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3 hours ago, kayb said:

 

@Paul Bacino, is that chili made with neckbones? Puts me in the notion for posole. I have some RG hominy and a big damn Boston Butt I could break down, use part for posole and part for carne adovada.....and probably have enough left for carnitas.

 

I used pork Flanken Style cut..so basically riblets

 

3 hours ago, kayb said:

 

 

 

Its good to have Morels

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3 hours ago, kayb said:

@patti, it may have been thin, but it looks fabulous. Got a recipe you care to share?

 

My method:

 

I sautéed one small diced onion, half a diced red bell pepper, and four minced garlic cloves in olive oil. I usually add kosher salt and black pepper to the veg while they sauté. 
 

Once softened, I added a 32 oz container of seafood stock and brought it to a boil. (When I have shrimp heads and shells, I make my own stock. I didn’t.)

 

Spooned about five or six  tablespoons of dark roux into the stock and let that simmer for 20 or 30 minutes. Thought it looked too thick (mistake!) and added some homemade chicken stock I had in the fridge. 

 

Hard boiled eggs are optional, but traditional in some parts of south Louisiana. It’s good! Potatoes are also optional. I didn’t use any last night, but added some today when I was reheating to thicken.* 
 

If you’re including potatoes, add them when you add the hard boiled eggs. I had some small red potatoes that I quartered. Simmer till potatoes are tender. 
 

Time for the shrimp. I had a pound and a quarter of wild caught Gulf shrimp, cleaned and deveined. I seasoned them with Tony Chachere’s and added to the stew. Three to five minutes later, it’s done. Taste for seasoning and then ladle over rice. 
 

*I removed all the shrimp from the stew when I was working on it today. I didn’t want them to be overdone. Once I was satisfied, I added them back in and turned off the fire, letting the heat from the stew bring them up to temp. 

Edited by patti (log)
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Dear Food: I hate myself for loving you.

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On 10/25/2020 at 12:35 AM, Dejah said:

One pane of glass broke in my two tiered knife rack, and it was made (by a kind friend) in such a way that I couldn't slide it out to replace or to clean.
Another retired friend, needing a project to work on in his shop, offered to make me a new one.
He made me TWO! I still need to treat the wood, then get glass inserts. Might have to buy some more knives to fill both racks! 😉
My friend wouldn't take any money, not even for the oak he used. Do I made him Cantonese Chow Mein to take home for supper.

I made a double batch, so we also had it for supper.

                                                    298279027_Kniferacks2471.jpg.695e9a44c798849d71b7d3cf95c20103.jpg

 

Dejah, would you please say how this is used?

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1 hour ago, TdeV said:

 

Dejah, would you please say how this is used?

This is the old knife rack. It sits on the window sill above my counter and sink. The new one will be longer - 18" and also two tiers.

                                             367088477_KnifeonWindow2473.jpg.b1ff98664ded9eb954f6e73031dd7fb1.jpg

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Had a big tray of country-style pork ribs out to marinade for Char Siu. Took some and marinated with lemon juice, soy sauce, cumin, and fresh oregano.
Packed in foil and roasted at 300F for 2 hours.
Eaten with sweet potato and yu choy.

The juice from the ribs made a flavourful light gravy.

                                    

                                                      1360979504_GreekCountrystyleribs2479.jpg.66496b5323c29fac4ba91c140fca4f80.jpg

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Pizza night...canadian bacon, pepperoni, mushroom and banana pepper....and of course, salad

 

thumbnail_IMG_0032.jpg.13954c52e9ebe6c4fb0f8d4b60c1145d.jpg

 

thumbnail_IMG_0033.jpg.87ba1603a33889cd6bcc5d1b87313647.jpg

 

Yesterday Ronnie came in around 3 and said that oxtail ragu sounded good.  Without the IP, that wouldn't have been possible with that late of notice.  IP to the rescue!

 

thumbnail_IMG_0034.jpg.9d07b768522d44c429456a10158e7c2c.jpg

 

I didn't feel like making pasta.....still was good :)

 

thumbnail_IMG_0037.jpg.2c485e296c179ff8778980532100805f.jpg

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5 minutes ago, TdeV said:

@Shelby, your meals look so tasty!

What have you dusted the oxtail with?

That's so nice of you!  

 

Nothing fancy AT ALL lol.  Lawry's salt and plain ole black pepper.  I wouldn't have shown that at all except I have never opened a package of oxtail (really they are beef I'm sure) and had them still attached to each other like that.  

 

It's a pandemic....I'm easily entertained.

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3 hours ago, patti said:

 

My method:

 

I sautéed one small diced onion, half a diced red bell pepper, and four minced garlic cloves in olive oil. I usually add kosher salt and black pepper to the veg while they sauté. 
 

