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FrogPrincesse

What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)

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re-reminded of the ATK foolish 1/4 cup of oil :

 

I do a lot of SV .  in bulk . chill and freeze

 

that means Ive opened a lot of SV bags.

 

one notes the bags have various amounts of ' jus ' in them

 

and Im sure some of you have spilled that on your counter , hopefully not w the 1/4 cup of oil to top the mess up.

 

a long time ago I noticed the perfect answer , right next to my work area :

 

728691753_SVholder.thumb.jpg.f52065edbe80815bce63b71170674fb3.jpg

 

I have a double sink .  deep and very very deep.  so deepI wondered why I put it in.

 

the noticed both sinks fit a standard sized dish drying tray.   the deep sink gets one in the usual configuration , for drying washed dishes.  the deep deep on

 

gets that a same dish holder l upside down , above , so I can reach the dishes easily that need washing.   I have some back issues and Id never be able to to to the bottom 

 

of this deep deep sink.

 

note the areas on the sides of this arraignment .  when I open a bag of SV , I take out the SV item , and place the bag in these crevices until Im ready to use the Jus

 

or discard down the drain.   sorry , no SV bags were available for this pic.  hope you get the idea

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13 hours ago, gfweb said:

America’s Test Kitchen did a sous vide show today. Decent. Best tip was SV poached eggs 167f for 12 minutes. 

 

They tried to stay uncomplicated but In doing that  missed the principles...temp =doneness...time = tenderness

 

How set were the whites?  I here slimy whites.

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for review purposes :

 

1.jpg.3a2e8c8b9adecdcd18845f2880fb04d0.jpg

 

sv2.jpg.95e7dcd3b8c0bfd5ca647204a071e29f.jpg

 

white's still attached to the shell

 

3.jpg.00f479502faee625ade412df1cb051e2.jpg

 

some whites ' split '

 

sv4.jpg.6d8f2e411b2fc5a4610b9bc9d0f80c84.jpg

 

over all , leaving editing aside , looks like a simple method worth a try.

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2 hours ago, ElsieD said:

 

How set were the whites?  I here slimy whites.

They looked good. I love the idea, poaching eggs is unreliable in my hands. 

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Id like to try this w a doz or so eggs.

 

rapidly chill in ice water

 

then store in the refig

 

and retherm w ' just the right temp '  water while i Feed the Cat , get the Espresso going , decide on the toast etc

 

for every day AM eating.

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I saw the AtK episode a few weeks back. Since it's from the current season, you can see the video online at their website. Although despite what they claim in the video, this isn't a new technique. Chefsteps has a similar recipe up on their site which appears to be at least five years old, and they mention on that page that others have also come up with the same time and temp guidelines.

 

Although I've had the Joule for almost 8 months now, I have somehow yet to use it for eggs. I'll have to rectify that soon and try this.

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This is what I got after 12 minutes at 167F.  The whites were still runny and a lot of the white was left in the shell.  Tried some more at 170, and 172.  At 170 the whites were a bit firmer.  At 172 only the yolk popped out and not surprisingly, was overcooked.  I also tried one out of it's shell in a zip lock, after 8 minutes at 172 the whites were runny and the yolk was almost hard.  I am trying one more for 15 minutes atc167F.

20190414_125755.jpg

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Posted (edited)

I had done cold large eggs (Costco) at 167F (Joule) for 13 minutes and got results of what *I* would deem acceptable as a traditional poached egg texture.  YMMV due to personal taste.   Whites will stick to the shell in a layer when cracked.  I didn't take any pictures though.  I also use a silicone net bag to hold the eggs in the water.

 

adding Chefsteps 167F egg link, (pre-Joule release apparently)


Edited by lemniscate adding link (log)

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Posted (edited)

This is the 167F egg for 15 minutes.  Whites were fine, yolk a bit too jammy.  I am going to try @lemniscate's time and see what happens.  Back in 15.

