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FrogPrincesse

What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)

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About 8 months ago I made some spicy blueberry chutney sous vide. It filled 4 oz pickling jars which had been through the dishwasher more than a day before. The lids were put on loosely. Then it was cooked sous vide.

 

In the meantime, my remaining jar has been kept in the fridge. I just opened it (it made a sucking noise as the seal was broken) and there is no mold at the top of the jar.

 

It tasted really good.

 

Is it safe?

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2 hours ago, TdeV said:

It tasted really good.

 

Is it safe?

 

We should know soon.

 

Seriously, I think I'd eat it.

 

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I feel rather foolish! I'm running a dual sous vide cook: eye of round beef roast in one pot, and chicken breasts in another. (Those breasts are being cooked at 140F per @Shelby's recommmendation, to see whether I prefer it to the 145F I used last time.)  Dual cooks require both of my sous vide circulators, so I put the Joule to work on the roast and the Anova to work on the chicken. It's been noted many times before that the Joule is quieter than the Anova (with the downside that the Joule requires the cell phone app to control). I was quite put out by the persistent, loud rattle of the Anova. That is, I was put out until I tightened the screw that holds it in its collar. Problem solved. Why has it taken me so long to try that? :blush:

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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@Smithy

 

no matter.  always better to spot these things at some point.

 

if you don't care for 140 F chicken , I think you might consider 142.5 F

 

seems trivial , but its not.   note the Jus in the bag

 

lower temps make nice starter gravy.

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30 minutes ago, Smithy said:

I feel rather foolish! I'm running a dual sous vide cook: eye of round beef roast in one pot, and chicken breasts in another. (Those breasts are being cooked at 140F per @Shelby's recommmendation, to see whether I prefer it to the 145F I used last time.)  Dual cooks require both of my sous vide circulators, so I put the Joule to work on the roast and the Anova to work on the chicken. It's been noted many times before that the Joule is quieter than the Anova (with the downside that the Joule requires the cell phone app to control). I was quite put out by the persistent, loud rattle of the Anova. That is, I was put out until I tightened the screw that holds it in its collar. Problem solved. Why has it taken me so long to try that? :blush:

 

What temp and for how long are you doing the eye of round?

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Just now, ElsieD said:

 

What temp and for how long are you doing the eye of round?

 

130F, and for now I'm planning 30 hours. I know someone did this cut and posted about it, but I haven't found the post(s) in question yet for guidance. It may need longer. Do you know?


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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4 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

130F, and for now I'm planning 30 hours. I know someone did this cut and posted about it, but I haven't found the post(s) in question yet for guidance. It may need longer. Do you know?

 

I did know because I tried it once and thought it was great for sandwiches.  I'll see if I can find it.

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4 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

I did know because I tried it once and thought it was great for sandwiches.  I'll see if I can find it.

 

Yes, please post it again if you find it.

 

I found a couple of references in this topic, although not yours:

Kerry Beal planned to do hers at 55C for 24 hours, after salting and letting it sit overnight. I don't think she reported back, but she had intended it for sandwich meat, which is my purpose as well.

Topham cooked it at 131F for 15 hours a couple of years ago, and said it might could have used more time but it wasn't tough. Rats! I forgot rotuts' trick of treating it with RB40 for 3 - 6 days first. OTOH I wouldn't have been able to do this project at all with that lead time.

 

 


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Baldwin suggests

 

for eye of the R  130 F

 

24 - 48 h

 

so 36 h might make something nice for

 

tomorrow sandwich.  sliced thin.

 

I can't see this cut for a " Roast Beef Dinner "  i.e. hot.

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PS  : RB40 Ive only done for 48  hours

 

w meat that might have been nice w/o

 

E of the R  : maybe 3 days no more.

 

if in doubt when sliced thin for that SW on WW :

 

Mayo , and just enough of it 

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I did mine for 24 hours.  I must have tried it three times.   My notes say:

134F good

135F too cooked (mushy)

133F good, try 132 next time.

