Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


Recommended Posts

About 8 months ago I made some spicy blueberry chutney sous vide. It filled 4 oz pickling jars which had been through the dishwasher more than a day before. The lids were put on loosely. Then it was cooked sous vide.

 

In the meantime, my remaining jar has been kept in the fridge. I just opened it (it made a sucking noise as the seal was broken) and there is no mold at the top of the jar.

 

It tasted really good.

 

Is it safe?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I feel rather foolish! I'm running a dual sous vide cook: eye of round beef roast in one pot, and chicken breasts in another. (Those breasts are being cooked at 140F per @Shelby's recommmendation, to see whether I prefer it to the 145F I used last time.)  Dual cooks require both of my sous vide circulators, so I put the Joule to work on the roast and the Anova to work on the chicken. It's been noted many times before that the Joule is quieter than the Anova (with the downside that the Joule requires the cell phone app to control). I was quite put out by the persistent, loud rattle of the Anova. That is, I was put out until I tightened the screw that holds it in its collar. Problem solved. Why has it taken me so long to try that? :blush:

  • Like 2
  • Haha 3
  • Confused 1

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to post
Share on other sites

@Smithy

 

no matter.  always better to spot these things at some point.

 

if you don't care for 140 F chicken , I think you might consider 142.5 F

 

seems trivial , but its not.   note the Jus in the bag

 

lower temps make nice starter gravy.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Smithy said:

I feel rather foolish! I'm running a dual sous vide cook: eye of round beef roast in one pot, and chicken breasts in another. (Those breasts are being cooked at 140F per @Shelby's recommmendation, to see whether I prefer it to the 145F I used last time.)  Dual cooks require both of my sous vide circulators, so I put the Joule to work on the roast and the Anova to work on the chicken. It's been noted many times before that the Joule is quieter than the Anova (with the downside that the Joule requires the cell phone app to control). I was quite put out by the persistent, loud rattle of the Anova. That is, I was put out until I tightened the screw that holds it in its collar. Problem solved. Why has it taken me so long to try that? :blush:

 

What temp and for how long are you doing the eye of round?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, ElsieD said:

 

What temp and for how long are you doing the eye of round?

 

130F, and for now I'm planning 30 hours. I know someone did this cut and posted about it, but I haven't found the post(s) in question yet for guidance. It may need longer. Do you know?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

130F, and for now I'm planning 30 hours. I know someone did this cut and posted about it, but I haven't found the post(s) in question yet for guidance. It may need longer. Do you know?

 

I did know because I tried it once and thought it was great for sandwiches.  I'll see if I can find it.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

I did know because I tried it once and thought it was great for sandwiches.  I'll see if I can find it.

 

Yes, please post it again if you find it.

 

I found a couple of references in this topic, although not yours:

Kerry Beal planned to do hers at 55C for 24 hours, after salting and letting it sit overnight. I don't think she reported back, but she had intended it for sandwich meat, which is my purpose as well.

Topham cooked it at 131F for 15 hours a couple of years ago, and said it might could have used more time but it wasn't tough. Rats! I forgot rotuts' trick of treating it with RB40 for 3 - 6 days first. OTOH I wouldn't have been able to do this project at all with that lead time.

 

 

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to post
Share on other sites

Baldwin suggests

 

for eye of the R  130 F

 

24 - 48 h

 

so 36 h might make something nice for

 

tomorrow sandwich.  sliced thin.

 

I can't see this cut for a " Roast Beef Dinner "  i.e. hot.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

PS  : RB40 Ive only done for 48  hours

 

w meat that might have been nice w/o

 

E of the R  : maybe 3 days no more.

 

if in doubt when sliced thin for that SW on WW :

 

Mayo , and just enough of it 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

Yes, please post it again if you find it.

 

I found a couple of references in this topic, although not yours:

Kerry Beal planned to do hers at 55C for 24 hours, after salting and letting it sit overnight. I don't think she reported back, but she had intended it for sandwich meat, which is my purpose as well.

Topham cooked it at 131F for 15 hours a couple of years ago, and said it might could have used more time but it wasn't tough. Rats! I forgot rotuts' trick of treating it with RB40 for 3 - 6 days first. OTOH I wouldn't have been able to do this project at all with that lead time.

 

 

Liked it at 24 hours.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, next question: 24 hours isn't an option for me tomorrow because of my work schedule. My choices would be up to 19 hours or after 31 hours. I'm leaning toward the 31 hour mark. Might that be too much? Am I better off pulling it in the morning after 19 hours?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to post
Share on other sites

more time will be fine at 130 F

 

higher temps are not so forgiving.

 

pick a convenient time thats over 31 hours.

 

do you plan a rapid chill then cold refrigeration ?

 

that's more important .

