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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


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16 hours ago, ElsieD said:

This steak was moistened with RB 40 fish sauce at sat in the fridge for 48 hours.  Cooked tonight sous vide for 1 1/2  hours at 133F then seared.  No fishy taste.  It was unbelievably tender, but it was a pretty good quality chunk of neat to start with.

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that sounds pretty cool and experimental. like..you fermented the steak with the fish sauce and the bacteria (or enzymes?) broke down the "protein structural bonds?" thereby tenderizing it and producing a more richer flavor maybe also? 

 

I have the ??? marks because I don't know the exact term bc I don't have a science background and my memory of how the process works is too hazy and unpracticed 

 

but interesting to see more fermented meat product experiments (I heard with koji?) 

 

there's just too many steps and work for me but maybe I should do a test for a dinner party one day if it's super wow  

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11 hours ago, rotuts said:

@ElsieD

 

I don't remember the times for the eggs

 

how was the flavor of  your RB40 Steak ?

 

The flavour of the steak was good, but I did not notice any difference from a non-RB40'd steak.  I will say it was very tender, but it was a well-marbled AAA grade to begin with.

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6 hours ago, eugenep said:

that sounds pretty cool and experimental. like..you fermented the steak with the fish sauce and the bacteria (or enzymes?) broke down the "protein structural bonds?" thereby tenderizing it and producing a more richer flavor maybe also? 

 

I have the ??? marks because I don't know the exact term bc I don't have a science background and my memory of how the process works is too hazy and unpracticed 

 

but interesting to see more fermented meat product experiments (I heard with koji?) 

 

there's just too many steps and work for me but maybe I should do a test for a dinner party one day if it's super wow  

 

I wouldn't call it fermenting.  The fish sauce was just a very thin film, a few drops per side at the most.  I don't have a science background either.

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@ElsieD

 

if you do this again , tryn a little more RB40

 

the flavor of the finished steak is different than w/o

 

for me in a good way.

 

can't really say what that flavor is   certainly not fishy nor salty.

 

 

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3 hours ago, rotuts said:

@ElsieD

 

if you do this again , tryn a little more RB40

 

the flavor of the finished steak is different than w/o

 

for me in a good way.

 

can't really say what that flavor is   certainly not fishy nor salty.

 

 

 

I would love to see a cost/benefit analysis between Prime Now/WF DAS and RB40.  My money (or in this case American tax payers' money) is on the DAS.

 

Your tax dollars at work.

 

 

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@JoNorvelleWalker

 

SousVide

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYylFWl7_1Q&frags=pl%2Cwn

 

has used

 

https://sansaire.com/steak-aging-sauce/

 

in an experiment.  it contains fish sauce + lots of other stuff,  I don't remember if they used RB40 alone

 

you have to understand their tastes and that they are big meat eaters.

 

I don't know how to search their youtube site to see if RB40 come up

 

I do know I like the RB40 effect , and probably would get more of that effect if I used more RB40 , understanding that

 

there is no fish flavor nor did the steaks get salty.

 

then there is the Takii experiment

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEVHPtcRLcE&frags=pl%2Cwn

 

on the other hand , 125 cc of RB40 might last a lifetime

 

here it is

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbVbwzqHeSA&frags=pl%2Cwn

 

but not w RB40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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RB40 is really different than other Fish Sauces

 

I watched the SVE vid , and can't recall their FS choice

 

it was not RB40

 

RB40 has no medicinal flavors what so ever , on my palate.

 

the Boys @ SVE have very particular tastes.

 

and like ' meat' as   Steak if you get my drift

 

 and like their steak more done than I do

 

once you8 take that into account in their reviews , and don't mind their ' style "

 

they have done a lot of experiments I then do not have to do.

 

I wouldn't might a Box or Two of the outstanding Meat they get for their Vids

 

I hope complementary  of course.

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 I have two of my favourite cuts of beef (chuck eyes) in at 54.5°C for 24 hours.  These were a gift and I’m looking forward to enjoying some perfectly cooked beef tomorrow evening.  

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

It's what I'm hoping to be cooking sous vide tomorrow:  Amazon had pork tenderloin on sale.  And they actually sent it to me, unlike the salmon that was supposed to have been dinner for tonight.

 

As far as I can recall I've never cooked pork tenderloin sous vide before.  What are suggested times and temperatures?

 

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2 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

It's what I'm hoping to be cooking sous vide tomorrow:  Amazon had pork tenderloin on sale.  And they actually sent it to me, unlike the salmon that was supposed to have been dinner for tonight.

 

As far as I can recall I've never cooked pork tenderloin sous vide before.  What are suggested times and temperatures?

 

 

I do 140F for I hour.

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9 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I'm thinking the core won't reach 140F in that time.  Is this intentional?

 

 

I've never taken the temperature.  I just know it comes out the way I like it.  I'll be watching to see what others say in case I've been doing it wrong.

