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Cooking with "Chocolates and Confections" by Peter Greweling (Part 1)

Confections Chocolate Cookbook

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#541 tammylc

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 08:20 AM

Looks good! Nice thin shells, and no air bubbles - great work.

You should get at least 3 weeks at room temperature from that recipe, it keeps quite well. It's my go-to white chocolate citrus recipe - I've never made it as written, but I made a lemon-rosemary variation that was good, and it's really amazing with lime juice.

And yes, having enough molds is key to making the work flow well with molding.

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#542 John DePaula

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 08:40 AM

Yeah, those look beautiful Emma. You might consider the following workflow:
  • Day 1: Make shells
  • Day 2: Make ganaches and fill shells
  • Day 3: Back off the filled shells
Of course, you could do all of these steps in one day but it would be a LONG day...

I'm eager to try that recipe with lime juice...
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#543 tammylc

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 08:45 AM

I'm eager to try that recipe with lime juice...

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It's amazing. I didn't use the mint for it, just lime, and it's been one of my most popular flavors. But mint would be good too - add some rum and you'd have a white chocolate mojito...

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#544 emmalish

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 09:16 AM

Yeah, those look beautiful Emma.  You might consider the following workflow:

  • Day 1:  Make shells
  • Day 2:  Make ganaches and fill shells
  • Day 3:  Back off the filled shells
Of course, you could do all of these steps in one day but it would be a LONG day...

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Of course, I had to do it all in one day. :rolleyes: I made the ganache, and while that was cooling to room temp, I tempered the chocolate and made the shells. then filled the molds and backed them off with piped chocolate.

I'm working with a microwave to temper my chocolate and still quite new to tempering. It's probably not as big a deal as I think it is, but I don't want to do it multiple times for a single recipe.

Even with lemon rather than lime, it makes me think "mojito" too. A place near me makes a lemon/basil truffle – it's a really nice combination. I'd like to try to recreate that one.

Looks good! Nice thin shells, and no air bubbles - great work.

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Thanks Tammy! I have to say, it was very satisfying to see all the bubbles rising to the surface as I banged my molds against the countertop!

Edited by emmalish, 28 April 2008 - 09:20 AM.

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?


#545 tammylc

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 10:23 AM

Yeah, those look beautiful Emma.  You might consider the following workflow:

  • Day 1:  Make shells

  • Day 2:  Make ganaches and fill shells

  • Day 3:  Back off the filled shells
Of course, you could do all of these steps in one day but it would be a LONG day...

View Post

Of course, I had to do it all in one day. :rolleyes: I made the ganache, and while that was cooling to room temp, I tempered the chocolate and made the shells. then filled the molds and backed them off with piped chocolate.

I'm working with a microwave to temper my chocolate and still quite new to tempering. It's probably not as big a deal as I think it is, but I don't want to do it multiple times for a single recipe.


The "sinking" problem you describe with the backs may well be because you didn't let your ganache set up enough before backing off. Just an FYI.

I used to use a two day process - make shells, fill molds, let set overnight, then back off the next morning. Now I'm more likely to do it all in one day for smallish quantities, but I still try to let my ganache set up for at least an hour before I back off.

Tempering is a PITA, it's true. But the best way to get more comfortable with it is just to do it over and over...

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#546 emmalish

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 10:40 AM

The "sinking" problem you describe with the backs may well be because you didn't let your ganache set up enough before backing off.  Just an FYI.

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I was thinking that too. Thanks for confirming. Next time I'll make it a two-day process (sigh).

I also made the buttercrunch toffee recipe this weekend. I've been making David Lebovitz's buttercrunch recipe since I discovered it. Peter Greweling's is completely different. While David's is stirred as little as possible and includes baking soda, Peter's is stirred constantly and has no baking soda. I think I like the flavour of Peter's better, but the texture of David's. Must do a little experimenting...

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?


#547 Lior

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 10:41 AM

Emma! They look amazing! Iwill also try them now!