 

Edited to add picture

20190414_140004.jpg


Edited by ElsieD (log)
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Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

This is what I got after 12 minutes at 167F.  The whites were still runny and a lot of the white was left in the shell.  Tried some more at 170, and 172.  At 170 the whites were a bit firmer.  At 172 only the yolk popped out and not surprisingly, was overcooked.  I also tried one out of it's shell in a zip lock, after 8 minutes at 172 the whites were runny and the yolk was almost hard.  I am trying one more for 15 minutes atc167F.

20190414_125755.jpg

 

 

ATK did say that the white that would be in the poaching water would be stuck to the shell.  How they know this?

 

Seriouseats says 143F for 45 minutes


Edited by gfweb (log)

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@ElsieD

 

that's

 

 very interring 

 

Im doing my Taxes  

 

ie an extension tomorrow

 

while the Marathonistas 

 

run near my house

 

1 - 2 minutes walking to see then

 

I do love a poached egg

 

Ill try to do my best to look into this myself

 

are your eggs cols ?  etc

 

this week I will try to fined something that works for me

 

as eggs are now $ 0.99 a doz for large 

 

after passing the problem of Taxes for later 

 

Im Free !

 

BTW

 

two window in my home are 

 

*****   Open *****

 

suprise.gif.1a0fd8a4dfd17eb77d3371f7960f7c84.gif

 

money-mouth.gif.48d46c08f093a01e576084c9f64bee49.gif

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Last one - 13 minutes at 167F.  It had the best shape and the least white left in the shell.  The yolk was nice and runny.  But the underneath part still had some, though not a lot of what I call slimy white.  It was the best one of the bunch.  I still have quite a few eggs so am going to read up on Serious Eats and Chef Steps and practice some more this week.  

20190414_143151.jpg

20190414_143117.jpg

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@ElsieD

 

nice

 

Im not sure what you mean by

 

the underneath part

 

Im have not tried this

 

but Im guessing you will have whites in the shell

 

no matter what

 

you could use a teaspoon and get them out

 

I don't think this method will give you

 

100 % egg , on your toast 

 

so once you get your personal time

 

gently spoon out the whites in the shell if you like them

 

thaks for your work here

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35 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

Last one - 13 minutes at 167F.  It had the best shape and the least white left in the shell.  The yolk was nice and runny.  But the underneath part still had some, though not a lot of what I call slimy white.  It was the best one of the bunch.  I still have quite a few eggs so am going to read up on Serious Eats and Chef Steps and practice some more this week.  

20190414_143151.jpg

20190414_143117.jpg

 

The "slimy" white as you call it is just the watery part of the egg white. If you look closely at an egg (say, crack one onto a plate) you'll notice a "firm" bit of white, and you'll notice a runny, watery bit of white that easily separates itself from the rest of the egg. This is the part (in an otherwise normal egg) that "feathers" in a traditional poach...in other words, its the bit that clouds and collects in your poaching pot. Anyone who has ever poached more than a couple eggs at a time knows what I'm talking about. 

 

The best thing to do is to use a large perforated spoon to drain this part of the egg off. I crack my sous vide eggs directly onto a slotted or perforated spoon, usually set over a paper towel, and let that watery egg bit slip off. You may need to tilt the spoon a bit. 

 

I assure you it is fully cooked it just looks weird. It is 100% normal and, unless you go to full hard boil stage, unlikely to go away completely. 

 

 

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@Qwerty  Thank you.  You know, that perforated spoon treatment is something I do before putting eggs to poach  directly in water.  Never thought of it here.  Good idea.

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Now....if one were, as @rotuts suggested, cook a dozen or so of these for retherming later, what method, time and temp would one use? I could see doing this IF I could retherm in say, two minutes in a saucepan of simmering water, or steam-bake in the CSO, but I'm not inclined to drag out the Anova every time I want a poached/softboiled egg on toast.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Posted (edited)

some time ago

 

i made poached eggs some sort of way, Ill have to look over some notes

 

and chilled and refrigerated.