Once softened, I added a 32 oz container of seafood stock and brought it to a boil. (When I have shrimp heads and shells, I make my own stock. I didn’t.)

 

Spooned about five or six  tablespoons of dark roux into the stock and let that simmer for 20 or 30 minutes. Thought it looked too thick (mistake!) and added some homemade chicken stock I had in the fridge. 

 

Hard boiled eggs are optional, but traditional in some parts of south Louisiana. It’s good! Potatoes are also optional. I didn’t use any last night, but added some today when I was reheating to thicken.* 
 

If you’re including potatoes, add them when you add the hard boiled eggs. I had some small red potatoes that I quartered. Simmer till potatoes are tender. 
 

Time for the shrimp. I had a pound and a quarter of wild caught Gulf shrimp, cleaned and deveined. I seasoned them with Tony Chachere’s and added to the stew. Three to five minutes later, it’s done. Taste for seasoning and then ladle over rice. 
 

*I removed all the shrimp from the stew when I was working on it today. I didn’t want them to be overdone. Once I was satisfied, I added them back in and turned off the fire, letting the heat from the stew bring them up to temp. 

So the seasoning is the salt and pepper, aromatics, and then the Chachere's on the shrimp? OK, I can do that. Thanks!

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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5 minutes ago, kayb said:

So the seasoning is the salt and pepper, aromatics, and then the Chachere's on the shrimp? OK, I can do that. Thanks!

 

I added some more Chachere's to the whole dish after all was said and done.

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Dear Food: I hate myself for loving you.

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Chickpea cutlets with sriracha ranch dressing (made with yellow sriracha), sides of steamed chard, and kohlrabi with home-made vinaigrette (native vinegar, olive oil, herbs de Provence)

122957332_1001069903725615_6502229008146324641_n.jpg

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More of the country-style pork ribs with Patak Vindaloo paste and fresh curry leaves.  I love lots of onions and bell peppers with this.
Cooked up some brown basmati rice with cardamom seeds, and roasted cauliflower.
Cold bitter wind today while cleaning up more leaves, so this hit the spot.

                                                                      517549292_CurriedPork2481.jpg.79f3c1b93b5669f8c5da44335eb890c0.jpg

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Liangpi (or should it be called liangfen in this case?).

Wheat flour is separated into starch and gluten.

The starch is diluted to a batter and steamed, then sliced into thick noodles (this is why I think it might be liangfen rather than liangpi - the latter having the batter steamed in similar to rice noodles making). 

The gluten is steamed into seitan and braised with star anise, fennel seeds, bay leaves and MSG..

Served cold - the dressing is home made chili oil, black rice vinegar, garlic, sugar, soy sauce, Sichuan peppercorn, a bit of star anise. I added some silken tofu. Cucumber, peanuts.

 

PXL_20201019_184323633.thumb.jpg.a60cd2922f2ae0eb6dc970ca4fea74c5.jpg

 

Mixed well.

PXL_20201019_185429216.thumb.jpg.5f6cee78e53214b59f113858d75cf979.jpg

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~ Shai N.

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For his birthday dinner last night mi esposo requested duck confit.  Served with Brussels sprouts in a butter-garlic sauce and a berry-morita chile dipping sauce.  

confit.jpg

Edited by gulfporter (log)
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AE48D7A6-1FBE-41DC-9038-D4BB99BF2FDB.thumb.jpeg.e0835605634c4e581b1ad10cbd6679e1.jpeg
 

Very slow roasted sweet potato with miso butter. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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cool weather and turkey chili. Used whole dried chilis and the flavor was great- 2 anchos, 2 mulato, 2 arbol, 2 morita and 2tbl of tomato paste.

Topped with pickled jalapeños, chopped onion, cilantro, avocado and sour cream.

IMG_2687.JPG

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2 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

If made from wheat, I would say it's 凉皮 (liáng pí).

 

凉粉 (liáng fěn), although similar, is made from beans - usually mung beans.

 

 

 

Thanks, I thought so but wasn't 100% sure if the name is based on the starch source or rather the noodle shape (since [edited] liang pi meaning "skin" might suggest the latter).

Edited by shain (log)

~ Shai N.

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2 minutes ago, shain said:

 

Thanks, I thought so but wasn't 100% sure if the name is based on the starch source or rather the noodle shape (since liang meaning"skin" might suggest the latter).

 

No.  凉 (liáng) means "cold". 皮 (pí) means "skin". 凉粉 (liáng fěn) means "cold noodles".

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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5 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

No.  凉 (liáng) means "cold". 皮 (pí) means "skin". 凉粉 (liáng fěn) means "cold noodles".

 

Sorry, that was a mistype (obviously, with liang being common in both terms).

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~ Shai N.

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