#548 tammylc

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 10:47 AM

The "sinking" problem you describe with the backs may well be because you didn't let your ganache set up enough before backing off.  Just an FYI.

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I was thinking that too. Thanks for confirming. Next time I'll make it a two-day process (sigh).


You don't even necessarily need to do two days, especially since you've only got two molds. That ganache sets up pretty quickly. Just give it an hour or two before backing off.

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Dinner for 40


#549 emmalish

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 10:50 AM

You don't even necessarily need to do two days, especially since you've only got two molds.

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I've got two more on the way from Chocolat-Chocolat. :rolleyes:

And one of them is magnetic, so I can play with my transfer sheets too!

edited to add I had a package waiting for me when I got home. Woo! And I lied – I'd ordered three molds. Totally forgot about one of them.

This weekend I'm going to make Kerry's caramels again. Maybe the following weekend I'll try the Chai Tigers in the molds.

Edited by emmalish, 28 April 2008 - 07:40 PM.

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?


#550 gnuf

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 06:24 AM

I thought I'd post pictures of some of the chocolates I've made recently from the book. I've been following with keen interest Chris Hennes' work, especially since he started just last year and has exhibited a lot of skill. Tempering and dipping are problem areas for me, but I do feel I'm improving. Many of the tips in this topic have been very helpful.

All of the slabbed ganaches were made in an 8" square pan lined with either plastic wrap or parchment. I have yet to find a place to buy the metal rods to make my own ganache frames. As a result the pieces are thicker than they should be, since a half recipe needs 72 square inches.

There are more notes on my blog, but I'll just put a few words about each here:

Posted Image
Apricot - This butter ganache was very, very soft and didn't set up properly. I also had trouble with tempering the milk chocolate for dipping, and with the too-small size of the squares (they kept falling off the fork!).

Posted Image
Sesame Hexagons - I used a hexagonal ganache cutter to make these. My first time dipping a piece just up to the top, a technique I hadn't used before, but I am pleased with the cup-like effect it gives.

Posted Image
Pear - This was very soft to work with. As mentioned in a previous comment, the flavour is quite subtle.

Posted Image
Hazelnut Gianduja - I made a batch of the gianduja recipe and filled chocolate shells with it. I made the mistake of letting the milk chocolate accents set before filling with the dark chocolate, so there's a lot of crystallization, which mars the marbling effect.

Posted Image
Habanos - This has been my most successful piece from this book so far. Both ganaches set up nicely, although the mango layer took a bit longer than I expected. This may have been due to excess water content (I cut the reducing time short).

#551 Lior

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 06:35 AM

liqueur cordials!!
I made the liqueur filled truffle shells using valrhona truffle balls and filled with the liqueur-syrup recipe on page 253. I note that Greweling heats the syrup up to 119C whereas most other places say to heat to 108C. Then at the bottom he has a NOTE that says something about sweetened and unsweetened spirits. I only noticed this after amking the truffles, which turned out fine. Does he mean to heat up the liqueur to 117C?? Anyone know?

#552 lapin d'or

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 08:59 AM

Lior, I think he is saying to heat the syrup up to 119 if you are then adding an unsweetened spirit but only 117 if it is sweetened. I guess the lower temp for the sweet spirit version results in the final sugar percentage by volume being the same as the unsweetend version?

#553 Chris Hennes

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 09:36 AM

Posted Image
Habanos - This has been my most successful piece from this book so far. Both ganaches set up nicely, although the mango layer took a bit longer than I expected. This may have been due to excess water content (I cut the reducing time short).

View Post

Those habanos look great, I love the transfer sheet you used. Did yours wind up spicy at all? I really need to make them again to see if I can add a little kick, I just haven't had time to do any confectionary work this summer :sad: .

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#554 Lior

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 09:37 AM

I think so too. Then I noticed that in the ingredients he writes
"liquor or spirit, warm"
Sometimes his directions are not perfect!
Thanks :smile:

#555 Tiny

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Posted 27 May 2008 - 08:02 PM

I started Chef Greweling's chocolate and confections class at the CIA today....will post pictures from the class as we finish product.

