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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


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27 minutes ago, teonzo said:

 

If you have a pasta cooker (like this one), then you can put the carrot bag in the pot of the pasta cooker, put the basket of the pasta cooker over the carrot bag, fill with hot water, put your sous-vide machine and launch it. If the basket is not heavy enough, then add a weight over it.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Oh, Teo! I’m sure it would work but it’s not very practical in my case. I have a Joule which I adore because it fits in a very small pot. I am A singleton cooking two carrots at a time I need a practical solution and while everybody is trying to help I still haven’t seen one. and really, really I am not going to try cooking vegetables sous vide again.  The reward is just not worth the trouble. Return on investment and all that.  But thank you anyway. I am not ungrateful for your efforts. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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9 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Oh, Teo! I’m sure it would work but it’s not very practical in my case. I have a Joule which I adore because it fits in a very small pot. I am A singleton cooking two carrots at a time I need a practical solution and while everybody is trying to help I still haven’t seen one. and really, really I am not going to try cooking vegetables sous vide again.  The reward is just not worth the trouble. Return on investment and all that.  But thank you anyway. I am not ungrateful for your efforts. 

 

You just need an Anova Precision Oven.

 

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16 hours ago, Anna N said:

Oh, Teo! I’m sure it would work but it’s not very practical in my case. I have a Joule which I adore because it fits in a very small pot. I am A singleton cooking two carrots at a time I need a practical solution and while everybody is trying to help I still haven’t seen one. and really, really I am not going to try cooking vegetables sous vide again.  The reward is just not worth the trouble. Return on investment and all that.  But thank you anyway. I am not ungrateful for your efforts. 

 

If you have a precision induction unit, like the Paragon or the Control Freak, then you can do this:
- put the carrot bag in a pot;
- lay a lid (a bit smaller than the pot, so it fits in) over the carrot bag, to weight it down;
- pour some water in the pot, just to cover the bag and the lid;
- put the proper lid on the pot, to prevent evaporation;
- set the induction unit to the desired temperature and let it do its job.
If you want to get even more bored than what we are in these days of lockdown, you can countdown the seconds instead of using a timer. This will end up with overcooked carrots.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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Did a large rib eye tonight.  Steak cooked to 120F:

DSCN0774.JPG.3f5c05aa0d16382f29232302ad35fe34.JPG

 

Seared in ghee in an iron skillet:

DSCN0775.JPG.751b88f2e4fdd6aa48d2bb0885f1fa70.JPG

 

Bite:

IMG_1625.thumb.jpg.a2084da4db47fed33b3280bc2e61b15e.jpg

Sorry for the crappy picture.  I didn’t check it until after the steak was all gone.  But even though it’s blurry, you can see the color.  It was fantastic.  Mr. Kim was generous and let me take the rib cap (my favorite).  It was more like prime rib than a steak.  Glorious!

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I have something called a Boneless Blade Eye  Roast.  I have heard of chuck eye which you'd be hard pressed to find around here, but I've never before seen or heard of this cut.  I want to cook it sous vide @134F.  Do I cook it as I would a regular blade roast for 48 hours?  It weighs 3 pounds.  Thank you.

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is is very interesting   I wonder what the cut actually is 

 

would you be able to post a few views ?

 

the Blade should be two muscles under the animals scapula  

 

the bone you see in a " 7 " bone  slab of meat.

 

7-bone-steak.jpg.46ccbc2f0afec7df7b19143dbb2a9bdf.jpg

 

not the best pic ,   the meat here , center :

 

777.jpg.dfbbf89b3b247fa4299cc5e1ba7de83a.jpg

 

shows a thick tendon between two long muscles   that tendon is very very tough 

 

the meat , if you could remove the tendon , and tie back together is tender and very tasty.

 

its as tasty as tasty gets.  a common way to cut this out  , ' blade roast '

 

is to cut the roast into slabs , cook quickly as you might a steak , then remove the central tendon

 

before serving .    Blade Steaks cut this way are the commonest way this cut is sold.

