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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


FrogPrincesse
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1 hour ago, Shelby said:

I've just started reading through this thread on sous vide eggs and it seems very useful.

You owe me two hours. Just saying.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Two sous vide projects are littering my countertops lately.  First one is two 3 lb Jimmy Dean sausage chubs.   I froze them, removed the original wrapping, vac packed them, cooked them at 147F for 24 hours.  Chilled them down, sliced them and seared them in my panini press at highest heat.  The seasoning are much, much more intense.  We are a sausage patty household.  Most of the fat is rendered in the bag so it's all meat, baby.  I'll end up parceling these and refreezing.  Then they good to go for future use.   I think the idea for sous vide JD sausage originated on the Chefsteps community board or here with @btbyrd for inspiration.

 

The other is creme fraiche, culture bought from cheesemaking.com.  Holding at 72F until I get the tang I desire.

IMG_9016.jpg

IMG_9017.jpg

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Made hard-boiled eggs sous vide yesterday and enjoyed a couple of them in an egg salad which I put on top of a piece of naan for breakfast this morning. I can’t remember which member it was but someone used a mesh bag to hold the eggs. I stole this idea and it works very well. I was able to lower them into the sous vide bath, lift them out easily, and finally lower them into an ice bath. A very convenient way of dealing with eggs sous vide. The only downside, and it didn’t really matter for egg salad, was that the yolks were not centered. I think the agitation of the loose eggs makes this less likely.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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for SV eggs

 

@Anna N 

 

I use the stainless Steel  ' bucket ' I use

 

fir pressure steaming in the iPot

 

of course , it has to fit in your SV system

 

mine does.   lift out , place in a bowl s cold water 

 

lift up and down a bit , change the cold water

 

done when cold.

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@lemniscate 

 

Ive been SV'ing  Sausage in Rolls for a while

 

I prefer Jones to JD's

 

I think there is less fat.

 

then I chill and freeze in the original package , still in the SV bag.

 

I get a few of these when they go on sale

 

and SV away.

 

I thaw and brown or use in stuffing etc

 

easy to do , and economical.

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Jimmy Dean is a common supermarket brand.  I am not familiar with Jones, may be only East Coast.  I grew up on Bob Evans brand but I haven't seen that in the Western States.  Seasoning is SALT, sage, black pepper forward, might be other seasonings but not in the forefront:

 

Pork, Water, Contains 2% Or Less Of The Following: Corn Syrup, Salt, Spices, Sugar, Monosodium Glutamate, Flavorings.

 

 

@rotuts, do you have to thaw the whole SV-ed roll to cut into patties? 

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I used to take the SV package from the freezer

 

and place in the refrig over night

 

if not , I could cut the fz w a bread knife from fz and make patties

 

browsing on high heat until just browned would that them out to eating temp.

 

id mostly cut the cooked sausage into chunks and used in stuffing

 

cooked sausage was not as slippery as the uncooked.

 

i tried to look up the fat difference , as i do recall JD was much fattier

 

but hard to do ;  JD lists the fat content , as far as i can tell from the internet and its packages

 

as ' cooked meat '

 

no matter

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7 hours ago, Anna N said:

Made hard-boiled eggs sous vide yesterday and enjoyed a couple of them in an egg salad which I put on top of a piece of naan for breakfast this morning. I can’t remember which member it was but someone used a mesh bag to hold the eggs. I stole this idea and it works very well. I was able to lower them into the sous vide bath, lift them out easily, and finally lower them into an ice bath. A very convenient way of dealing with eggs sous vide. The only downside, and it didn’t really matter for egg salad, was that the yolks were not centered. I think the agitation of the loose eggs makes this less likely.

 

I use a foodpod:

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/112354-whats-new-in-kitchen-gadgets/?do=findComment&comment=1956409

 

First I put each egg in a plastic sandwich bag and tie the open end of the bag in a knot.  That way if worse comes to worst and the shell breaks, there is no containment issue.  Cleaning scrambled eggs from my anova is not something I look forward to.

 

 

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31 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I use a foodpod:

Thanks. Given the limited room I have in my kitchen, the mesh bag scrunches up into something no bigger than an egg. Truth be told, when I am not using it to sous vide eggs it holds my onions in suspension. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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9 hours ago, lemniscate said:

Two sous vide projects are littering my countertops lately.  First one is two 3 lb Jimmy Dean sausage chubs.   I froze them, removed the original wrapping, vac packed them, cooked them at 147F for 24 hours.  Chilled them down, sliced them and seared them in my panini press at highest heat.  The seasoning are much, much more intense.  We are a sausage patty household.  Most of the fat is rendered in the bag so it's all meat, baby.  I'll end up parceling these and refreezing.  Then they good to go for future use.   I think the idea for sous vide JD sausage originated on the Chefsteps community board or here with @btbyrd for inspiration.

 

The other is creme fraiche, culture bought from cheesemaking.com.  Holding at 72F until I get the tang I desire.

IMG_9016.jpg

 

 

 

M'mm m'mm. Sausage and biscuit time. When my girls were home -- specifically Child C and her buddy who lived with us for a while -- I used to fry up two pounds of sausage, make a big batch of biscuits, make up sausage and biscuits, wrap individually and freeze. They could grab one and microwave for breakfast, or take with them to work and microwave for breakfast.

 

The best sausage and biscuits, of course, are gleaned from beneath the heat lamp in a convenience store case somewhere along a highway in the rural South. There will be complimenary jam/jelly OR mustard (I never understood mustard on sausage biscuits), plastic knives to spread it, and a gracious plenty of napkins. That, with a bottle of OJ and a big cup of coffee, has made many a road-trip breakfast for me.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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4 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Thanks. Given the limited room I have in my kitchen, the mesh bag scrunches up into something no bigger than an egg. Truth be told, when I am not using it to sous vide eggs it holds my onions in suspension. 