#556 John DePaula

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Posted 27 May 2008 - 08:38 PM

I started Chef Greweling's chocolate and confections class at the CIA today....will post pictures from the class as we finish product.

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Looking forward to the report...
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#557 Lior

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Posted 27 May 2008 - 10:46 PM

I started Chef Greweling's chocolate and confections class at the CIA today....will post pictures from the class as we finish product.

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Would you mind asking about the liquor cordial question that I posted above?
Enjoy! I am sure it will be amazing! Lucky lucky you!! I willbe at Callebaut in Belgium in 2 weeks for an advanced course. I can't wait!

I agree with Chris, the Habanos above look beautiful. I will also try them.

Edited by Lior, 28 May 2008 - 04:37 AM.


#558 Kerry Beal

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 04:06 AM

I started Chef Greweling's chocolate and confections class at the CIA today....will post pictures from the class as we finish product.

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Tiny,

Can't wait for reports!

Would you find out if chef Greweling does any classes either outside the school or in week long blocks at the school for those of us with day jobs.

#559 patris

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 05:03 AM

This weekend I'm going to make Kerry's caramels again. Maybe the following weekend I'll try the Chai Tigers in the molds.

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The Chai Tigers are exceptional. I did the truffles over the weekend, and the ganache was so soft it was hard to work with. Probably because I didn't table it sufficiently, but the consistency would be perfect for a molded piece.
Patty

#560 Tiny

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 07:06 PM

This weekend I'm going to make Kerry's caramels again. Maybe the following weekend I'll try the Chai Tigers in the molds.

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The Chai Tigers are exceptional. I did the truffles over the weekend, and the ganache was so soft it was hard to work with. Probably because I didn't table it sufficiently, but the consistency would be perfect for a molded piece.

View Post


I made the Chai Tigers today in class....the key with working with a milk or white chocolate pipped ganache is that it must be allowed to get out of the intermediate temperature zone before it is tabled or else it will usually seperate. What we did was made the ganache, poured it into a hotel pan and let it sit covered in plastic wrap for about 2 hours till it firmed up. Then we emptied it on the marble and "tabled" it. I use this term loosely because tabling a ganche is nothing like tabling to to temper. Tabling a ganache should be done very gently and slowly. What we do with chocolate and white ganaches in particular is that once they have ben allowed to pre crystalize somewhat in the hotel pan, we lightly spread them on the marble, bring them in, and let them rest for 2 minutes by the clock, then we repeat once more then into the piping bag.

Dark ganaches are tabled directly after being emulsified, but again it is very slow, pretty much like if you pushed a slow motion button on normal tabling. Dark is usually ready after 3 rounds of tabling. It is important to not agitate it too much, or else you will get a very short texture....

Lior & Kerry, I will ask chef...

#561 Lior

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 09:49 PM

Thanks so much! And thanks for asking!

#562 patris

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 04:44 AM

That's hugely helpful guidance for a novice like me, Tiny - thank you!
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#563 Tiny

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 03:08 PM

My chocolate's Facebook Album


Sorry about the quality of these pictures, I use my camera on my phone while I'm in class...

#564 Kerry Beal

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 04:08 PM

My chocolate's Facebook Album


Sorry about the quality of these pictures, I use my camera on my phone while I'm in class...

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Blake - tell us more about making what I assume are the anise sticks.

#565 Lior

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 09:54 PM

Thank you so much for the pictures!! I would love to hear any comments or tips if you learned any! Did you enjoy it? DId you learn a lot? Was there a favorite flavour?
Thanks again for sharing!

#566 prairiegirl

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Posted 30 May 2008 - 11:30 AM

I have not ever tabled my ganache, but fter reading the posts I am very interested. How many of you table your ganache? Lat night I went and read the section on tabling. So who tables and how much of a difference does it make?

