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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


FrogPrincesse
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2 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Not a problem. Click.

 

 

Thanks for that link, Anna. Questions:

Did you use less spinach than the recipe suggests? 

What would you do differently, if anything, to cut down the richness?

 

I may be trying this recipe very soon, since it looks good and I happen to have everything except that much spinach. 

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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23 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Thanks for that link, Anna. Questions:

Did you use less spinach than the recipe suggests? 

What would you do differently, if anything, to cut down the richness?

 

I may be trying this recipe very soon, since it looks good and I happen to have everything except that much spinach. 

Wish I had had spinach but I didn’t. I don’t know that I would want to cut down the richness. I think it’s better to have less and enjoy it than try to modify its claim to fame. It was sort of like an orzotto/risotto? I suppose you could cook the orzo separately and just toss it with a little butter but that would just not be the same. In the end you will have to do what you think is best for your taste. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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On 1/3/2020 at 10:56 AM, Anna N said:

Wish I had had spinach but I didn’t. I don’t know that I would want to cut down the richness. I think it’s better to have less and enjoy it than try to modify its claim to fame. It was sort of like an orzotto/risotto? I suppose you could cook the orzo separately and just toss it with a little butter but that would just not be the same. In the end you will have to do what you think is best for your taste. 

 

I made this tonight as per the instructions.  Incredibly rich, incredibly delicious.  It's a keeper, for sure.

20200108_195900.jpg

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50 minutes ago, ekfc63 said:

Looks great.  Wondering if this dish can be made with olive oil for those that are dairy intolerant

 

 

If you make butter poached anything with olive oil then you have an entirely different dish.I could not imagine this made with olive oil.  Your mileage may vary. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Olive Oil [ really good olive oil , not the most expensive BTW ]

 

taste a certain way.

 

Butter dishes , again good fresh butter 

 

taste in the matter of Butter

 

its true  Butter has some emulsified water in it ....

 

but baking aside 

 

they are very different 

 

each might be optimized for the ingredients strengh's

 

but butter is not olive oil , nor vis a versa

 

I hope to make the butter shrimp orzo spinach soon

 

as i have or can easily get all the ingredients 

 

butter has a very different sort of richness 

 

vs olive oil .

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High quality sirloin 8 hours at 54.5C. Seared on Philips Avance Grill. It was 7cm thick. I cut it into smaller pieces to facilitate cooking. 

 

Collected continuous internal temperature monitoring once again. Interesting it took 3 hours for internal temperature to reach 54. I might start looking at different durations beyond that. The advice for this type of cut varies between 4 and 12 (or longer) hours. 

 

Seared one piece pre- and post-sous vide and the other only post. No difference between them in taste.  

IMG_0908.thumb.PNG.bebf677059ddc0f0f50b8a2e44a1c7b4.PNG

IMG_0904.thumb.jpg.309ce8d6b941419a7ca774ea03534108.jpgIMG_0911.thumb.jpg.7e489b78feb99a85599fa8a7fc468b5d.jpgIMG_0915.thumb.jpg.46ed6a1e28ac2f50a4e29f680b42745f.jpgIMG_0916.thumb.jpg.207efeda52d01ac506fa153f7287199e.jpg

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, mjbarnard said:

Seared one piece pre- and post-sous vide and the other only post. No difference between them in taste.

 

Thanks for posting this. Did you notice a difference in texture?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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2 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

Thanks for posting this. Did you notice a difference in texture?

No discernible difference in texture. Furthermore I cut the fat off before sous-vide the one which was seared pre and post. Therefore I chilled the one with fat on slightly longer so that I could really sear the fat without cooking the meat. 

 

This photo shows plate with meat seared pre and post. the one in post above was post. Not great pics but no real difference that we could discern. 

 

IMG_0917.thumb.jpg.797ae5a89b33823258edca7cee77fa8c.jpg

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 This might strike many of you as a “just because you can doesn’t mean you should” moment. But not so fast, me hearties.  
 

I was asked this morning about time and temperature for a hard-boiled egg sous vide. I had never heard of it and it struck me as an odd question. But I decided to do some research. 
 

I found recommendations for temperatures and times all over the place. I also ran across comments that said eggs cooked this way were completely unsuitable for devilled eggs because the white would not set properly and the yolk would be too creamy. 
 

Undaunted, I went with the recommendations of the Chef Steps site: 90°C for 20 minutes then ice bath. 
 

0F1ECB45-E77C-4ACE-850A-F1436B0D5BA1.thumb.jpeg.f893c907aa391eb85c7199a2cab33352.jpeg

 

Peeled after a short while in the ice bath. 
 

902BE0F1-E183-4CDD-99EA-37A6B58BAD5B.thumb.jpeg.962ac65a520975c3b51871cec2a9cef5.jpeg

 

Firm but not rubbery white, no green/grey lines and a fully cooked but still creamy yolk. 

 

1268EE04-DD5F-4FBD-A2A2-479DDEE86D93.thumb.jpeg.c98fd1a539663cf1e7d63ce10c15466a.jpeg

 

  This would make a perfectly fine devilled egg but I just put a little salt on it and ate it the way it was and I must say it was fantastic. 

 

I cooked only one egg but there’s no reason that you couldn’t cook as many as your vessel will hold.
 