 

I took two out of the refrigerator , cold

 

and added into hot tap water , in a plastic bowl w a plastic ' strainer

 

and older OXO salad spinner I saved

 

and put them in the plastic stainer w a few pastil caps to keep the eggs away from the edge

 

and micro''d on full power for 30 or 40 seconds

 

and then let them be while I did other things

 

cracked them over buttered hot toast at the last minute when the rest of breakfast was ready

 

and was happy w the result.  they were hot , perfectly done for me

 

and there was a little hot-runny egg white

 

which I didn't mind on the toast , made some interesting sl soggy bits

 

that was what I wa thinking  about

 

really good poached eggs

 

w the last step in the AM mindless , but with a delicious result.

 

Ill have to try that again.

 

BTW :  ATK  didn't tell us how many eggs were cracked to get those few seconds of Egg Shots

 

nor why should they ?

 

perfect is after some editing Id guess  .   still tasty !

 

just saying.


Edited by rotuts (log)
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4 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Last one - 13 minutes at 167F.  It had the best shape and the least white left in the shell.  The yolk was nice and runny.  But the underneath part still had some, though not a lot of what I call slimy white. 

 

In the chefsteps comments, someone noted that 13 min 30 sec was the sweet spot for the set whites (no residue)  vs. luscious yolk at 167F.  

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Heston has a method of poaching eggs in his "How to cook like Heston" series where he places the eggs in water that has boiled but the heat has turned off and the temperature is monitored and the egg is added at ~72C (I think its been a while). It works a treat but the really interesting bit in his process is the same as @Qwerty says.

Its a while since I viewed the Heston  video, but I am pretty sure he says that the amount water (which is the runny stuff) is determined by how old the egg is. I think he says that the water is a result of the "aging" process  of the protein (white), where it actually starts to dehydrate. Also the "air sack" increases in size with time.

Certainly freshly laid eggs produce a lot less water than store bought eggs. I don't think it has anything to do with free range or cage eggs, its a matter of how long the egg stayed on the store shelf & how long it stayed in your fridge.

You cant get rid of the water unless you break the egg.

Perhaps you could brine the egg and let osmosis move the water from inside the egg to the brine, but the time in the brine would be dependent on how fresh the egg was, and not sure what else it would extract.

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16 hours ago, rotuts said:

some time ago

 

i made poached eggs some sort of way, Ill have to look over some notes

 

and chilled and refrigerated.

 

I took two out of the refrigerator , cold

 

and added into hot tap water , in a plastic bowl w a plastic ' strainer

 

and older OXO salad spinner I saved

 

and put them in the plastic stainer w a few pastil caps to keep the eggs away from the edge

 

and micro''d on full power for 30 or 40 seconds

 

and then let them be while I did other things

 

cracked them over buttered hot toast at the last minute when the rest of breakfast was ready

 

and was happy w the result.  they were hot , perfectly done for me

 

and there was a little hot-runny egg white

 

which I didn't mind on the toast , made some interesting sl soggy bits

 

that was what I wa thinking  about

 

really good poached eggs

 

w the last step in the AM mindless , but with a delicious result.

 

Ill have to try that again.

 

BTW :  ATK  didn't tell us how many eggs were cracked to get those few seconds of Egg Shots

 

nor why should they ?

 

perfect is after some editing Id guess  .   still tasty !

 

just saying.

 

Thanks, @rotuts That's simple enough to accomplish when you're stumbling about the kitchen half-asleep, which is my aim.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Posted (edited)

I used the ChefSteps / AtK method to make poached eggs today and posted the results on the Lunch thread.

 

 

The yolks were slightly more set than ideal, but that may have been due to the length of time it took for me to plate the dish, as well as putting the eggs atop hot polenta. The whites were perfect, although as expected the loose white remained in the shell.


Edited by chord (log)
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@rotuts  what time and temperature did you use for your eggs?

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This steak was moistened with RB 40 fish sauce at sat in the fridge for 48 hours.  Cooked tonight sous vide for 1 1/2  hours at 133F then seared.  No fishy taste.  It was unbelievably tender, but it was a pretty good quality chunk of neat to start with.

20190415_190035.jpg

20190415_185739.jpg

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On 4/14/2019 at 8:53 AM, gfweb said:

I thought that was odd

 

it would be odd if once they were not clueless

 

 

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@ElsieD

 

I don't remember the times for the eggs

 

how was the flavor of  your RB40 Steak ?

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