 

back to SV    is you did 48 hours , the meat itself might suffer , and the tendon wont be very tender.

 

if you want SV , remove the tendon , reassemble the two muscles  and tie w string

 

figure out your ' done-ness temp )   rare , ed etc   then SV at that temp for 4 - 6 hrs Id say.

 

please post your results.   you can avoid thing the meat back together , and SV the pieces individually

 

they come out as little steaks , but w the grain running horizontally , not vertically 

 

4 hours would work as they will be thinner.      a very tasty cut of beef !

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@ElsieD 

 

thank you for your pic

 

its difficult to see what it is , unless it 

 

un vac's and mor pic of the unrolling 

 

the few times in my  areamIve seen 

 

Blade Roasts 

 

Ive jumped on them 

 

as I under standby that meat.

 

I cant tell you what this is

 

but Id way this :

 

if you chose to SV 

 

why not cut this in thirds 

 

and have three packs ?

 

if you see an Outstanding bit of Olympic grizzle 

 

just trim that off 

 

looks very delicious to me

 

that pack

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I put my roast in it's water bath the other night.  When I got up in the morning it was floating like a raft in a pool.  So I had to toss it.😕

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25 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

Question: has anyone tried the Splendid Table (ATK) method of poaching eggs?  It looked wonderful on the TV show, but I haven't attempted yet and was wondering if anyone had any experience with it.  

 

I do it frequently for ramen eggs. Chefsteps developed the recipe before ATK, and they go a minute longer (which is recommended).

 

 

You can get a sense for the relative texture in this video from Anova. The yolk is similar to a 63c egg but with less loose egg white (at least at 13 minutes).

 

 

 

 

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34 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

I put my roast in it's water bath the other night.  When I got up in the morning it was floating like a raft in a pool.  So I had to toss it.😕

Another question related to this.  When I cooked my latest steak sous vide, I noticed that the bag was not tight to the steak like when I had sucked it (family nickname for vacuum).  It didn't occur to me that I shouldn't go ahead, so I did, weighting it down with a heavy bowl.  Have I screwed my Anova?  Did I circulate beef juice all through it?  

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40 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

Another question related to this.  When I cooked my latest steak sous vide, I noticed that the bag was not tight to the steak like when I had sucked it (family nickname for vacuum).  It didn't occur to me that I shouldn't go ahead, so I did, weighting it down with a heavy bowl.  Have I screwed my Anova?  Did I circulate beef juice all through it?  

 

As long as the bag was sealed it should be fine.  Dave Arnold advocates not pulling a hard vacuum for steaks because he found it was a detriment to flavor.  If your bag was leaking beef juice you certainly should smell it.

 

 

Edit:  unless of course you are infected.

 

 

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)
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14 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

As long as the bag was sealed it should be fine.  Dave Arnold advocates not pulling a hard vacuum for steaks because he found it was a detriment to flavor.  If your bag was leaking beef juice you certainly should smell it.

 

 

Edit:  unless of course you are infected.

 

 

 

I did give it a bit of a squeeze before sinking it in the water and couldn't detect any air escaping.  Also, the water looks clear.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

I don't know how to search for exactly what I'm looking for, so . . .

Our university has agriculture programs which means they also raise livestock and sell meat; it's one of the few reliable ways to get lamb in the area. Due to Covid-19, the meat market has been closed. They've been scrambling for what to do. A few days ago there was a notice that the market would now only sell certain prepackaged, frozen items via an online form. I missed ordering but that didn't matter, the online form crashed. Yesterday I got an email saying the form would re-open at 5:30 p.m. for 100 orders. At 5:29 the form was still closed. Later, I got another notice that they had exceeded their order limit by 70 orders (i.e. 170) in just 4 minutes!

 

Fortunately, I was one lucky person. One of the things I ended up with was 4.37 lbs frozen pork loin back ribs which is two huge ribs (over 20"). They will need to be defrosted to cut them.