It is always good to have another tool to turn to when perhaps you are limited with other options such as when all the burners on your range are in use or this method just happens to suit your time schedule better than others. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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22 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 This might strike many of you as a “just because you can doesn’t mean you should” moment. But not so fast, me hearties.  
 

I was asked this morning about time and temperature for a hard-boiled egg sous vide. I had never heard of it and it struck me as an odd question. But I decided to do some research. 
 

I found recommendations for temperatures and times all over the place. I also ran across comments that said eggs cooked this way were completely unsuitable for devilled eggs because the white would not set properly and the yolk would be too creamy. 
 

Undaunted, I went with the recommendations of the Chef Steps site: 90°C for 20 minutes then ice bath. 
 

 

 

Peeled after a short while in the ice bath. 
 

 

 

Firm but not rubbery white, no green/grey lines and a fully cooked but still creamy yolk. 

 

 

 

  This would make a perfectly fine devilled egg but I just put a little salt on it and ate it the way it was and I must say it was fantastic. 

 

I cooked only one egg but there’s no reason that you couldn’t cook as many as your vessel will hold.
 

It is always good to have another tool to turn to when perhaps you are limited with other options such as when all the burners on your range are in use or this method just happens to suit your time schedule better than others. 

 

I'll have to try this, I steamed one egg last night for Shrimp Louie and put it over boiling water for 12 minutes; I thought it was pretty perfect.

I have not had success (yet) with poached eggs...they've turned out with too runny whites.

Do you have a secret for poached eggs?

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Just now, lindag said:

Do you have a secret for poached eggs?

Nothing that you can count on. It has been hit or miss for me with some successes but a lot more failures. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 minute ago, Anna N said:

Nothing that you can count on. It has been hit or miss for me with some successes but a lot more failures. 

 

I've tried many times and temperatures.  One ChefSteps recommendations is 90 minutes for fully set whites but who has that much time for an egg?

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Just now, lindag said:

 

I've tried many times and temperatures.  One ChefSteps recommendations is 90 minutes for fully set whites but who has that much time for an egg?

Oh yes that is the issue with sous vide. I can see it makes sense if you are poaching a whole bunch of eggs and can re-heat them when ready to serve but I can’t see me waiting 90 minutes for a poached egg in the morning. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Ive done SBE's in the past as above.

 

I can't ref.  my times and temps , as that notebook is missing.

 

more or less :    SV 1 - 2 doz  eggs , direct from the refrig ,  time and temp missing here

 

then rapidly chill , and dry off.  place back in the refrig.

 

in AM :  take two eggs out , for example.   I had have an old OXO small salad spinner 

 

w the hard white plastic insert that had broken.  I add hot tap water to the outer plastic container

 

again temp not available    and the basket , which is set on three plastic jug caps , to keep the basket off the

 

bottom of the outer container.  add the eggs , and microwave for   , a set time.   the caps keep the eggs in the center of the

 

hot water.   then I go about my AM business :  make the coffee , feed the cat , etc etc

 

make some toast.    then crack the SBE's over the hot toast , and scoop out any remaining egg white , if any

 

presto , two soft boiled eggs on toast in the morning.

 

the part I liked about this method , is its fool proof , and does not require any timed attention.

 

the Oxo water bath ended up just heating the precious cooked eggs to serving temp , and did not change

 

the eggs texture.   I might have to try this again.  works well

 

and its mind-less , a key in the AM while waiting for the Coffee.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I think I posted this method in the very early pages of this thread.

 

i might have a glass or two of a Young but Amusing TJ's Red

 

and look through the thread soon.

 

all i can thhink is that that notebook  got buried in some newspapers a

 

and got recycled.

 

it had my egg methods , my pressure steamed potato and PS Beet times in it.

 

Ill take some notes , and if they remain legible , ill re post.

 

SBE  in the shell are very good on hot toast , and so easy to do.

 

they do not truthfully compare w water-poached eggs cooked to the same temps

 

something about the skins on the WPE that makes them very special.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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27 minutes ago, rotuts said:

SBE  in the shell are very good on hot toast , and so easy to do.

 

they do not truthfully compare w water-poached eggs cooked to the same temps

 

something about the skins on the WPE that makes them very special.

I think this is very important to understand. Poached eggs and soft boiled eggs are just not the same. Poached eggs are the product of a technique we call poaching and I don’t think you can get them any other way. It’s like oven fried chicken. It can be very good but it’s not the same as fried chicken. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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After digging around for other recommended SV egg-poaching times and temps I gave up and pulled out old egg poaching pan (a W-S purchase from about 15 years ago).  Voila!  Perfect eggs.  My search is over.

What”s old is new again.  Either that or you can’t teach an old dog...

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Ok I’m going to give this a go. I just got a 1.28lb whole irl tenderloin from Wegmans that has seasoning on it. 
 

how do I figure out the time and temp? I have an Anova. I prefer my pork medium well and want to sear it in a hot pan after taking it out of the SV bath then serve. Does that seem like a reasonable plan? 
 

(running off to actually take the Anova out of its box!)

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21 minutes ago, MetsFan5 said:

Ok I’m going to give this a go. I just got a 1.28lb whole irl tenderloin from Wegmans that has seasoning on it. 
 

how do I figure out the time and temp? I have an Anova. I prefer my pork medium well and want to sear it in a hot pan after taking it out of the SV bath then serve. Does that seem like a reasonable plan? 
 

(running off to actually take the Anova out of its box!)

 

I do it at 140 for 3 hours.

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