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2 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

It's what I'm hoping to be cooking sous vide tomorrow:  Amazon had pork tenderloin on sale.  And they actually sent it to me, unlike the salmon that was supposed to have been dinner for tonight.

 

As far as I can recall I've never cooked pork tenderloin sous vide before.  What are suggested times and temperatures?

 

 

It cooks so fast I've never SVd it. Usually its pounded and sauteed ...or browned and then roasted  for a 10-15 minutes at 350F.

 

I guess SV 140 F for  an hour.

 

But I'd brown and roast. Faster and reliable.

Edited by gfweb (log)
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4 minutes ago, gfweb said:

 

It cooks so fast I've never SVd it. Usually its pounded and sauteed ...or browned and then roasted  for a 10-15 minutes at 350F.

 

I guess SV 140 F for  an hour.

 

But I'd brown and roast. Faster and reliable.

 

 

I'm still open to ideas, I could go for schnitzel.  Indeed I am one person and there is enough tenderloin for schnitzel, roasting, and sous vide.

 

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I have tried Pork tenderloin SV quite a few times at different temperatures and times. Because its very lean, it seems to me it doesn't seem to become as tender as I would expect. Perhaps the connective tissue is different and doesn't break down or change like lamb or beef. It doesn't take too much time to become dry. Mind you it breaks apart very easily but it seems dry to me. I have had some success by adding marinades before cooking.

The best way I now have to cook pork tenderloin is actually covered in a low oven (100C) for a couple of hours in BBQ sauce then  uncover for another half hour to thicken the sauce. I actually add hot chilli sauce to the BBQ sauce to give it a bite.

By the way I always used to just BBQ pork tenderloin fillets but I also found it was a bit hit & miss as to how tender it came out. The taste was always fine, its just the variation in tenderness I found annoying. Perhaps it was more to do with the raw ingredients. I am just not sure.

 

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10 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

It's what I'm hoping to be cooking sous vide tomorrow:  Amazon had pork tenderloin on sale.  And they actually sent it to me, unlike the salmon that was supposed to have been dinner for tonight.

 

As far as I can recall I've never cooked pork tenderloin sous vide before.  What are suggested times and temperatures?

 

 

I used 135F for slightly over 2 hours the last time I tried it, after checking various recommendations (mostly in this topic, starting here). I rubbed it first with oil, pimentón and a grilling rub; after the 2 hours I gave it a quick sear to brown the exterior. I thought it was pretty good, but it's such a lean cut of meat that it needed extra fat. I ended up using most of it for sandwiches, like this:

 

20190314_120455.jpg

 

I liked the results well enough, but came away thinking that the meat would benefit from being cooked with something that would add more flavor and a bit of fat. @FauxPas mentioned here that she'd had good success with a char siu treatment of pork tenderloin...but then, that isn't sous vide and she still needed to add fat. 

 

Based on my results above, I don't think I'd go hotter than 135F for sous vide, and given its small diameter I might even try a lower temperature: @rotuts had recommended 130F when I asked. It depends on how pink you like your pork, and you can see what I got with 135 and a quick sear.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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10 hours ago, gfweb said:

why buy cooked bacon?

 

I was just surprised to see sous vide has made it into the "convenience" section at Costco, with all the other heat and eat entree foods.  Pork Belly is not my thing, so I probably won't buy this. 

Sous vide is something I still struggle to explain to my friends who don't cook like I do.  They use the heat and eat foods way more than I do.  Trader Joe's was the only other place that had food (turkey legs) specifically labeled sous vide prep.

 

BTW, I buy the Kirkland pre-cooked bacon strips because I like them, they're easy to microwave in no time, and I'm not paying for the fat rendered out of uncooked bacon that I rarely use.  

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13 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

It's what I'm hoping to be cooking sous vide tomorrow:  Amazon had pork tenderloin on sale.  And they actually sent it to me, unlike the salmon that was supposed to have been dinner for tonight.

 

As far as I can recall I've never cooked pork tenderloin sous vide before.  What are suggested times and temperatures?

 

I do 2 1/2 hours at 135F and we really like it.  Moist and tender.  

 

This picture is from my very first tenderloin which I did at 140F.  Liked this a lot, too, but found that 135F was optimum for us.

 

P1081081.JPG.353880d4a1d37b85bb79fd03d0cfd999.JPG.cd537e7190f399ba71a4da21af77ff71.JPG

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35 minutes ago, Shelby said:

I do 2 1/2 hours at 135F and we really like it.  Moist and tender.  

 

This picture is from my very first tenderloin which I did at 140F.  Liked this a lot, too, but found that 135F was optimum for us.

 

P1081081.JPG.353880d4a1d37b85bb79fd03d0cfd999.JPG.cd537e7190f399ba71a4da21af77ff71.JPG

 

Did you sear that? Do you do a quick sear now, after your 135F cook?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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