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andiesenji

society donor
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    http://www.asenjigalblogs.com/

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    Southern California

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  1. If you put the refillable pod in properly and it is sealed correctly, there should be no residue in your cup. The hole for the needle seals tightly around it. If it is perforated in the wrong place the plastic will not seal around the needle, fine coffee grounds can wash out. I use super fine espresso grind with no residue at all coming through. Here are photos of a pod showing the sealing gasket. It should not be visible anywhere when properly sealed the water is pushed through with a lot of pressure. Once completely sealed, the tab next to the input hole should be lined up with the marker in the pod carrier. If the needle perforates the pod anywhere else, then there is a second hole and grounds will be forced out through the first one.
  2. Mine comes out so hot I have to cool it down before I can drink it. If you use dark roast coffee, you will have no problem with strength if you fill the pods the way I described.
  3. andiesenji

    Pasteurizing Eggs Sous Vide

    Since 1960, the date of that study, new strains of Salmonella have been isolated. In particular the Newport strain in 2003 and which was the culprit in a salmonella outbreak from cantaloupes where chicken manure had been used by a large grower. This strain is resistant to antibiotics and can affect animals as well as humans. Long after I stopped catering, I continued to get the bulletins from the L.A. County Health Dept. and there was info from the Journal of Microbiology in one. I know there are several variants of the Newport strain, they mutate the same as every other bacterium and virus.
  4. andiesenji

    Pasteurizing Eggs Sous Vide

    I give up. heating to 130 is not Pasteurizing. Even Baldwin in his Sous Vide for the Home Cook says to heat to 135° for at least an hour and 15 minutes.
  5. andiesenji

    Pasteurizing Eggs Sous Vide

    I was hospitalized for Salmonella in 1977, for 9 days. It was traced to a Caesar salad at an upscale restaurant that prepared the salad at table side. 2 others in my party also were sickened, one hospitalized. We learned later that at least one other patron became ill but no details. The restaurant paid all the medical bills and settled without a law suit. It was not fun and at one point I thought I was going to die because my kidneys began to fail. I take it seriously. This year alone, a quarter of a BILLION eggs have been recalled for salmonella. I have made large batches of Hollandaise with pasteurized eggs, JUST AS THE COMMERCIAL HOLLANDAISE IS MADE, and many other sauces that use raw eggs. My mayonnaise has been praised by people who know foods. When they were available at a local supermarket, I bought Davidson's Safest Choice Eggs, which are pasteurized. More expensive but less work for me. The following is from an article in one of the trade publications for food producers, distributors and end point sales. "Even if investigators have indeed found the salmonella source, you may wonder, how can the bacteria get inside the hard shell of an egg? Let us count the ways.One route is through the insides of a chicken, said Kevin Keener, a food process engineer at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind. On average, he said, one out of every 20,000 chicken eggs contains a small amount of salmonella that is deposited into the sac by the hen.Chickens get doses of salmonella bacteria (of which there are 2,300 kinds) from their environment, which is easily contaminated by rodents, birds and flies. These carriers deliver the bacteria to all types of farms -- regardless of whether they're conventional, organic or free-range.Once the bacteria get in the chicken, the microorganisms thrive under ideal conditions, with internal temperatures of about 102 degrees Fahrenheit. Yet chickens harbor salmonella without any signs of illness, making it impossible to know which animals are infected."Literally," Keener said, "it's a needle in a haystack."Those few contaminated eggs that come out of a hen usually contain a very low levels of bacteria, Keener said, totaling between two and five microorganisms. It takes a level of at least 100 bacteria to make a person sick.But multiplication happens fast if the eggs aren't cooled quickly. And if there's a lapse in cleaning practices or an undetected outbreak among the chickens, the percentage of infected animals -- and tainted eggs -- can also increase rapidly."Salmonella doubles every 20 minutes under ideal conditions," Keener said. "When sitting there for an hour, two could become 32. At two hours, there would be 1,000 organisms. At eight hours, it would be in the range of millions. In one egg. "Rapid chilling to 45 degrees: Keener's group is working on a rapid-cooling technique that uses liquid carbon dioxide to bring eggs down to 45 degrees F within five minutes. At that temperature, salmonella can't multiply. stops growth but does not guarantee that growth will resume once eggs are in the "danger zone" 49°F to 139°F.Salmonella tends to pool in the membrane around an egg's yolk, Keener added. So if you have a sunny-side-up habit, you should probably give it up. For now, consumers can protect themselves by checking for broken eggs before buying cartons at the store, refrigerating eggs promptly and cooking eggs well. For vulnerable groups, such as the very young, the very old those with immune problems, pasteurized eggs are best."
  6. Mine is the EXPERTA
  7. I am still happy with it and I haven't bought any pods for over a year. I bought some of the refillable capsules on Amazon a couple of times. - They do wear out after many months of constant use but they are cheap. I usually fill 2 or 3 at a time but sometimes just one if I am trying out a new coffee. I grind the beans to not too fine, a couple of clicks below the Fine/Medium division. With dark roast coffees, and I use creamer I set it to dispense to the 10 ounce line on a measure. I do this once in the measure and then directly into my mug. I lightly tamp the grounds into the capsule with the bottom of the little measure that comes with these capsules, and fill to about 1/8 inch below the line where the little gasket is. These have a hole for the "needle" so you do have to line it up with the little "marker" on the handle side of the capsule holder. If you do get this machine and the capsules, I will take photos so you can see exactly what I mean.
  8. andiesenji

