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"Baking: From My Home to Yours" (Part 1)


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#121 tamiam

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 10:15 PM

This Saturday it was Cornmeal Maple Biscuits (hope I got the name right). Another winner from this book. I had them made by the time the oven heated up.
Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther

#122 rjwong

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 10:34 PM

While many, including myself, are vicariously & literally enjoying Dorie's baking recipes in the other discussion thread, I do have a general question related to the publication of the book for Dorie:


Dorie, are there any plans to have book signings and/or baking demonstrations featuring your new book, "Baking: from my home to yours"?


Personally, I wouldn't mind if someone, like a food magazine, would host a book signing/baking demo event in, say, the Los Angeles area, for example ... hint, hint ...
Russell J. Wong aka "rjwong"

Food and I, we go way back ...

#123 Anna N

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 11:45 PM

I rarely bake. I don't even want to bake but you are all making me lust after this darn book. Stop it! :raz:
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#124 Patricia Austin

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 08:37 AM

I've been following this thread with happiness and received my copy of Dorie's new book on Friday. I made the chocolate chip cookies. (I don't have the book in front of me but I believe it said "my best chocolate chip cookies". Sorry, no photo options). Like many bakers, I too have tried a bazillion CCC recipes and these are my new favorite: exactly as described with crispy, buttery edges and softer centers, very yummy and a nice slight wrinkle/dimple factor after cooling from the oven. Thanks Dorie!

Patricia

#125 Dorie Greenspan

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 08:48 AM

In answer to rjwong's question about booksignings, I'm going to be in a bunch of cities doing various signings and events (including Los Angeles on November 19 and 20 -- I think). As soon as I've got my schedule straightened out, I'll post it because I would LOVE to meet my fellow egulleters.

#126 Jean Blanchard

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 08:59 AM

Just made the carrot muffins and sampled for breakfast. Carrot cake is my husbands favorite dessert so I thought this would be a great morning treat. And guess what.....they were! Just as Dorie says, they're not too sweet but have all of the components of a carrot cake. The rest go in the freezer so that I can move on to another muffin and have a nice assortment for brunch with guests. Well, maybe I'll save two for tomorrow. :wink:

#127 heyjude

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 09:33 AM

Seattlites, Dorie will be at 2 Cooks and Books events at Macrina Bakery on First Ave. on Nov. 15th. Call there for times and reservations (206 448-4089).
Judy Amster
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#128 RuthWells

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 07:15 AM

I'm trying to be patient and wait for Santa to bring me this book, but ya'll are making it very difficult!

#129 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 07:36 AM

I'm trying to be patient and wait for Santa to bring me this book, but ya'll are making it very difficult!

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I'm with you on that one. I thought I'd wait till it hit Costco in Canada but it's getting very hard to be patient.
Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

#130 Jean Blanchard

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 07:57 AM

After viewing Patrick's picture of the rum soaked vanilla cake, I HAD to make it. It was the best and easiest to make cake of its type I've ever made. I soaked one in rum (no little guys around our house, Patrick) and left the other plain and stashed in the freezer. The rum soak puts it over the top! I was thinking of making a lemon curd for the other one but since there is rum in the batter, (but I haven't tasted the cake minus the soak) I'm wondering if that combination won't be good. Dorie or Patrick, what do you think?

#131 Pat W

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 08:06 AM

I'm trying to be patient and wait for Santa to bring me this book, but ya'll are making it very difficult!

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I'm with you on that one. I thought I'd wait till it hit Costco in Canada but it's getting very hard to be patient.

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Yes, this would have been a great Christmas idea & I tried my best to hold out for it. But after wavering for at least a week, I broke down & placed the order. I couldn't help myself. I think it was the biscuits that finally did me in.

pat w.
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Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

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#132 CaliPoutine

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 08:25 AM

So I made the basic biscuit recipe from Dorie's book.  I used buttermilk and added the baking soda as directed.  I didn't have any parchment, so I used my silipat and I froze them.

After baking:
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They were good.  They were damn good.  They're the best biscuits I've ever made.  But I don't think they rose to the fluffy biscuit height that I've seen others achieve.  I worked the butter in with my fingers, and I had all the requisite chunks and pebbles.  I think I did everything right.  So I'm thinking maybe I patted the dough out too thin to begin with?

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Just a thought, but do you think the difference could be because Canadian AP flour is different than American AP flour.

Having baked for years in the states and then moving to Canada, I've noticed a difference using Canadian Flour. I know for a fact, the protein levels are different, but I'm not sure who's is higher.

#133 Betts

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 10:03 AM

Canadian flour is distinctly higher in protein than American - something like 20% I think.

#134 Marlene

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 10:33 AM

It could be. I wonder if it would make a difference if I used some Canadian flour and some cake flour. I had intended to use cake flour in these but completely forgot and ended up using all AP.
Marlene
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Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

#135 apronstrings

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 11:38 AM

:wacko: I want to make Dorie's biscuits to accompany a Butternut Squash and Apple Soup I will be making next month. Will the biscuits be just as delicious if they are PARTLY baked, frozen, and completed on Thanksgiving?