 

keep some notes on this and future SV projects

 

SV always gets a bit better w personal experience.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I have been keeping a log of times, temps, seasonings and results. I do plan on a rapid chill and refrigeration; that's why I have the window where it has to either be stopped or continue cooking.

 

Of course, I may come home to find that the Joule quit when I took my cell phone away from it, but I don't think it will do that. If it does, the meat will have been pasteurized already so the interrupted cook won't be an issue if I understand the food safety issue correctly; I just won't know the total time at 130F.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to post
Share on other sites

in theory :

 

the meat will  only stay pasteurized at or above 130 F

 

depending on your container ,  if not insulated , it may fall 

 

w/o additional heat to keep it above 130 F

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rotuts said:

in theory :

 

the meat will  only stay pasteurized at or above 130 F

 

depending on your container ,  if not insulated , it may fall 

 

w/o additional heat to keep it above 130 F

 

Once it's pasteurized, it'll stay pasteurized until the seal is broken, won't it? Am I missing something?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pasteurized is not sterilized.

 

pasteurized milk , in a sealed carton will go bad at room temp.

 

same w SV.   even SV will go bad in a refrigerator eventually.

 

look into the ' danger-zone - temps for SV

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

Once it's pasteurized, it'll stay pasteurized until the seal is broken, won't it? Am I missing something?

@rotuts is right - pasteurization kills just about all the bacteria that is present, but not the spores.  So, in the danger zone, spores can activate and create more bacteria.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, rotuts said:

Pasteurized is not sterilized.

 

pasteurized milk , in a sealed carton will go bad at room temp.

 

same w SV.   even SV will go bad in a refrigerator eventually.

 

look into the ' danger-zone - temps for SV

 

 

 

UHT pasteurized milk is room temperature shelf stable for three months.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I made two stupid big layered chicken terrines for the hot weather.  Costco had a sale on b-l-s-l chicken breast and I picked up the smallest packet I could find because I really don't like CB, but wanted to play with terrine recipes.  A Paula Deen recipe I stumbled across in my searches seemed closest to what I wanted to do.  I used full size loaf pans and vacuum sealed them to compress.  I double bagged them for safety.  65C for 3-4 hours ( I lost track) per info from other internet searches.

 

The layers are chicken, grated parm, ham pieces, sausage slices, lots of fresh basil, roasted peppers and asparagus and pistachios.   I think the layers geology will change as I get deeper into the terrine.  The chicken is juicy and jellied, and the flavors of the other ingredients are evident.  I'm having the ugly end slice as my lunch with a blob of Maille pistachio and orange mustard that is getting geriatric on the shelf.  I think terrine sandwiches are in the future.

Screen Shot 2019-08-20 at 2.35.28 PM.png

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
  • Delicious 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By kostbill
      I really want to improve the flavor of my chicken breast so I want to try to inject brine with fat and flavors.
       
      I would like to try brining with some hydrocolloids. The one example I found is this: https://torontofoodlab.com/2013/08/20/meat-tenderizing-with-a-carrageenan-brine/.
       
      However I cannot apply that to my chicken breast because I am cooking it sous vide, so the chicken will not reach the temperature needed for the carrageenan to gel.
       
      I am thinking of using Methyl cellulose, first disperse in hot water, then leave it for 24 hours in the fridge, then add salt, fat and flavors and inject it.
      I am afraid that until it reaches the 50C or 60C that the Methyl cellulose needs in order to gel, the liquid will escape.
      Any ideas?
      Thanks.
    • By Anonymous Modernist 760
      Thanks for putting up this forum 🙂
      I would like to bake using a combination of sous vide and a conventional oven. Would it be possible to put the dough in a vacuum bag cook it sous vide at 37C for the dough to raise optimal and then put it in a conventional oven?
      Thanks
    • By PedroG
      Utilization of meat leftovers from sous-vide cooking
      Sometimes when you buy a nice cut of meat, your eyes are bigger than your and your beloved's stomach. So what to do with the leftovers?
      In Tyrolia (Austria) they make a "Gröstl", in Solothurn (Switzerland) they make a "Gnusch", in the Seftigenamt (a region in the Swiss canton Berne) they make a "Gmüder", and we (Pedro and SWAMBO) make a varying concoct using ideas from all of the three. We call it "Gröstl", but it is not necessarily a typical Tyrolean Gröstl, and it is different each time, and we usually do not top it with a fried egg as they do in Austria.
      Ingredients

      All your meat leftovers
      Onion (compulsory)
      Any hard vegetable (we prefer celery stalks, or zucchini)
      Any salad (iceberg lettuce or endive/chicory or any other salad leaves, may contain carrot julienne)
      Fried potatoes, or alternatively sweetcorn kernels
      Sherry or wine or bouillon or the gravy you preserved from your last LTLT.cooked meat for simmering (I usually prefer Sherry)
      Eventually some cream (or crème fraîche)
      Salt, pepper, parsley, caraway seeds (typical for Tyrolean Gröstl), paprika, condiment (in Switzerland we use "Aromat" by Knorr, which contains sodium chloride, sodium glutamate, lactose, starch, yeast extract, vegetable fats, onions, spices, E552)'
      vegetable oil (I prefer olive oil)




