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FrogPrincesse

What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

The sous vide steak was bagged with a bit of garlic powder and a few drops of liquid smoke.  Then salted for an hour while drying after removal from the bag.  The grilled steak was seasoned only with salt and then rested for an hour.

 

I cooked and ate the grilled steak first, for what it's worth, speaking as a quondam protein chemist.

 

 

Is there a reason why you didn't salt the SV steak in the bag?  I've always salted everything before adding it to the water bath, mainly because that's what most of the recipes I see do.

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15 minutes ago, chord said:

 

Is there a reason why you didn't salt the SV steak in the bag?  I've always salted everything before adding it to the water bath, mainly because that's what most of the recipes I see do.

 

Yes, there is a reason.  Salting early seems to make things taste funny.  But remember the steak in question sat a couple days in the refrigerator.

 

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Interesting. I've not noticed any off-taste, but I'm still an SV neophyte. I think I've only made steak three or four times. I'll need to do some experimenting.

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3 hours ago, rotuts said:

@JoNorvelleWalker

 

hopefully , you are not using salt w Iodine in it ?

 

it has an odd taste

 

Forty years at least since I've used iodized salt.  Probably more like fifty.

 

Both steaks were salted.  I didn't say the sous vide steak tasted odd.  It just didn't have much flavor.

 

 

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I wonder if I could ask for a recommendation on the time/temp to pasteurize eggs. I am out of town and my notebook of such facts is at home. Thanks!


"There are no mistakes in bread baking, only more bread crumbs"

*Bernard Clayton, Jr.

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55 minutes ago, BetD said:

I wonder if I could ask for a recommendation on the time/temp to pasteurize eggs. I am out of town and my notebook of such facts is at home. Thanks!

 

Two hours at 55C.  I'm doing up a batch at the moment.

 

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@JoNorvelleWalker... thanks much, I want to get some ready for making mayo.


"There are no mistakes in bread baking, only more bread crumbs"

*Bernard Clayton, Jr.

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Sous vide and then fried chicken.

 

Brined the chicken in some salt water overnight.  Or maybe it was more like 2 days. 

 

All ready to go in the water bath at 147F for a couple of hours.

 

thumbnail_IMG_6048.jpg.cf35b1b932bf14a5c675553dc78813a9.jpg

 

After--some nice broth in there to make gravy out of

 

thumbnail_IMG_6049.jpg.6aaf55c73601aed31c61f31eba0d5f7f.jpg

 

Resting in some buttermilk with a beaten egg

thumbnail_IMG_6050.jpg.cd3f6b0900e779713475384f5627b222.jpg

Then plopped in a bag full of flour seasoned with a bit of garlic, Lawry's salt and lots of black pepper and fried :)

 

thumbnail_IMG_6051.jpg.b69adbe83807021401d07fc99a524b0a.jpg

 

 

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That's fine looking chicken.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Posted (edited)

@Shelby

 

didn't use quarter cup of oil in the bag ?

 

O.o

 

fine looking chicken.  rest the chicken in the butter milk as part of the first step , then ' dry off ? '

 

mighty fine looking fried chicken.


Edited by rotuts (log)
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3 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@Shelby

 

didn't use quarter cup of oil in the bag ?

 

O.o

 

fine looking chicken.  rest the chicken in the butter milk as part of the first step , then ' dry off ? '

 

mighty fine looking fried chicken.

 

No oil in the bag.

 

No, I didn't dry the chicken off after resting in the buttermilk.  Just let it drip for a second and then right into the bag of flour.

 

Thank you :) 

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32 minutes ago, Shelby said:

 

thumbnail_IMG_6051.jpg.b69adbe83807021401d07fc99a524b0a.jpg

 

 

 

That is so gorgeous, I had to quote your photo. :x 

 

At what stage did you make the gravy? While the chicken was resting in the buttermilk? I'd be wanting to eat that chicken the very instant it came out of the pan...

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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1 minute ago, Smithy said:

 

That is so gorgeous, I had to quote your photo. :x 

 

At what stage did you make the gravy? While the chicken was resting in the buttermilk? I'd be wanting to eat that chicken the very instant it came out of the pan...

Awww thank you!

 

Yes, I made the gravy while the chicken was in the buttermilk and then kept it warm while I was frying.

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16 minutes ago, Shelby said:

Awww thank you!

 

Yes, I made the gravy while the chicken was in the buttermilk and then kept it warm while I was frying.

So sorry, but just for clarification: the meat is precooked via SV, then “rested” in buttermilk with beaten egg , then coated in flour and deep fried.

 

The resting period in butter milk/egg served any purpose other than moistening the SV meat ? Is there any classic flavour contribution ? I’d assume that the typical brining function is disabled due to the SV treatment ...