#136 Dorie Greenspan

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 12:06 PM

Aprongstrings -- I don't think partially baking the biscuits, freezing them and finishing them off on Thanksgiving is a good idea. I've never done it, but my guess is you'll really lose height and texture that way. My suggestion is to either freeze them raw and bake them when you need them, or bake them all the way thru, cool them and freeze them. On Thanksgiving, bring them to room temperature and then warm them.

Jean -- what to serve with the Rum-Drenched Vanilla loaves? Hmmm. I like berries, but if you can't get berries now, how about a great chunky jam? Or maybe some sauteed apples? Whipped cream or creme fraiche is never bad. You might even think about a chocolate sauce. Milk chocolate is nice with rum. Of course, by the time you decide, you might not have any cake left!


I'm so touched that so many of you have said "thank you" -- I'm the one who should thank everyone on this thread. It's such a thrill for me to see what you are baking from my book and to hear you say that you and your family and friends are enjoying what you've made. To all of you: THANK YOU!!

#137 MelissaH

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 07:18 AM

I made another Honey's Apple Cake, except that this time it was a Pear Cake. I used Bartletts, almost but not quite ripe, this time. And it worked beautifully well. I kept the cinnamon in, and was quite happy with the result.

The little Seckel pears were more delicious, with almost a spicy flavor. But the Bartletts were soooooo much easier! They were much bigger, so the peeling and seeding part was less onerous. And because the Bartletts were firmer than the Seckels, they were easier to handle overall. I did like the way the Bartletts held their shape, probably because they really needed about another day or two to ripen. Next time I'll try with riper big pears of some kind, I think, and see how much of a difference that makes in the overall cake, or whether the filling turns to mush very quickly (in which case maybe turning on the convection to my oven might help?). Part of me says to just use the Seckels despite the size issues, because they disappear in short order but we can get Boscs and Bartletts and other big pears for more of the year.


Oh, did I mention that it's great for breakfast?

MelissaH

edited to be more specific.

Edited by MelissaH, 03 October 2006 - 03:12 PM.

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Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

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#138 scarlett

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 07:29 AM

I was thinking of making a lemon curd for the other one but since there is rum in the batter, (but I haven't tasted the cake minus the soak) I'm wondering if that combination won't be good.  Dorie or Patrick, what do you think?

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What about a lime curd? With the rum that might compliment a tropical bent...
Traca
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blog: Seattle Tall Poppy

#139 scarlett

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 07:42 AM

I just ordered a copy of the book...and I can't wait to start playing with you all!

Dorrie...I also just noticed you will be here in Seattle in November. I'm so excited! With any luck I'll catch up with you at a book signing...and a well worn copy of your book. :)

Cheers!
Traca
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#140 Jean Blanchard

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 08:46 AM

Lime curd is an excellent idea! Dorie, hopefully I'll be able to catch up with you in Chicago. By the way, I think the rum vanilla cake is even better the next day.

#141 Marlene

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 05:39 PM

My second attempt at Dorie's biscuits tonight. This time I used the 1 3/4 cup flour and 1/3 cup cake flour. I also used buttermilk again and added the baking soda. I cut them a little thicker than last time. They certainly rose higher, but I found them somewhat drier than the first batch. My first clue should have been the dough. I felt the dough was drier this time when I was bringing it together, but kept going anyway:

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image
Marlene
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Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

#142 ludja

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 09:16 PM

^Those biscuits rose pretty high, just a bit unevenly.

I made biscuits a few times this summer after not making them for awhile. It took me a couple batches before they came out well. (This happens every time I don't make them for awhile... :smile:

What seemed to help me:

Speed in mixing dough, rolling out and getting into oven. (I'm intrigued by this recipe where Dorie suggests the option of freezing the raw dough.)

Making sure the dough was wet enough. I had to sometimes add a bit more liquid than was specified (in the recipe I used)

Rolling/patting out the dough thickly enough. (sounds like you did this; and I also found this to be important)

Cut the dough rounds with a biscuit cutter round. It is open in the middle so that the dough does not get compressed as in the case of using a glass or other closed container. Mine is metal and has a pretty sharp cutting edge.

Cut rounds as close together as possible to minimize the amount of dough that needs to be re-rolled out as these don't usually rise as high as those from the first patting out.


Why do the raw biscuits look kind of misshapen? There seems to be an overhang at the top of the uncooked biscuits. I think this might be affecting the evenness of the rise and final shape.

(As you mention, the raw dough *does* look like it might be a little dry compared to what I found worked well...)

I want some of those biscuits right now!

