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35 minutes ago, liamsaunt said:

forbidden rice bowl with miso-roasted salmon, roasted purple daikon radishes, cucumber and cilantro with a lime-mirin dressing

 

147911201_forbiddenricebowl.thumb.jpg.9287e021703fb9e765103158bef5f4b0.jpg


That looks mighty tasty ... but what makes it “forbidden” ?

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My family rebelled against another night of Pho, as the house allegedly is still perfumed with a faint star anise/fennel scent ... so I made chicken braised with mushrooms and chestnuts (and added star anise, that’ll show them). Not much to look at, but very, very tasty. Served with stir-fried sugar snap peas & garlic and some dumplings (commercial product) with sesame/black vinegar/soy dip ...


D1166C68-E625-4808-830B-5C4B8FFE6FCF.thumb.jpeg.906a8201b56398db07e03dcc3e82ba52.jpeg
 

29B54400-4149-40CC-AEFA-EA5E55BCB12A.thumb.jpeg.85489127662a71b52a52c3605c2da348.jpeg

 

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@TdeV  Here is my tried and true recipe for bierocks :)

 

Preheat oven to 375F

 

Filling: *note* Make the filling enough in advance so that it's all the way cool.  Don't want to stuff dough with hot filling.  Sometimes I make the filling the day before and keep in the fridge.

 

Venison burger (or hamburger...make sure it's well drained after cooked) about a pound

1 large chopped onion

Bag of coleslaw mix (or make your own or use just plain cut up cabbage--bag of slaw is a good time saver)

About half a cup or so of sour kraut

Salt and pepper

Caraway (I love the taste, but hating biting into the seeds, so I use ground)

Shredded cheddar cheese

 

In a large skillet, heat a bit of veg. oil and throw the onions in.  Cook for a bit, then add your meat and seasonings.  Cook until meat is done (drain if needed).  Stir in the coleslaw mix (you might not want the whole bag--eyeball it--the meat should outweigh the cabbage by a bit.  Let cool.

 

Dough:

1/2 c. milk

1/2 c. water

6 T. butter

1/4 c. sugar

3 1/2 to 3 3/4 c. flour

1 T. yeast

1/2 t. salt

1 egg, beaten

 

Grease large bowl.

Combine milk, water, butter and sugar.  Heat on stove until temp is 110F.

In mixer combine 3 1/2 c. flour, yeast and salt.  Slowly add milk mixture and the beaten egg.  Mix for about 3 mins.  Increase speed to medium and mix until dough is smooth.  If dough looks wet add more flour 1 T. at a time until dough clears the sides of bowl, but sticks to the bottom.  Transfer dough to bowl and let rise until double.

 

When dough is ready, roll out into a square.  Cut into smaller squares (I usually get 4, but you could get more if you make the smaller).  Spoon filling into the center of each square and top with shredded cheddar.  Pull opposite ends of each square together and pinch to seal seams.  Turn over onto parchment covered pan.  Bake in oven for 22-25 mins.

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Shelby said:

@TdeV  Here is my tried and true recipe for bierocks :)

 

Preheat oven to 375F

 

Filling: *note* Make the filling enough in advance so that it's all the way cool.  Don't want to stuff dough with hot filling.  Sometimes I make the filling the day before and keep in the fridge.

 

Venison burger (or hamburger...make sure it's well drained after cooked) about a pound

1 large chopped onion

Bag of coleslaw mix (or make your own or use just plain cut up cabbage--bag of slaw is a good time saver)

About half a cup or so of sour kraut

Salt and pepper

Caraway (I love the taste, but hating biting into the seeds, so I use ground)

Shredded cheddar cheese

 

In a large skillet, heat a bit of veg. oil and throw the onions in.  Cook for a bit, then add your meat and seasonings.  Cook until meat is done (drain if needed).  Stir in the coleslaw mix (you might not want the whole bag--eyeball it--the meat should outweigh the cabbage by a bit.  Let cool.

