicken ...spatchcocked and dry brined 2 days. This time with a fresh salsa verde (1 serrano pepper, 1 shallot, a small bunch of fresh cilantro leaves and stems, a spoonful of basil puree, olive oil and some white wine vinegar) and roasted brussels.

Rose Champagne

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Did you have that for Champagne Day?

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I have brought shame to Cajun culture by making shrimp stew that is too thin. I’ll thicken it when I reheat. Maybe. (Flavor is on point, though.)
 

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Dear Food: I hate myself for loving you.

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i didn't get a chance to post first thanksgiving:

 

it's tempting to have second thanksgiving with at least one other couple, but i'm not sure we'll end up doing it.

 

edit: incidentally, as always, spatchcocked that bad boy. cooked in less than an hour. heritage bird from local place.

 

 

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Edited by jimb0 (log)
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20 minutes ago, jimb0 said:

i didn't get a chance to post first thanksgiving:

 

it's tempting to have second thanksgiving with at least one other couple, but i'm not sure we'll end up doing it.

 

edit: incidentally, as always, spatchcocked that bad boy. cooked in less than an hour. heritage bird from local place.

 

 

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Gorgeous skin. What did you rub it with?

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10 hours ago, patti said:

I have brought shame to Cajun culture by making shrimp stew that is too thin. I’ll thicken it when I reheat. Maybe. (Flavor is on point, though.)
 

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did you add any filé powder? Those shrimp look perfect.

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10 hours ago, KennethT said:

Gorgeous skin. What did you rub it with?

 

thanks, man. when i roast poultry i always stick my hands under the skin and loosen it so that it's really only attached at the edges, then i shove butter underneath and rub it around. this works best if the bird isn't too just-out-of-the-fridge-cold. i don't remember what was in this, but i was regrettably out of sage so probably just some oregano, salt, maybe garlic. then just brush a little rice bran oil (any oil is fine, this is just my standard cooking oil) on top and roast 'er up.

 

i salted before the oven but peppered after since i figured the pepper might get burnt.

 

 

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On 10/25/2020 at 3:11 PM, weinoo said:

I did get around to it @ambra!

 

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It was a good one, with nice soccarat. Boneless and non-boneless chicken thighs. Wild shrimp. And to make sure it was non-authentic, a bit of chorizo.

And it looks AMAZING. I swear I'll get to the arroz con pollo one of these days anyway. 😁

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@patti, it may have been thin, but it looks fabulous. Got a recipe you care to share?

@Paul Bacino, is that chili made with neckbones? Puts me in the notion for posole. I have some RG hominy and a big damn Boston Butt I could break down, use part for posole and part for carne adovada.....and probably have enough left for carnitas.

 

Which brings up a point of interest. I don't want all those in one week. Is it feasible to thaw that bad boy (he's 8 pounds or so) out in the fridge, portion him up, bag up  two portions (I could vac seal) and re-freeze them? Seems to me that long as I work quickly and pay attention to keeping everything clean, I should be OK. What say y'all?

 

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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15 minutes ago, kayb said:

Which brings up a point of interest. I don't want all those in one week. Is it feasible to thaw that bad boy (he's 8 pounds or so) out in the fridge, portion him up, bag up  two portions (I could vac seal) and re-freeze them? Seems to me that long as I work quickly and pay attention to keeping everything clean, I should be OK. What say y'all?

 

 

Dad the former butcher does it often. He portions before fully thawed and uses meat saw orsone  of his serious knives. No vac sealer. Old school suck air out of bag with straw and double zip bag. Just not on a 90 degree day.  And he still has that old school trichinosis fear that was instilled in apprentice school and exams.

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An easy weeknight dish of Steamed Sole with Spinach and a Buerre Blanc butter sauce. I don't know why I don't buy and cook with sole more often.  We get it fresh from over on the west side of our state, Washington, and it's inexpensive and delicious.  

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4 4 oz. sole fillets

1 tsp. each salt and black pepper

2 tbsp. white wine vinegar

1 tbsp. chopped shallots

4 tbsp. white wine chardonnay or semillon

4 tbsp. clam juice

3 tbsp. heavy cream

6 tbsp. butter

1 lb. fresh spinach, chopped

2 tsp. olive oil

2 tsp. chopped fresh chives for garnish

fresh thyme for garnish

 

Make the butter sauce-

In a small saucepan, add the vinegar, shallots, white wine and clam juice and bring to the boil. Cook until the liquid is almost evaporated, about 4 minutes. Add the cream and stir to combine.

Take the saucepan off the heat and whisk in the butter one tablespoon at a time until blended. Strain the butter sauce and keep it warm over a pan of warm water while you steam the sole and cook the spinach.

 

Steam the sole and cook the spinach-

Lay two of the sole fillets overlapping, then roll up and secure with toothpicks. Season with salt and pepper. Pour water in the bottom of a rice cooker, then add the steamer basket. Place the sole fillets on the basket and steam for 10 minutes until firm.

 

In a skillet over medium heat, add the olive oil then the spinach and cook until wilted, about 4 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Place a bed of spinach on a serving plate, then add one of the sole roll-ups. Spoon some warm butter sauce over the sole, then garnish with chives and thyme.

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11 minutes ago, heidih said:

 

Dad the former butcher does it often. He portions before fully thawed and uses meat saw orsone  of his serious knives. No vac sealer. Old school suck air out of bag with straw and double zip bag. Just not on a 90 degree day.  And he still has that old school trichinosis fear that was instilled in apprentice school and exams.

My Mother did too.  Every time we had pork chops I'd say they were dry and tough, but she warned that she had to cook them "through" so we wouldn't get trichinosis. 

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58 minutes ago, David Ross said:

An easy weeknight dish of Steamed Sole with Spinach and a Buerre Blanc butter sauce. I don't know why I don't buy and cook with sole more often.  We get it fresh from over on the west side of our state, Washington, and it's inexpensive and delicious.  

 

Is that the petrale sole of west coast fame?

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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7 hours ago, scamhi said:

did you add any filé powder? Those shrimp look perfect.

I didn’t. But I’ve now added a cornstarch slurry and it’s just right! And thank you!
 

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Edited by patti (log)
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Dear Food: I hate myself for loving you.

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