    Pasteurizing Eggs Sous Vide

    I haven't read through this entire thread because some seem repetitive. I have an electric pasteurizer that I used for batches of 3 to 5 dozen eggs when I was catering because of requests for salad dressings made with raw eggs, French style (soft) omelets, etc. And for requests for eggnog for holiday parties. Now I do smaller batches, usually a dozen at a time, Large, for mayonnaise, other sauces, salad dressings, etc. Large eggs at room temperature are placed in room temp water and bring it to at least 140°F and no more than 143°F and once it reaches this temp (i use a high-low alarm thermometer for small batches the pasteurized is automatic) set the timer for 4 minutes which gives you a full minute to remove the eggs from the water. I "sacrifice" one egg with a probe thermometer inserted into the yolk to make sure it reaches the CRITICAL TEMPERATURE of 138° F. Any temp below this will not only not kill the salmonella but will promote growth. According to the California Egg Board. Immediately rinse the eggs in cool water, dry the surface thoroughly and refrigerate. They should be used within 10 days. Holding them at 130°F for long periods - if the YOLKS NEVER REACH 138° is potentially promoting growth of salmonella. I bought the pasteurizer in 1979 when I began my adventure into cheesemaking. I could buy "certified" raw milk at the local dairy outlet, and would pasteurize it myself before making my cheeses. When I began the catering, the Health Department gave me stacks of bulletins, one of which involved EGGS. And the LIABILITY of using raw eggs. I spoke to one of the inspectors who checked my kitchen and showed him the pasteurizer and he said that would be perfectly adequate for pasteurizing eggs as the settings for liquid dairy products and for eggs were virtually identical. I have been pasteurizing eggs on a regular basis since 1982 and I have never had a problem.
  9. andiesenji

    Durable Food Processor

    I bought an extra blade a couple of years after I bought my DLC-7 and several years ago the original blade bent at the tip, but did not break, when it encountered a nectarine pit. I carefully discarded that one and replaced it with the "new" one.
  10. andiesenji

    Durable Food Processor

    I had a Cuisinart 11 cup from the mid-1980s until three years ago when I gave it to a neighbor who desperately needed one. I also "had" a 14 cup Cuisinart that I bought in 1998 as a backup for my 20 cup and it was still working nicely until a month ago when it suffered a fatal accident. I had used it, rinsed the parts and put them in the dishwasher, grabbed a dishtowel from the counter, which was unfortunately hiding the cord and I yanked it off the counter and it did not survived the impact with the floor. In fact, I just listed all the perfectly fine parts, all Made in Japan, not China! on ebay yesterday. There are several on ebay, for very reasonable prices. This is a workhorse of the line - as long as you get the "vintage" ones made before 2002. I highly recommend it. Look for a listing: DLC-7 Cuisinart or DLC SERIES 7 CUISINART. 14 cup. Mine has an extra lid - the flat lid used for dough, or anything that did not need feeding, although it does have center access for adding liquids or whatever to doughs, I used it a lot for making crumb pie crusts. I still have my big 20 cup and will be more careful with it, but it is much too heavy to move the way it's little brother did. Here's one with a lot of extras: eBay item number:152949213228 And one with some extras: eBay item number:253762141945 Here's the lineup of my three machines around 2005.
  11. andiesenji

    Rare Cookbook now on Ebay

    This happened a couple of years ago. Back in the late 1970s a man who had purchased a rare book of Audubon Birds, was run off the road, beaten and the book stolen. It never surfaced again, At the time it was surmised that the hit on the man had been ordered by a collector who wanted it for his private collection. The 1980s were notable for the sheer volume of book thefts, like the Stephen Blumberg affair and that of James Richard Shinn, both of whom stole hundreds of thousands of rare books from libraries. I worked part time for a specialty book dealer in rare books from the mid 1970s to 1992 when she sold the business. She gave me her copies of Antiquarian Booksellers Association bulletins, which had fascinating reading about book thieves and also very comprehensive lists of book auctions and sales.
  12. andiesenji

    Rare Cookbook now on Ebay

    You have no idea how fanatic book collectors can be. Years ago when I was actively collecting, I went to many auctions held by antiquarian booksellers. I have seen seemingly normal people practically come to blows. I saw one very elegantly dressed and very wealthy woman scream at another woman who upped a bid by a considerable amount - she really wanted that book. This book was an amazing find because it was already much more expensive than I paid. But just as the "buyer beware" adage is important, so is the "dealer, know the worth of your stock!"
  13. andiesenji

    Rare Cookbook now on Ebay

    It is ALL about the dust jacket. A signed first edition of The Sun Also Rises, no dust jacket sells for about $350.00 in very fine condition. A signed first edition of The Sun Also Rises with original dust jacket, $5,500.00 A copy of Early California Hospitality with a partial dust jacket, not near as complete as mine, sold for 695.95 and the boards were stained, some creasing of pages.
  14. andiesenji

    Rare Cookbook now on Ebay

    The link is only to my page with the book.
  15. I posted about this rare cookbook some time ago. Now I have listed it on Ebay so if anyone knows a collector, please pass the information along. I considered listing it on Amazon but found there were too many hoops to jump through, so am sticking with Ebay. Only 1019 of these were printed in 1938. There are a few offered by booksellers but none have the very fragile dust jacket. This does and the antiquarian book people I contacted told me that in many cases a dust jacket, even damaged, can be worth 10 or 15 times the worth of the book itself. Early California Hospitality
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