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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


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3 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

Thank you! Sounds good.  What about the leg quarters?  

At Thanksgiving I sv the breast and roast the dark meat in the BSO along with the skin. A traditional looking serving plate with nontraditional moist breast.

 

I've tried to sv the breast with skin on and then sear to crisp it up. It's never come out right.  For some reason duck breast skin renders and crisps, but Turkey fights it. It may be that the turkey has a curved surface and isnt much in contact w the pan. If that's it, a couple mm oil might fix the issue

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14 hours ago, gfweb said:

You'll get more impressive results from using a pork loin.  super juicy and ⁰tender

I never bothered to try. I didn’t get much help so I figured why bother. But thanks for thinking of me. Some of these threads are overran by people and I’m not about to fight for answers in a message board. 

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4 hours ago, MetsFan5 said:

I never bothered to try. I didn’t get much help so I figured why bother. But thanks for thinking of me. Some of these threads are overran by people and I’m not about to fight for answers in a message board. 

I'd be happy to help.

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I *think* I am cooking venison ribs chops sous vide.  I say it that way because the order I got from D'Artagnan months ago did not have labels on all the cuts, so the venison porterhouse and chops to me look the same in the packages.  I did my best to guess.  Whatever they are, I'm sure they will be good.

 

 

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Inspired by this I have cooked a pork chop for one hour at 54.5°C and I’m now cooking some carrots at 85°C for two hours. It doesn’t seem to matter how much cutlery I put in to the bag with vegetables they continue to float. I have done the displacement method but if I put my whole cutlery drawer in there I swear it would still float. Chef Steps advises one spoon. I can only assume that it weighs somewhere close to 10 kg in order for it to work!

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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1 hour ago, Anna N said:

Inspired by this I have cooked a pork chop for one hour at 54.5°C and I’m now cooking some carrots at 85°C for two hours. It doesn’t seem to matter how much cutlery I put in to the bag with vegetables they continue to float. I have done the displacement method but if I put my whole cutlery drawer in there I swear it would still float. Chef Steps advises one spoon. I can only assume that it weighs somewhere close to 10 kg in order for it to work!

When you figure out how to get carrots to sink, I'll nominate you for a Nobel Prize.

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MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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11 minutes ago, MelissaH said:

When you figure out how to get carrots to sink, I'll nominate you for a Nobel Prize.


‘Buy some sous vide weights (or use makeshift) and double bag.

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14 minutes ago, MelissaH said:

When you figure out how to get carrots to sink, I'll nominate you for a Nobel Prize.

I put a spoon in the bag

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23 minutes ago, lindag said:


‘Buy some sous vide weights (or use makeshift) and double bag.

Been there. Done that. Carrots still float!

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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21 minutes ago, gfweb said:

I put a spoon in the bag

I would like to see the spoon that weighs enough to keep my carrots from floating.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 minute ago, Anna N said:

Been there. Done that. Carrots still float!

My experiences match Anna's. Spoons in the bag float for me as well.

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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58 minutes ago, MelissaH said:

My experiences match Anna's. Spoons in the bag float for me as well.

When my carrots finish cooking I am going to weigh the bag.
 

404 G.  That includes two carrots. hefty magnets and other hunks of various metals make up the rest. It’s still floats. Attempts to put bowls plates etc. over it are unsuccessful they simply slide off. There are no easy answers despite what everybody tries to tell me. I’ve tried every trick in the book and some that aren’t in the book.

Edited by Anna N
to add the weight and other comments (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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13 minutes ago, Anna N said:

I would like to see the spoon that weighs enough to keep my carrots from floating.

You need smaller carrots.

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@Anna N - damn.  Now I have to worry about floating vegetables.  Do you use vacuum bags or ziplock?  Also, have you tried putting a heavy plate over it?

