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white truffle oil


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14 replies to this topic

#1 JodyS

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 03:26 PM

Hi, I just picked up a copy of The French Laundry and I was hoping someone could tell me where to look for white truffle oil, either in Montreal or on the internet. Brand suggestions would be appreciated as well, since I know very little at this point about how to go about choosing one. I've being doing a little reading and like anything else, it seems that some oils are better than others. I'm sure this has to do with the manner in which the oil is infused. If anyone can explain it to me, I'd love to know.

#2 DerekW

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 03:49 PM

While they're not my 'supplier of choice', I've seen both white and black truffle oils on the 'fancy food' shelves at Homesense. They have a couple of stores in Montreal.
If you get stuck perhaps Gourmet Warehouse in Vancouver [who carry a range of truffled-up products including oil] could post something to you, but there are bound to be local suppliers.

cheers
Derek

#3 Lesley C

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 03:56 PM

Try Capitol at the Jean-Talon market, or Les Douceurs du Marche at the Atwater market. Gourmet Laurier would be another good place to look, as would either location of Le Fouvrac.

#4 chankonabe

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 04:03 PM

I've heard that white truffle oil is always artificially flavored? Better to go with a good black truffle oil, that may or may not be. It's difficult to tell the difference really, between the black and the white, especially when not tasting them all by themselves. It's hard for me to justify the extra cost of the white truffle oil over the black just because real white truffles are more expensive than real black truffles.

#5 JodyS

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 04:35 PM

I've heard that white truffle oil is always artificially flavored? Better to go with a good black truffle oil, that may or may not be. It's difficult to tell the difference really, between the black and the white, especially when not tasting them all by themselves.  It's hard for me to justify the extra cost of the white truffle oil over the black just because real white truffles are more expensive than real black truffles.

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White truffles and black are quite different though. I can't imagine how they'd both taste the same. The aroma of fresh white truffles can fill a room whereas the same can not be said for black.

Are they really chemically flavored? If so, that's a bummer. Regardless, i've never cooked with this stuff before and I'd love to hear any insights the more experienced might have.

Leslie, believe it or not i've never been to the Jean-Talon market; I thought it was mainly fruits and vegetables. I just started cooking a couple of months ago but I'm really getting in to it. I guess it's finally time to check it out.

I'll be keeping an eye out for authentic balsamic vinegar as well. I didn't even know the grocery store stuff was fake until I started reading Keller's books, which are both fantastic btw. I eat out at good restaurants quite often so I'm quite surprised I've never had the real stuff and am looking forward to it. Incidentally, is age of big importance? Will I notice a difference between 10, 20, 100 yr. old?

I appreciate the responses.

Edited by JodyS, 18 December 2006 - 04:51 PM.


#6 cmling

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 04:55 PM

Sorry for being a bit vague, but I read in a reliable magazine that ALL white truffle oil is entirely artificial and to be avoided like the plague, at least if you want to have truffles involved in whatever you are doing.

Charley
Charles Milton Ling
Vienna, Austria

#7 JodyS

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 05:12 PM

Sorry for being a bit vague, but I read in a reliable magazine that ALL white truffle oil is entirely artificial and to be avoided like the plague, at least if you want to have truffles involved in whatever you are doing.

Charley

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That's both interesting and depressing. So restaurants just use it so they can have white truffles in the name of their dish, even though the black is better in this case? I suppose it's not surprising at $30-40, but you'd think there would be $100+ per bottle authentic stuff as well.

#8 Thesorus

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 04:44 AM

I bought a small bottle of an Italian White Truffle Infused Oil from "Gourmet Laurier" at $22 for 100ml, It's an "Elle Esse" brand with some truffle pieces on the bottom of the bottle.

ingredients : EEVO, white truffle flavoring ( Tuber Magnatum Pico ), dried White Truffles, White Spring Truffles ( Tuber Albidum), White Truffles.

I don't know how it compare to the real thing if this is not the "real thing" but it has a nice fragrance.

#9 legourmet

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 05:22 AM

Sorry for being a bit vague, but I read in a reliable magazine that ALL white truffle oil is entirely artificial and to be avoided like the plague, at least if you want to have truffles involved in whatever you are doing.

Charley

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Right. All truffle oil is artificial.
H.B. aka "Legourmet"

#10 gruyere

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 06:55 AM

If you go to les Douceurs du Marche (first floor, north end, Atwater Market) try to make it at a time that is not too busy and talk to one of the guys behind the cash. They are quite knowledgeable and are happy to help when there is not a large line-up of customers.
If you are reading literature by or about Keller you will know that he is obsessed with detail and sometimes the smallest element of a recipe requires a great deal of effort. The FLC is full of such examples. If, as you say, you are just embarking on your ‘cooking career’ you may want to look at his Bouchon Cookbook which is much less complex but yet does not stray from his strict principles of quality throughout the process.

#11 riboflavinjoe

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Posted 20 December 2006 - 04:57 PM

balsamic, i have fattoria estense 12 year old, which was around 35 a bottle. you will definitely notice a difference in the ages of balsamics, the older it is, the sweeter and thicker is becomes. i think the bottle i mentioned is a good deal, when you look at price and quality. i got it in the atwater market, but i know cavallero in westmount has it too.
"Bells will ring, ting-a-ling-a-ling, ting.... the bell... bing... 'moray" -John Daker

#12 JodyS

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 01:27 AM

If you are reading literature by or about Keller you will know that he is obsessed with detail and sometimes the smallest element of a recipe requires a great deal of effort.  The FLC is full of such examples. If, as you say, you are just embarking on your ‘cooking career’ you may want to look at his Bouchon Cookbook which is much less complex but yet does not stray from his strict principles of quality throughout the process.

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This is definitely true. I also own Bouchon and it's great for day-to-day fare. I loved the bit on glazing root vegetables. I've got the technique down perfectly and they always taste delicious. I researched and bought 9 cookbooks when I started cooking but Keller's are my favorite.

#13 Montreal

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 04:46 PM

White truffle oil has to be chemically flavored as the actual white truffle goes at 7,500 dollars per kilo. You can find the black and white truffle in montreal at the atwater market. I shop exclusively at Chez Louis at the atwater market. They have black year round and white in season.

Beware that some market would sell you the truffle from china that has no Taste and barely smell anything. This is why a reliable supplier is a must.

#14 IndyRob

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 05:26 PM

I too have read that all truffle oils are artificial. Then, one day I was at a specialty butcher shop and was waiting for the current customer to be rung up when I noticed jars of small black truffles (3-4) in oil. The label said black truffles in oil, not truffle oil. The price was somewhere around $30 for a small jar.

Immediately, my impulse buy mechanism was in full-on conflict with my BS detector. The BS detector won out on this occasion by appealing to my cautious nature, but I've been curious ever since. Has anyone ever seen/tried these?

#15 Montreal

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 05:43 PM

Truffle are indeed expansive but are worth the money. I make my own black truffle oil by infusing black truffle in grape seed oil. The infusion last about 2 months