 

Now, I remember reading that other eG folks sous vide pork ribs, then freeze them until they're ready to finish them in the oven. Do I remember that right? Possibly @JoNorvelleWalker or @Kim Shook or @Shelby?

 

Time and temp please. And what do you do to finish them?

 

 

P.S. I currently have 5.5 lbs lamb leg in the sv until Mon eve!

 

 

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7 minutes ago, TdeV said:

I don't know how to search for exactly what I'm looking for, so . . .

Our university has agriculture programs which means they also raise livestock and sell meat; it's one of the few reliable ways to get lamb in the area. Due to Covid-19, the meat market has been closed. They've been scrambling for what to do. A few days ago there was a notice that the market would now only sell certain prepackaged, frozen items via an online form. I missed ordering but that didn't matter, the online form crashed. Yesterday I got an email saying the form would re-open at 5:30 p.m. for 100 orders. At 5:29 the form was still closed. Later, I got another notice that they had exceeded their order limit by 70 orders (i.e. 170) in just 4 minutes!

 

Fortunately, I was one lucky person. One of the things I ended up with was 4.37 lbs frozen pork loin back ribs which is two huge ribs (over 20"). They will need to be defrosted to cut them.

 

Now, I remember reading that other eG folks sous vide pork ribs, then freeze them until they're ready to finish them in the oven. Do I remember that right? Possibly @JoNorvelleWalker or @Kim Shook or @Shelby?

 

Time and temp please. And what do you do to finish them?

 

 

P.S. I currently have 5.5 lbs lamb leg in the sv until Mon eve!

 

 

 

I pasteurize ribs and other meat sous vide and store in the refrigerator.  You could freeze I suppose if you would rather.  For pasteurizing I use Baldwin's temperature and time tables.

 

For ribs I like to finish on the Philips grill.

 

 

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12 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

For ribs I like to finish on the Philips grill.

 

Ah, yet another device which I don't own. You are a very, very bad influence, Jo.

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I have SV'd for 36 hours at 140 then finished on the grill, in the smoker or in the oven. SV with dry rub, finish with bbq sauce.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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I looked back in my SV notebook.  We cold smoked pork ribs for a few hours and then I SV'd them at 170F for 4 hours and then reduced the temp to 160F for 1 hour so a total of 5 hours.  I must have liked them because I don't write things down in my book if they fail.  I'm sure I probably basted them with BBQ sauce and broiled them in the oven to finish.  So, I don't see why you couldn't freeze them before that step.

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I ordered some one inch rib pork chops from our favourite butcher/sausage maker.  Into the bath they went at 132F for 2 hours...I've done some from another 'organic' butcher last week and this treatment resulted in really tender and juicy meat.  Not this time with these pork chops...like shoe leather.  They were juicy but I had to slice them super thin on the plate just so I could masticate them into a bolus that could be swallowed.😟

 

Lesson learned:  a perfect method with a crappy piece of meat ends badly.  Thing is, I've had really good meat from them before.  I will call, they will appreciate the feedback. 

 

Hoping for the best:  I have some of their really nice looking beef short ribs in the bath at 144F for 48 hours (our preferred treatment).  We've had great success with their ribs before.  Fingers Crossed.....toes too, truth be told.

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Yes, most pork of the better cuts of pork is very lean and its the fats & connective tissues in those lesser cuts that benefit from SV process.

I am trying different temps and times but its an ongoing battle. I have tried brine to increase its moisture content so it doesn't lose too much moisture during long high temperature SV. It does work to some extent but not as well as I would expect.

The best method so far has been to SV at 62C for 45min in BBQ sauce and finish in the oven 30~45 mins at 140C or so. This thickens the sauce and combines any juices from the SV process.

Any longer and the meat dries out too much. Still a work in progress. I have tried slow fry and flash fry and although the outside looks and tastes as expected, I can't get the tenderness or texture I want.

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For me, 62C is too high.  The 132F is a temperature we like...still slightly pink and usually juicy.  I have two more package of these chops so next I think I will try to tenderize them by cooking longer.  So I will try 8 hours at 132F to see if that works.

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