 

Well, I owe a huge thank you to @btbyrd and @gfweb!  I ended up doing a mash up of the advice I got from both of you.  I carved up the raw turkey – took the breasts off with no bone, but skin still attached and took the leg quarters off also with the skin attached.  I put salt and pepper on them, placed them in vacuum bags (leg quarters in one bag and breasts in the other), placed some sage leaves on the bottom of each piece and vacuum sealed the bags:

DSCN0718.JPG.35ecb2ec4e054ba4c8759307f8caef8b.JPG

 

DSCN0719.JPG.c29ff9028a596682cbd459e8880b04e3.JPG

The leg quarters went in at 148F at midnight – and came out at 5:30pm the next day.  The breasts went in at 1pm, same temp, and came out at the same time.  I seared all four pieces in ghee in a large cast iron skillet and they were gorgeous:

DSCN0727.JPG.5e32003e7e59d95a938d49d63b03ee06.JPG

The breast meat just glistened:

DSCN0728.JPG.af788d65b1ec92760ce223ba24f7232c.JPG

Every bite was incredibly moist and tender and delicious.  I decided on 148F because I know that we prefer the texture of poultry when it is a little more done. This was not just the best turkey I’ve ever made, but perhaps the best I’ve ever tasted:

DSCN0729.JPG.225de0f67131040de58927bea6bf9147.JPG

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16 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

damn.  Now I have to worry about floating vegetables.  Do you use vacuum bags or ziplock?  Also, have you tried putting a heavy plate over it?

Trust me I have tried everything ever mention by anybody anywhere or at any time and none of them work. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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FWIW, I use ziplock baggies and the water displacement method. I clip the baggies to the side of the pot. Sometimes, no matter how much I try to remove all of the air, the bags float. When that happens, I clip a spoon on the outside of the baggie to keep it submerged. Pretend there is water in the pot and food in the baggie in the photo below.
 

F0242FF8-C886-42DC-8500-7EF1581D2D71.thumb.jpeg.eb6bfd1a0d65ce80338c607d592b821e.jpeg
 

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@Anna N, I turn this rack on its side and it keeps carrots (and everything else) as much underwater as possible. For things which are larger than 1.75" (4.45 cm) – the space between the racks – I put another upside down rack on top of what I'm trying to hold underwater. Which works way better than spoons.

 

SousVide Supreme Universal Pouch Rack

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5 minutes ago, TdeV said:

@Anna N, I turn this rack on its side and it keeps carrots (and everything else) as much underwater as possible. For things which are larger than 1.75" (4.45 cm) – the space between the racks – I put another upside down rack on top of what I'm trying to hold underwater. Which works way better than spoons.

 

SousVide Supreme Universal Pouch Rack

This might work in the appropriate vessel but I don’t think it will work in the one I use.But I thank you I have sworn off vegetables cooked sous vide.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Finally some time to post... made sous vide duck breast using Kenji's Serious Eats recipe https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2010/09/sous-vide-101-duck-breast-recipe.html. I would definitely make this again! Don't worry, the duck fat was saved and frozen for future use. Duck was seared in my Darto pan and skin was browner than pictured (odd lighting). When serving, I included some Darbo lingonberry conserve on the side (I like tart fruits with duck).

931126241_IMG_5861-duckbreast-sousvide-sear-2020feb.jpg.1da409a895bd9976086db6329d7eb598.jpg

 

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On 3/18/2020 at 5:11 PM, TdeV said:

@Anna N, I turn this rack on its side and it keeps carrots (and everything else) as much underwater as possible. For things which are larger than 1.75" (4.45 cm) – the space between the racks – I put another upside down rack on top of what I'm trying to hold underwater. Which works way better than spoons.

 

SousVide Supreme Universal Pouch Rack

It’s the one I use

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On 3/18/2020 at 11:06 PM, Anna N said:

Trust me I have tried everything ever mention by anybody anywhere or at any time and none of them work. 

 

If you have a pasta cooker (like this one), then you can put the carrot bag in the pot of the pasta cooker, put the basket of the pasta cooker over the carrot bag, fill with hot water, put your sous-vide machine and launch it. If the basket is not heavy enough, then add a weight over it.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Teo

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