Edited by ludja, 03 October 2006 - 09:17 PM.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#143 Marlene

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 03:59 AM

Thanks! I do have a biscuit cutter and that's what I used. I am freezing the raw dough first but I should perhaps try them fresh. One thing about biscuits is that they aren't terribly labour or ingredient intensive, so I can practice every day!

I think they are mishappen because I'm not very good at patting the dough out evenly, trying as I am to not work the dough too much. Given the differences that I'm hearing about with Canadian flour, it seems like I do need a little more liquid, especially if I'm going to use some cake flour as well. I've also been using my fingers to mix the butter into the dough, but I don't seem to get that "pebbly" effect everyone talks about. Maybe I should try a pastry cutter. Why do I think biscuits are on the menu again tonight? :rolleyes:
Marlene
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Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

#144 RuthWells

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 08:13 AM

Scarlett/Traca and anyone else who is interested:  I'll be doing a dinner in Simsbury, Ct on October 26, then I'll be traveling a lot in November.  I'll be in Philadelphia, Washington, DC, Chicago, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Kansas City, Madison, CT, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles.  Then in December, I'll be in Boston and at the Central Markets in Houston, Dallas, Fort Worth, San Antonio and Austin.  I don't have my schedule buttoned down yet, but as soon as I do, I'll post it.  I would LOVE to meet as many of you as I can.

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I'll be first in line in Philadelphia! To heck with waiting for Santa to bring me the book! :wink:

#145 lcdm

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 09:45 AM

I also purchased the book at Costco.
For my first recipe I made the Cardamom crumb cake. I didn't know how orange, expresso and cardamom would work but it did. It was very nice - not too sweet.
I baked it a little longer than the recipe specified (the knife did not come out clean) and the nuts browned too much. Would using a glass pan caused this, maybe I'll use a metal pan next time?
Thanks,
Lisa

#146 cakewalk

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 11:01 AM

I also purchased the book at Costco.
For my first recipe I made the Cardamom crumb cake. I didn't know how orange, expresso and cardamom would work but it did. It was very nice - not too sweet.
I baked it a little longer than the recipe specified (the knife did not come out clean) and the nuts browned too much. Would using a glass pan caused this, maybe I'll use a metal pan next time?
Thanks,
Lisa

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I made this last week, and also thought the same thing. Cardamom and coffee is a lovely combination, but I never would have guessed that orange rind would be so nice together with it. Alas, I left it in the oven a bit too long (note to self: stop watching TV while stuff is in the oven!) so it was a bit dry, but nice anyway. I will bake it again and be more careful about the baking time. I just love cardamom. :wub: Next up will be the madeleines. Every time I make madeleines they taste wonderful and the texture is good, but they don't get that darn hump! I've come to realize that the fault lies not in my recipes, but in myself. :sad: But I will keep trying.

#147 John DePaula

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 12:38 PM

Jean -- what to serve with the Rum-Drenched Vanilla loaves?  Hmmm.  I like berries, but if you can't get berries now, how about a great chunky jam?  Or maybe some sauteed apples?  Whipped cream or creme fraiche is never bad.  You might even think about a chocolate sauce.  Milk chocolate is nice with rum.  Of course, by the time you decide, you might not have any cake left!

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I like a quick sauté of fresh figs with a touch of butter, spices (vanilla pod) and alcohol (rum / sauternes / etc.) and on top a nice dollop of creme fraiche. Yum!
John DePaula
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#148 choux

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 06:21 PM

Dorie,
I want to make the Devil's Food White Out Cake for Saturday and I have a question about the directions for the frosting.
It says to boil the syrup to 242 and the start beating the egg whites. In the next paragraph, it says to beat the egg whites and boil the syrup to 235. Am I correct in assuming that it is meant to say start beating whites at 235, and add syrup to whites when it reaches 242? It does sort of say that, but awkwardly, so I wanted to double check.
Thanks.

#149 Dorie Greenspan

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 11:31 PM

Choux,

You are right -- the final temperature of the syrup should be 242 degrees F. Because it takes time to reach that temperature and because it also takes time to beat the egg whites until they are the right consistency, the first mention of 242 and beating the whites is to prepare you for what you must do and to give you a way of doing it.

Get set up -- put the eggs in the mixing bowl and put the syrup ingredients in the saucepan. Start cooking the syrup.

When the syrup reaches about 235 degrees F, start beating the egg whites.

The syrup goes into the whites when it is 242 degrees F.

I hope this makes it clear and I really hope you enjoy the cake! Let us know.

#150 cakewalk

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Posted 05 October 2006 - 08:32 AM

I was going to make the madeleines but was seduced by the biscotti instead. (I think it was the immediacy that did it.) These are easy to make and really good biscotti (although a bit on the sweet side for me. If I reduced the sugar to 3/4 cup would that mess up the balance of the recipe?) I love it that they're crunchy and don't break my teeth if I don't dip them in coffee, yet they don't fall apart if I do. I had way too many with my coffee this morning. I gave the rest to the concierge in my building. They really love this book!! (I have to get a camera.)