Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


FrogPrincesse
 Share

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, lindag said:

I’ve got fresh beets on my grocery order.

CI recommends olive oil, beets, sherry vinegar, thyme, s&p.

191F for 4 to 6 hours.

I LOVE beets!

 

I too am a huge beet fan, but I like mine with balsamic rather than sherry vinegar.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I'm anovaing some pork back ribs at the moment, 58C.

 

Hmm. I’ve a rack or two in the freezer waiting for me to smoke them. 
But I find bbq ribs an overrated PITA. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, ElsieD said:

 

I too am a huge beet fan, but I like mine with balsamic rather than sherry vinegar.

If you like 'em with balsamic, try pomegranate molasses sometime. A similar balance of sweet and tart, but with some nice fruity notes. And the color is much more complementary. :P

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I start cooking in my circulator I sometimes want to move the unit to another area in the kitchen to get it out of my work area (it cooks for such a long time).

if I unplug it and move it to another outlet does it lose its memory (mine is a Joule)?  Then what?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, lindag said:

When I start cooking in my circulator I sometimes want to move the unit to another area in the kitchen to get it out of my work area (it cooks for such a long time).

if I unplug it and move it to another outlet does it lose its memory (mine is a Joule)?  Then what?

 

Then buy an anova.

 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, lindag said:

When I start cooking in my circulator I sometimes want to move the unit to another area in the kitchen to get it out of my work area (it cooks for such a long time).

if I unplug it and move it to another outlet does it lose its memory (mine is a Joule)?  Then what?

The Joule was specifically aimed at people who did not want a huge set up in their kitchen. It will work in almost any pot. I frequently use it in the stainless steel insert of my Instant Pot. I love the Joule because it gave me back my kitchen real estate! 

  • Like 2

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The beets turned great.  I used the CI recipe for my first attempt.  Went for 6-1/2 hours because they were pretty big.

so good tha I’m ordering more to try with the balsamic and with the pomegranate molasses.

No such thing as too many beets.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If anyone wants to tiptoe into the sous vide experience at a very inexpensive cost, I have an extra brand new Secura model sv-617 and an Anova vac sealer also new, never used and at least a 100 vac bags, two sizes.  These were Gifts and I already have both a sous vide circulator I have used only a few times and my big vac sealer and several boxes of the bag strips where you make your own sizes.

The Anova vac sealer is new on the market.

 

$60. plus shipping.  Will not be a lot if you are on the West coast.  weight total of the items is 9 pounds.  You can go to USPS click and ship to calculate the cost. my zip code is 93535

 

I am running out of room to store things.      Contact me by  Private mail.

 

Could be a gift for someone too.

Edited by andiesenji (log)
  • Like 2

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I broke down a packer brisket this morning, removing point from flat.  Both are in the SV bath and will get used for a get together on my daughter’s birthday the 25th aka Christmas, along with her in-laws and family and a few friends.   
 

interestingly, the vac bags have puffed and are now floating after a few hours in the bag.   I did sprinkle some pink curing salt on the surface of the meat to force a pink “smoke ring”.     I plan to finish the meat on the grill or smoker on the day to be served 

 

I  used a steel sharpening plate to hold them down but am thinking of rebagging since I really want them to be fully submerged 

 

Okay so just rebagged, removing air and any liquid that had formed.   The liquid was quite salty from the pink curing salt.   Multiple clay tiles applied to make sure they stay submerged.  Fingers crossed

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, scubadoo97 said:

I broke down a packer brisket this morning, removing point from flat.  Both are in the SV bath and will get used for a get together on my daughter’s birthday the 25th aka Christmas, along with her in-laws and family and a few friends.   
 

interestingly, the vac bags have puffed and are now floating after a few hours in the bag.   I did sprinkle some pink curing salt on the surface of the meat to force a pink “smoke ring”.     I plan to finish the meat on the grill or smoker on the day to be served 

 

I  used a steel sharpening plate to hold them down but am thinking of rebagging since I really want them to be fully submerged 

 

Okay so just rebagged, removing air and any liquid that had formed.   The liquid was quite salty from the pink curing salt.   Multiple clay tiles applied to make sure they stay submerged.  Fingers crossed

I would be worried. I have never had a bag of meat puff up nor have I ever had a properly vacuum sealed package of meat float. Vegetables float for sure unless you can weigh them down. But meat?  Hope somebody else chimes in on this. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@scubadoo97, I have had meat puff up quite a few times. Twice the lamb shanks smelled off (to me): once DH thought they smelled fine and ate anyway (nothing untoward happened to him or MIL) , once I threw away; ALL the other times, the meat was fine.

 

The explanation I read is that the inflated bag is pressurized vapour.

 

I think you could tell by smell. But you won't know until you open the bag, so a backup plan might be wise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Anna N said:

I would be worried. I have never had a bag of meat puff up nor have I ever had a properly vacuum sealed package of meat float. Vegetables float for sure unless you can weigh them down. But meat?  Hope somebody else chimes in on this. 

Me neither but....This was in the first hour of cooking.  Again I had applied pink salt and liquid smoke in the bag.  After rebagging all is snug as a rug.  It was a cryo packed whole brisket from Costco.  I ate a burger, medium rare ,  made from the trimmings with no issues 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Doodad
      Has anybody tried making a dark roux in a pressure cooker? Can this be done without scortching do you think? I have made roux in the oven before and started wondering about this topic.
    • By kostbill
      I really want to improve the flavor of my chicken breast so I want to try to inject brine with fat and flavors.
       