      Mise en place

      cut your meat in small cubes or slices
      cut the onion(s) not too fine (place the first cut below your tongue to avoid tearing during cutting)
      cut the vegetables about 3-4 mm thick
      cut the salads to pieces smaller than 4 cm, distribute on the cutting board and season deliberately
      cut the potatoes to 1 cm cubes
      place 3 heavy skillets with ample oil on the stove

      Cooking

      in skillet 1, stir-fry the onions, add the hard vegetables still stir-frying, add salad, add sufficient liquid (Sherry or wine or bouillon or gravy) for simmering under a cover until soft. If desired, reduce heat and add some cream at the end.
      in skillet 2, stir-fry the potatoes until soft (in case of sweetcorn kernels, add to skillet 1 after stir-frying and use skillet 2 for skillet 3)
      in skillet 3, as soon as the vegetables and the potatoes are soft, sear the meat in just smoking oil for 30-60 seconds, then add to skillet 1

      Serving
      You may mix the potatoes with the vegetables and meat to make a rather typical Gröstl, or serve the fried potatoes separately; we prefer the latter, as the potatoes stay more crunchy.
      Do not forget to serve a glass of good dry red wine!
    • By PedroG
      Brisket „Stroganoff“ Sous Vide With Mixed Mushrooms

      Ingredients for 2 servings
      about 400g well marbled Brisket
      3 tablespoons rice bran oil or other high smoke point oil (grapeseed oil)
      3 tablespoons extravirgin olive oil
      3 tablespoons Cognac (brandy)
      2 small onions, finely diced
      ½ yellow or red bell peppers cut into strips
      90 g mixed mushrooms
      100 ml of gravy from last Brisket (or concentrated stock)
      1 teaspoon mustard, Dijon type
      1 teaspoon paprika mild (not spicy!)
      1 medium pickled cucumber cut into thin strips
      2 tablespoons parsley, finely chopped
      approx. 120g sour cream with herbs
      Sous Vide - cooking
      Marinate brisket with Mexican style (medium hot) marinade in the vacuum bag for at least 3 days at 1 ° C, cook sous vide 48 hours at 55.0 ° C.
      Preparing the sauce
      At a moderate heat sauté onions in olive oil, add peppers (preblanched in the microwave oven for 2-3 minutes) and mushroom mixture, stir-fry, remove from heat and add the gravy. Add pickled cucumber, pepper, mustard and cognac. Put on very low heat, add sour cream and keep warm, but do not boil as the cream will separate. Remove the brisket from the bag, cut into strips (about 8x10x35mm), sear very quickly in smoking-hot rice bran oil, add the meat and the parsley to the sauce.
      Serving
      Serve on warmed plates. Typically served with spätzle (south German) or chnöpfli (Swiss).
      And don't forget a glass of good red wine!
      Enjoy your meal!
      Pedro

    • By PedroG
      Olla podrida sous vide
      Origin
      Not rotten pot, but mighty or rich pot! Originated in 16th century Spain, olla poderida became olla podrida and was falsely translated into French as pot-pourri.
      Ingredients
      For two servings
      * 100g Brisket well marbled, cooked SV 48h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Pork meat well marbled, cooked SV 24h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Lamb chops without bone, cooked SV 4h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chicken breast, cooked SV 2h/58°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chorizo, sliced approximately 4mm †
      * 125g Chickpeas (garbanzos), soaked overnight in water †
      * 1 Onion chopped medium-fine †
      * ½ Savoy cabbage approx. 200g cut into pieces, thick leaf veins removed
      * ½ Celeriac approx. 200g quartered, sliced about 2mm
      * 2 Carrots sliced approximately 120g about 3mm
      * 1 Leek approximately 20cm / 100g sliced about 5mm
      * Extra virgin olive oil
      * Rice bran oil
      * Dried parsley qs, aromatic, black pepper
      † Beef, pork, lamb and chicken (or at least two kinds of meat) as well as chorizo, chickpeas and onions are mandatory ingredients, other vegetables vary according to desire and availability.
      Cooking
      Boil chickpeas in water for 30-60 min.
      Sauté onions in olive oil, add chorizo, continue sautéing, add chickpeas including its cooking water, add remaining vegetables, cover and cook to the desired softness, stir from time to time. If additional liquid is needed, you may add Sherry instead of water.
      Reduce heat. Season to taste. Add parsley.
      In a heavy skillet, sear the meat dice in just smoking hot rice bran oil (very high smoking point allows very quick sear, not overdoing the center of the meat).
      Sear one kind of meat at a time and transfer to the pan with the vegetables.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...