 

Hope this helps.

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7 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

Yes, please post it again if you find it.

 

I found a couple of references in this topic, although not yours:

Kerry Beal planned to do hers at 55C for 24 hours, after salting and letting it sit overnight. I don't think she reported back, but she had intended it for sandwich meat, which is my purpose as well.

Topham cooked it at 131F for 15 hours a couple of years ago, and said it might could have used more time but it wasn't tough. Rats! I forgot rotuts' trick of treating it with RB40 for 3 - 6 days first. OTOH I wouldn't have been able to do this project at all with that lead time.

 

 

Liked it at 24 hours.

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OK, next question: 24 hours isn't an option for me tomorrow because of my work schedule. My choices would be up to 19 hours or after 31 hours. I'm leaning toward the 31 hour mark. Might that be too much? Am I better off pulling it in the morning after 19 hours?


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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more time will be fine at 130 F

 

higher temps are not so forgiving.

 

pick a convenient time thats over 31 hours.

 

do you plan a rapid chill then cold refrigeration ?

 

that's more important .

 

keep some notes on this and future SV projects

 

SV always gets a bit better w personal experience.

 

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Yes, I have been keeping a log of times, temps, seasonings and results. I do plan on a rapid chill and refrigeration; that's why I have the window where it has to either be stopped or continue cooking.

 

Of course, I may come home to find that the Joule quit when I took my cell phone away from it, but I don't think it will do that. If it does, the meat will have been pasteurized already so the interrupted cook won't be an issue if I understand the food safety issue correctly; I just won't know the total time at 130F.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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in theory :

 

the meat will  only stay pasteurized at or above 130 F

 

depending on your container ,  if not insulated , it may fall 

 

w/o additional heat to keep it above 130 F

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1 hour ago, rotuts said:

in theory :

 

the meat will  only stay pasteurized at or above 130 F

 

depending on your container ,  if not insulated , it may fall 

 

w/o additional heat to keep it above 130 F

 

Once it's pasteurized, it'll stay pasteurized until the seal is broken, won't it? Am I missing something?


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Pasteurized is not sterilized.

 

pasteurized milk , in a sealed carton will go bad at room temp.

 

same w SV.   even SV will go bad in a refrigerator eventually.

 

look into the ' danger-zone - temps for SV

 

 

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13 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

Once it's pasteurized, it'll stay pasteurized until the seal is broken, won't it? Am I missing something?

@rotuts is right - pasteurization kills just about all the bacteria that is present, but not the spores.  So, in the danger zone, spores can activate and create more bacteria.

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3 hours ago, rotuts said:

Pasteurized is not sterilized.

 

pasteurized milk , in a sealed carton will go bad at room temp.

 

same w SV.   even SV will go bad in a refrigerator eventually.

 

look into the ' danger-zone - temps for SV

 

 

 

UHT pasteurized milk is room temperature shelf stable for three months.

 

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I made two stupid big layered chicken terrines for the hot weather.  Costco had a sale on b-l-s-l chicken breast and I picked up the smallest packet I could find because I really don't like CB, but wanted to play with terrine recipes.  A Paula Deen recipe I stumbled across in my searches seemed closest to what I wanted to do.  I used full size loaf pans and vacuum sealed them to compress.  I double bagged them for safety.  65C for 3-4 hours ( I lost track) per info from other internet searches.

 

The layers are chicken, grated parm, ham pieces, sausage slices, lots of fresh basil, roasted peppers and asparagus and pistachios.   I think the layers geology will change as I get deeper into the terrine.  The chicken is juicy and jellied, and the flavors of the other ingredients are evident.  I'm having the ugly end slice as my lunch with a blob of Maille pistachio and orange mustard that is getting geriatric on the shelf.  I think terrine sandwiches are in the future.

Screen Shot 2019-08-20 at 2.35.28 PM.png

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