      I would like to try brining with some hydrocolloids. The one example I found is this: https://torontofoodlab.com/2013/08/20/meat-tenderizing-with-a-carrageenan-brine/.
       
      However I cannot apply that to my chicken breast because I am cooking it sous vide, so the chicken will not reach the temperature needed for the carrageenan to gel.
       
      I am thinking of using Methyl cellulose, first disperse in hot water, then leave it for 24 hours in the fridge, then add salt, fat and flavors and inject it.
      I am afraid that until it reaches the 50C or 60C that the Methyl cellulose needs in order to gel, the liquid will escape.
      Any ideas?
      Thanks.
    • By Anonymous Modernist 760
      Thanks for putting up this forum 🙂
      I would like to bake using a combination of sous vide and a conventional oven. Would it be possible to put the dough in a vacuum bag cook it sous vide at 37C for the dough to raise optimal and then put it in a conventional oven?
      Thanks
    • By PedroG
      Utilization of meat leftovers from sous-vide cooking
      Sometimes when you buy a nice cut of meat, your eyes are bigger than your and your beloved's stomach. So what to do with the leftovers?
      In Tyrolia (Austria) they make a "Gröstl", in Solothurn (Switzerland) they make a "Gnusch", in the Seftigenamt (a region in the Swiss canton Berne) they make a "Gmüder", and we (Pedro and SWAMBO) make a varying concoct using ideas from all of the three. We call it "Gröstl", but it is not necessarily a typical Tyrolean Gröstl, and it is different each time, and we usually do not top it with a fried egg as they do in Austria.
      Ingredients

      All your meat leftovers
      Onion (compulsory)
      Any hard vegetable (we prefer celery stalks, or zucchini)
      Any salad (iceberg lettuce or endive/chicory or any other salad leaves, may contain carrot julienne)
      Fried potatoes, or alternatively sweetcorn kernels
      Sherry or wine or bouillon or the gravy you preserved from your last LTLT.cooked meat for simmering (I usually prefer Sherry)
      Eventually some cream (or crème fraîche)
      Salt, pepper, parsley, caraway seeds (typical for Tyrolean Gröstl), paprika, condiment (in Switzerland we use "Aromat" by Knorr, which contains sodium chloride, sodium glutamate, lactose, starch, yeast extract, vegetable fats, onions, spices, E552)'
      vegetable oil (I prefer olive oil)




      Mise en place

      cut your meat in small cubes or slices
      cut the onion(s) not too fine (place the first cut below your tongue to avoid tearing during cutting)
      cut the vegetables about 3-4 mm thick
      cut the salads to pieces smaller than 4 cm, distribute on the cutting board and season deliberately
      cut the potatoes to 1 cm cubes
      place 3 heavy skillets with ample oil on the stove

      Cooking

      in skillet 1, stir-fry the onions, add the hard vegetables still stir-frying, add salad, add sufficient liquid (Sherry or wine or bouillon or gravy) for simmering under a cover until soft. If desired, reduce heat and add some cream at the end.
      in skillet 2, stir-fry the potatoes until soft (in case of sweetcorn kernels, add to skillet 1 after stir-frying and use skillet 2 for skillet 3)
      in skillet 3, as soon as the vegetables and the potatoes are soft, sear the meat in just smoking oil for 30-60 seconds, then add to skillet 1

      Serving
      You may mix the potatoes with the vegetables and meat to make a rather typical Gröstl, or serve the fried potatoes separately; we prefer the latter, as the potatoes stay more crunchy.
      Do not forget to serve a glass of good dry red wine!
    • By PedroG
      Brisket „Stroganoff“ Sous Vide With Mixed Mushrooms

      Ingredients for 2 servings
      about 400g well marbled Brisket
      3 tablespoons rice bran oil or other high smoke point oil (grapeseed oil)
      3 tablespoons extravirgin olive oil
      3 tablespoons Cognac (brandy)
      2 small onions, finely diced
      ½ yellow or red bell peppers cut into strips
      90 g mixed mushrooms
      100 ml of gravy from last Brisket (or concentrated stock)
      1 teaspoon mustard, Dijon type
      1 teaspoon paprika mild (not spicy!)
      1 medium pickled cucumber cut into thin strips
      2 tablespoons parsley, finely chopped
      approx. 120g sour cream with herbs
      Sous Vide - cooking
      Marinate brisket with Mexican style (medium hot) marinade in the vacuum bag for at least 3 days at 1 ° C, cook sous vide 48 hours at 55.0 ° C.
      Preparing the sauce
      At a moderate heat sauté onions in olive oil, add peppers (preblanched in the microwave oven for 2-3 minutes) and mushroom mixture, stir-fry, remove from heat and add the gravy. Add pickled cucumber, pepper, mustard and cognac. Put on very low heat, add sour cream and keep warm, but do not boil as the cream will separate. Remove the brisket from the bag, cut into strips (about 8x10x35mm), sear very quickly in smoking-hot rice bran oil, add the meat and the parsley to the sauce.
      Serving
      Serve on warmed plates. Typically served with spätzle (south German) or chnöpfli (Swiss).
      And don't forget a glass of good red wine!
      Enjoy your meal!
      Pedro

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...