 

My foodpod doesn't live in the kitchen either.  But seriously I do recommend you consider plastic sandwich bags for sous vide eggs.

 

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4 minutes ago, kayb said:

make a big batch of biscuits

That's next, maybe tomorrow.  I have always been biscuit-challenged.  I don't know why, because I can whip up a shortening crust with no issues, but my biscuits always disappointed me.  Could be I grew up in the North, far away from White LIly.

 

I am happy to say I discovered cream biscuits and baking life has changed, I can make biscuits I like and they are pretty foolproof.

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13 minutes ago, lemniscate said:

That's next, maybe tomorrow.  I have always been biscuit-challenged.  I don't know why, because I can whip up a shortening crust with no issues, but my biscuits always disappointed me.  Could be I grew up in the North, far away from White LIly.

 

I am happy to say I discovered cream biscuits and baking life has changed, I can make biscuits I like and they are pretty foolproof.

 

Hint: Go to the supermarket. Get you a bag of frozen biscuits. No appreciable quality difference from what I can make.

 

Of course, there are much better biscuits out there than what I can make. The folks at Bryant's Breakfast in Memphis, for example, I am quite certain have sold their sold to Satan in exchange for the ability to make the best biscuits ever.


Bryant's Breakfast

 

Don't go on the weekend. The line is centuries long.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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  • 1 month later...

I agree with @kayb.  I gave up shaming myself for frozen biscuits a long time ago.  I know that many people (including one of my grandmothers) can whip together a pan full of biscuits in one bowl in 5 minutes.  It takes me forever, I end up with flour from one end of the kitchen to the other and they are never as fluffy and flaky and tender as the damn frozen ones.  

 

A little advice.  I've done some research on old posts and I think I've decided to do something.  I'm making our Christmas dinner on Saturday (don't ask 🙄).  Because I like to get as much done ahead of time as possible, I plan on roasting and carving the turkey on Friday.  I'll put portions in vacuum bags and sous vide enough for four of us on Saturday to serve.  So here are my questions:

 

     1. Does this make sense or should I reheat another way?

 

     2. Should I put all the turkey that I think we'll eat on Saturday (probably half - a leg, a thigh, and half the breast, sliced) in one bag or should I break it up?

 

     3. What temperature and how long?

 

Thanks in advance!

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@Kim Shook, I'm wondering, if you're not going to eat the whole roasted turkey, why you don't cut up the raw turkey, vacuum-seal, sous vide, chill or freeze, and then reheat sous vide? Seems more reliable to me. (I think that roasted meat gets really dry).

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2 Venison osso buco, 24 hours 175 F ala Chefsteps.   Should be done around 5pm today.  I am also using a reduced beer/demiglace as the flavoring in the bags.   The venison was bought during one of D'Artagnan's flash sales a few months back.

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12 minutes ago, TdeV said:

@Kim Shook, I'm wondering, if you're not going to eat the whole roasted turkey, why you don't cut up the raw turkey, vacuum-seal, sous vide, chill or freeze, and then reheat sous vide? Seems more reliable to me. (I think that roasted meat gets really dry).

The only thing is is that the turkey is frozen.  Can I successfully refreeze the half turkey once I thaw it.  And how hard will it be to cut a raw, 11 lb. turkey in half?  I have extremely weak, arthritic hands.

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Why are you cutting it in half? Just take the legs and breasts off and use the rest to make stock. This is the easiest (and one of the most delicious) ways to cook turkey. I've done it for the past three or four Thanksgivings. I tend to go a little higher in temp on the breasts (136F-ish) but everything else is spot on.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, btbyrd said:

Why are you cutting it in half? Just take the legs and breasts off and use the rest to make stock. This is the easiest (and one of the most delicious) ways to cook turkey. I've done it for the past three or four Thanksgivings. I tend to go a little higher in temp on the breasts (136F-ish) but everything else is spot on.

 

 

Yes.  That makes sense. Thank you!

 

 

Edited by Kim Shook (log)
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On 1/25/2020 at 2:07 PM, MetsFan5 said:

Ok I’m going to give this a go. I just got a 1.28lb whole irl tenderloin from Wegmans that has seasoning on it. 
 

how do I figure out the time and temp? I have an Anova. I prefer my pork medium well and want to sear it in a hot pan after taking it out of the SV bath then serve. Does that seem like a reasonable plan? 
 

(running off to actually take the Anova out of its box!)

You'll get more impressive results from using a pork loin.  super juicy and ⁰tender

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23 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

I agree with @kayb.  I gave up shaming myself for frozen biscuits a long time ago.  I know that many people (including one of my grandmothers) can whip together a pan full of biscuits in one bowl in 5 minutes.  It takes me forever, I end up with flour from one end of the kitchen to the other and they are never as fluffy and flaky and tender as the damn frozen ones.  

 

A little advice.  I've done some research on old posts and I think I've decided to do something.  I'm making our Christmas dinner on Saturday (don't ask 🙄).  Because I like to get as much done ahead of time as possible, I plan on roasting and carving the turkey on Friday.  I'll put portions in vacuum bags and sous vide enough for four of us on Saturday to serve.  So here are my questions:

 

     1. Does this make sense or should I reheat another way?

 

     2. Should I put all the turkey that I think we'll eat on Saturday (probably half - a leg, a thigh, and half the breast, sliced) in one bag or should I break it up?

 

     3. What temperature and how long?

 

Thanks in advance!

I'd cook it sv without roasting. Breast will be juicy at 140f for 3 hrs

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