 

Dough:

1/2 c. milk

1/2 c. water

6 T. butter

1/4 c. sugar

3 1/2 to 3 3/4 c. flour

1 T. yeast

1/2 t. salt

1 egg, beaten

 

Grease large bowl.

Combine milk, water, butter and sugar.  Heat on stove until temp is 110F.

In mixer combine 3 1/2 c. flour, yeast and salt.  Slowly add milk mixture and the beaten egg.  Mix for about 3 mins.  Increase speed to medium and mix until dough is smooth.  If dough looks wet add more flour 1 T. at a time until dough clears the sides of bowl, but sticks to the bottom.  Transfer dough to bowl and let rise until double.

 

When dough is ready, roll out into a square.  Cut into smaller squares (I usually get 4, but you could get more if you make the smaller).  Spoon filling into the center of each square and top with shredded cheddar.  Pull opposite ends of each square together and pinch to seal seams.  Turn over onto parchment covered pan.  Bake in oven for 22-25 mins.

 

 

 

 

Thanks, I'll have to make this. I haven't had one since we moved from Lawrence, KS where we used to go to Runza's. 

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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More Pasta with Chicken, this time it's Penne Rigatoni with Chicken Sausage, Red Pepper, & Shallot in a southwest spices tomato + cream sauce.

 

20201021_175652.thumb.jpg.ef1e1727f46af4cc1aa6141c4dcc89ca.jpg

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Shrimp and Grits with field greens salad (drizzled with toasted sesame dressing), and sauteed Shanghai Bok Choy

 

                                                 1003828944_ShrimpCheesyGrits2440.jpg.a903cc253e3768c868ffd598b81a00e8.jpg

 

 

                                                1796840685_ShrimpGritsplated2441.jpg.a2cde01fc91d2f0405b1405d38ab5369.jpg

 

Dessert was Canadian Cheddar Cheese Apple Crisp - fresh from the oven. Someone couldn't wait!

                                               699777934_CanadianCheddarCheeseAppleCrisp2445.jpg.8c3fa373ccedf246287e10856e993151.jpg

                   

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Really couldn't be bothered today after a tough day at work. Grabbed a frozen pizza (Dr Oetker Ristorante - the best frozen pizza in Australia, I'll die on that hill 😂) for the kid and I. Figured I could just wack mr low carb a steak on and fry an egg or something easy.

 

Well when I got home with said Pizza I was greated with Low-Carb FOMO puppy dog eyes. So ended up making a low carb pizza using this.

 

20201022_191929.thumb.jpg.bda6bff0038bdaa7a513a513ab16ae34.jpg

 

He has decided he would rather just miss pizza next time / wait till I make a cauli crust. 🤦‍♀️ 

 

Pepperoni and Bacon, Baby Bocc & a quick pizza sauce with a tin of whole plum tomatos blitzed and herbed & reduced. 

20201022_192605.thumb.jpg.4914a757da7621e0e53f997ca6b29b73.jpg

 

Should have just made the planned dinner. Would have been quicker! 

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5 hours ago, Dejah said:

Dessert was Canadian Cheddar Cheese Apple Crisp

I will bite. Can you explain? I'm intrigued and a little scared by this. My brief google said it was inspired by the classic pairing of a piece of cheddar on a slice of apple pie - this is a new classic pairing for me. Is it a Canadian Tradition? Local? Looks delicious in any case! 

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16 minutes ago, CantCookStillTry said:

I will bite. Can you explain? I'm intrigued and a little scared by this. My brief google said it was inspired by the classic pairing of a piece of cheddar on a slice of apple pie - this is a new classic pairing for me. Is it a Canadian Tradition? Local? Looks delicious in any case! 

 

Not Canadian. Cheese and apple generally is a classic pairing. It dates back to Chaucer's time (died 1400) My very Scottish father (died 2008) ate apple pie with cheese all the time, so I did too. (Not dead yet.) It is believed that pie and cheese originated in Yorkshire, England and is often referred to as Yorkshire Pie.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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4 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Not Canadian. Cheese and apple generally is a classic pairing. It dates back to Chaucer's time (died 1400) My very Scottish father (died 2008) ate apple pie with cheese all the time, so I did too. (Not dead yet.)