 

Regardless, that’s some damn fine looking fried chicken 🤗

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1 minute ago, Duvel said:

So sorry, but just for clarification: the meat is precooked via SV, then “rested” in buttermilk with beaten egg , then coated in flour and deep fried.

Yes.

 

I like the taste the buttermilk gives the flour breading...and I think it helps it stick better to the chicken, but that could all be in my head ;) 

 

Thank you :) 

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@Shelby I concur - that is some fine looking chicken... did the chicken cool between the SV and buttermilk bath?  How long did it fry for and what was your oil temp?

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1 minute ago, KennethT said:

@Shelby I concur - that is some fine looking chicken... did the chicken cool between the SV and buttermilk bath?  How long did it fry for and what was your oil temp?

Thank you :)

 

Yes, the chicken did cool a bit while I was getting bowls and buttermilk etc. out and arranged.  It wasn't piping hot when it entered the buttermilk/egg bath for sure.

 

The oil temp was around 335F-340F when I put the first round of chicken in...I fried it until the bottom of  the breading on each piece felt firm and crunchy and then flipped it over until it felt the same way again and each piece was that golden color.  It probably took me about 30 mins in total to fry the whole chicken (minus the breasts--I didn't include them).  I found it a bit easier (if you have the time to sous vide the chicken first, that is) to fry it knowing that the meat was already done and I was just going for the perfect golden, crispy outside.

 

I'm quite interested to use this technique on tougher meats such as wild pheasant and rabbit...and maybe even frog legs.

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@Shelby

 

 technique on tougher meats such as wild pheasant and rabbit...and maybe even frog legs. "

 

Ive never eaten wild rabbit I think.   there are lots of small ones in my front yard every morning ..............

 

Im guessing the rabbit Ive eaten in the USA  , that comes from a butcher , is  ' cage raised ?"

 

forget the oil comment , please

 

but I wondered about using buttermilk in the overnight soak.

 

SV ,  pat dry , then dip in fresh buttermilk for the coating series.   
 

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3 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@Shelby

 

 technique on tougher meats such as wild pheasant and rabbit...and maybe even frog legs. "

 

Ive never eaten wild rabbit I think.   there are lots of small ones in my front yard every morning ..............

 

Im guessing the rabbit Ive eaten in the USA  , that comes from a butcher , is  ' cage raised ?"

 

forget the oil comment , please

 

but I wondered about using buttermilk in the overnight soak.

 

SV ,  pat dry , then dip in fresh buttermilk for the coating series.   
 

I would guess the same thing about purchased rabbit, but I'm not sure.  All I do know is that the rabbits that we harvest are pretty tough unless you do a long, slow bake in the oven.  I've fried rabbit and then pressure cooked it, which makes it tender, but, as I've said before on here, the breading isn't crisp.  Which, we like, but I'd like to try this method and see if it works.

 

I'm pretty partial to buttermilk :) 

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@Shelby

 

See, that’s all the questions you get for posting such food porn 😜

 

Please do continue ...

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, rotuts said:

Ive never eaten wild rabbit I think.   there are lots of small ones in my front yard every morning ..............

 

Im guessing the rabbit Ive eaten in the USA  , that comes from a butcher , is  ' cage raised ?"

 

Yes, there are several domesticated varieties bred specifically for meat production.

 

On one of our interminable trips between provinces, my daughter and SIL were chatting about his brother's pet bunny, and another that his cousin owned. The cousin's was a Flemish Giant, at which point I piped up unthinkingly and commented that "Oh, those are one of the best meat breeds!"

The conversation died at that point...

(ETA: Driving between New Brunswick and Nova Scotia is only a few hours, which hardly counts as "interminable" by Canadian standards, but *any* time in the company of my SIL is unequivocably interminable.)


Edited by chromedome (log)
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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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5 minutes ago, chromedome said:

 

 

On one of our interminable trips between provinces, my daughter and SIL were chatting about his brother's pet bunny, and another that his cousin owned. The cousin's was a Flemish Giant, at which point I piped up unthinkingly and commented that "Oh, those are one of the best meat breeds!"

The conversation died at that point

 

 

Yes, I can see that happening.

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the rabbit i bought , at the time

 

came from a high-end meat market in the area I grew up in and retired to visit my fathers

 

we had lived in Europe for several years as my parents taught , and I enjoyed many pain au chocolat

 

Rabbit  was a time to time favorite in the various Bistor's

 

I made it for my father on request on visits :  mustard and dry red wine  

 

I recall   ( 2000 or so ) it was a bit expensive , and when cooked : it was  tender and not that much meat on the carcass

 

way before SV

 

think about it :  Bunny Stock !

 

sorry

 

no matter , my father enjoyed it.

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