#567 Kerry Beal

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Posted 30 May 2008 - 01:16 PM

I have not ever tabled my ganache, but fter reading the posts I am very interested. How many of you table your ganache?  Lat night I went and read the section on tabling.  So who tables and how much of a difference does it make?

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Never have.

#568 John DePaula

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Posted 30 May 2008 - 02:53 PM

I have not ever tabled my ganache, but fter reading the posts I am very interested. How many of you table your ganache?  Lat night I went and read the section on tabling.  So who tables and how much of a difference does it make?

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I have never tabled my ganaches either. Just seems kinda gross to me...

Not only would it make a huge mess but I bet the shelf-life would adversely affected, too.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#569 Lior

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 01:18 AM

I also haven't. But would the mixing it be more or less the same??

#570 Tiny

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 10:00 AM

Kerry, the anise sticks are made using the piped ganache technique. Bring cream and glucose just to a boil then pour over unmelted, tempered chocolate, let sit for a minute the emulsify. Stream in pernod and mix till combined. Pour the mixture into a hotel pan, wrapped in plastic wrap, and let sit at room temp till it has pre crystalized some and thickened (about an hour or two). Once it is thickened, pour out onto a marble and spread out once very gently and slowly and bring back in, wait 2 minutes, spread out once more and bring back in. Place into a doubled up piping bag since the ganache will be very thick. Using a number 3 tip, pipe lines across the back of a sheet pan on parchment. Allow the ganache time to set (20 minutes, but an hour is better). brush them with a light precoat of tempered milk chocolate, once set, roll over and precoat other side. After precoat has crystalized, cut into 2 inch pieces. Set up dipping station with cut sticks on left bowl of tempered milk chocolate in middle, sheet pan with glazing screen on right and sheet pan with parchment on far right (if you are right handed...lefties just reverse this order).

The technique used in the finishing these is called chardon. It is imperrative that the ganache be precoated. First dip the sicks in the chocolate, it doesn't have to be a perfect coat since they will be rolled anyway. Then place them on the glazing screen and allow them to set till the chocolate will hold a peak. Gently roll them across the screen and remove them to the parchment. The amount you roll them is a personal thing, some people like the look ov heavily rolled, some like a lightly rolled, I prefer the lightly rolled as there will be spots inbetween the spikes that are nice shiney smooth tempered chocolate.


As far as the whole tabling ganache thing goes, I had never done it till I got to this class. After asking chef about it and listening to a few of his lectures, I am convinced that it is worth the extra effort. First reason is that in pipped ganaches it is important to have a ganche that is firm enough to work with. The anise sticks or cinnamon stacks are example of pieces that would work much less effectively had they not been tabled. 2nd reason it is important is for quality reasons. When you start with a tempered, unmelted chocolate in a ganache, even after emulsifying with boiling cream, you still have some seed crystals remaining if allowed to set as is, unstable forms of cocoa butter crystals will form, the agitation of tabling the ganache promotes the formation of stable form V cocoa butter crystals. If you ganache sets and is untempered, it will leave a grainy texture and be difficult to work with. A tempered ganache sets firmer with a more pleasant, creamy mouth feel (although pipped ganaches will have a shorter texture than slabbed or molded ganaches). 3rd reason to table your ganache is actually an increase in shelf life. If your ganache is made up stable cocoa butter crystals, it will remain at a higher quality than one that is made up of unstable crystals that are constantly in flux. A 3 week old tempered ganache will still taste smooth as a 3 weeks old untempered ganache will have a noticable compromise in flavor and texture. As long as you work on a sanitized marble, shelf life will be increased.

These reasons are also the reasons when making slabbed ganache one should start with melted but in temper chocolate at it's maximum working temp and the liquid being added should be at 105 F....that way you end up with a slab of tempered ganache that doesent need agitation.

Is all this nessecary for the casual chocolate maker that will eat their pieces in a week or so, maybe not, but if your going through the trouble, why not do it right?





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