Thanks! I get cheese and apple but I guess I've only had very sweet apple pies (not much of a dessert person) and couldn't quite imagine eating with cheese. I remember studying Chaucer, I would love to go back and explore the Canterbury Tales for Food Refs (probably won't) ... Can't really recall much but Red Hot Pokers these days.😂

Back to dinner.. 

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3 minutes ago, CantCookStillTry said:

I would love to go back and explore the Canterbury Tales for Food Refs

 

Back in the day, I wrote a paper on food in Chaucer. Not just the Canterbury Tales. His work is full of food.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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57 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Back in the day, I wrote a paper on food in Chaucer.

If you're saying back in the day I'm assuming there would be no PDF available 😞. Which is a shame as I would have loved to have a read. I feel some research coming on! After 

Dinner. 

Wow that Recipe is amazing by the way. Apples, pears, figs, raisins & spices am I right? With saffron? (He was more well off than I thought if it's the spice!). 

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6 minutes ago, CantCookStillTry said:

If you're saying back in the day I'm assuming there would be no PDF available 😞. Which is a shame as I would have loved to have a read. I feel some research coming on! After 

Dinner. 

Wow that Recipe is amazing by the way. Apples, pears, figs, raisins & spices am I right? With saffron? (He was more well off than I thought if it's the spice!). 

England actually produced a fair bit of saffron domestically, back in the day. Hence Saffron Walden, in Essex.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Decided to make sushi for some reason. I'm not much of a sushi eater myself, since I think it kind of misses the point without fish. But I do like vinegared sushi rice, and tamago sushi. The natto sushi was also quite unique and tasty. We enjoyed the meal overall, but we'll let the restaurant do the hard work next time.

 

 

PXL_20201012_101304292.jpg

PXL_20201012_101339685.jpg

Edited by shain (log)
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~ Shai N.

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1 hour ago, CantCookStillTry said:

If you're saying back in the day I'm assuming there would be no PDF available 😞. Which is a shame as I would have loved to have a read. I feel some research coming on! After 

Dinner. 

Wow that Recipe is amazing by the way. Apples, pears, figs, raisins & spices am I right? With saffron? (He was more well off than I thought if it's the spice!). 

 

Yes, you are right. Chaucer was well connected - friend of the KIng. He didn't go short.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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2130589312_Ducklegfauxconfitlentiscabbage10-21.jpeg.732fefb048fe85cc07eefc309b45b985.jpeg

 

The faux confit duck leg; these are just so damn good.

 

Over @rancho_gordo's French-style green lentils. Cooked in a tres-French style, with duck fat, leeks, carrot, bay leaves and fresh thyme.

Cabbage, sautéed with shallot and garlic, a bit of stock and red wine vinegar to finish.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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27 minutes ago, weinoo said:

2130589312_Ducklegfauxconfitlentiscabbage10-21.jpeg.732fefb048fe85cc07eefc309b45b985.jpeg

 

The faux confit duck leg; these are just so damn good.

 

Over @rancho_gordo's French-style green lentils. Cooked in a tres-French style, with duck fat, leeks, carrot, bay leaves and fresh thyme.

Cabbage, sautéed with shallot and garlic, a bit of stock and red wine vinegar to finish.

How do you do your faux confit?

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Just now, KennethT said:

How do you do your faux confit?

 

I started by following the Lebovitz method; Melissa Clark's is fine too. It morphed into mine, which is basically curing for a good day or day and a half. Kosher salt, bay leaves crumbled or herbes de Provence,  a few garlic cloves.

However, I don't start in a pan and then move to the oven. Basically, after the cure, they go uncovered, skin up, into a cold oven (I actually use the CSO) set at 250 - 275℉, for around 2 1/2 hours. Check 'em a few times during. I  then remove (and save) a lot of the fat, crank the heat to around 425℉ and blast them for the final 15 minutes.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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