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Ice Cream Machines


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241 replies to this topic

#31 andiesenji

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Posted 04 March 2005 - 06:15 AM

andie :)

re what you would get now....

what makes you pick the musso over the oxiria?  there's a difference in pricepoint...do you feel the motor/mechanics are better with the musso?  does the oxiria require some extra care (like one machine i read about that required something like 2 tablespoons of alcohol between the bowl and the interior...not sure i get that).

i have $105 in amazon gift certificates, and amazon would take anothe $25 off (their current promotion)...bringing the lusso down to $475.

that would make the lusso $475 vs.  the oxiria at $360. 

i'm a little leery of the lello, for all the reasons mentioned above. 

thanks to everyone for all the replies, btw.  :)
cheers :)

hc

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The Musso is heavier (10 pounds heavier than the Nemox) - The Nemox tends to "walk" a bit and so has to be placed on a non-slip pad or on a cart with a raised edge.
The Lello works fine, no problems, it just has a smaller capacity than the Nemox or Musso.

It is simply personal preference, I like the looks of the Musso and think it may be made for heavier use.

My old Simac was the 2-quart model and I would prefer a 2-quart model but at the time I was in a hurry and was able to get the Lello shipped in two days, the others would all have taken much longer.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#32 halloweencat

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Posted 04 March 2005 - 07:53 AM

good details. :) thanks, andiesenji.


jeni, thanks for the heads up on that model.


btw....found another one....

does anyone have any experience with the delonghi 8500?


http://www.sendicecr...licecreamm.html



cheers :)

hc

#33 andiesenji

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Posted 06 March 2005 - 10:37 AM

I don't know anything about the delonghi machine, however I have not had a lot of success with other delonghi appliances in recent times.
I bought their top of line deep fryer which was returned after the first use. It did not perform as advertised.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#34 marinade

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Posted 07 March 2005 - 07:33 AM

I’m kind of partial to the Simac products. I had a 1.5-quart Simac Il Gelataio that lasted 13 years and I beat the crap out of it. I bought the next Simac model up that looks something like this: Simac-DeLonghi . Bought it 5 years ago as a Simac and its still making great sorbets. It appears to be the same model. The removable bowl is a plus because I can prime the process by putting it into the freezer for a slight chill. Also you can order more than one bowl. If you can find one, grab it. I think they’re real sleepers. I just may snag another one myself for back-up in the event they’re discontinued. I originally bought a Musso Lussino from Williams-Sonoma but returned it (for the Simac) because it overheated.
On the other extreme, I had a 5-gallon Emory-Thompson batch freezer hard wired in my basement. It had a 3-horsepower compressor and a 3-horsepower dasher. That thing just spat out gallons of sorbet.
Looking at the previous links, I'm curious as to what’s happening in the ice cream appliance market. Did DeLonghi buy out Simac, or did Simac merge with Musso Lussino? Or is it just a distribution thing?

Edited by marinade, 07 March 2005 - 07:46 AM.

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#35 marinade

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Posted 07 March 2005 - 07:55 AM

Just a quick update to my previous post. The Simac model that I was referring to was the Magnum. I’ve learned they were discontinued but here is a link for a refurbished one for about $385.00, newer ones are $489.00. These folks also service them.

Simac Magnum
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#36 halloweencat

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Posted 29 March 2005 - 07:48 AM

thanks all and everyone for their great, informed input.

my SO and i decided to go with the musso lussino...it's on the expensive side (decidedly), but we had quite a cache of amazon gift certificates kicking around between us (birthday and xmas gifts), plus amazon is giving back $25 if you spend $125 in kitchen&bath (thru this friday, march 31). that brought the price down +considerably+.

i'm very excited to finally be able to try all the wonderful recipies i've been seeing in cookbooks (it's so frustrating to purchase a cookbook and have a good chunk of the recipies be unuseable because one doesn't have the right equipment).

anyway, i'm +very+ excited. :) thank you all. :)


cheers :)


hc



edited to add: the final price, given the additional gift certificates generally donated by my SO was $375. a great price for this machine, i think.

Edited by halloweencat, 29 March 2005 - 07:51 AM.


#37 misstenacity

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Posted 19 June 2005 - 09:41 PM

Bumping thread due to my frustrations with my Donvier....

So, I've got a Donvier hand-crank, pre-freeze bowl model. I have had totally mixed results with it - great, creamy, luscious ice cream, as well as crystalline, rock-hard icy crap.

The problem is, I can't draw any big conclusions since I vary my recipes so much in their stabilizer content that its either just the stabilizers messing with me, or my freezer's temp is too variable. Or possibly too cold - the batter starts freezing solid at the edges the second I pour it in and I have to crank like crazy to get it going.

By stabilizer I mean: fat, protein, alcohol, or actual "stabilizer" like gums, powdered milk, gelatin, etc.

THE BIG QUESTION: When making a lower fat concoction, am I going to get a better result with a motorized machine (however cheap), than with a hand-cranker?

Thank you! :-)

Andrea
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#38 tan319

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 06:13 AM

If you're not going to spring for the cuisinart 50 buck guy, which is not bad, and you don't mind going with the salt and ice scenario, go down to the Kmart at Astor place or someplace like that and get a 4 qt. rival machine for 17.00 bucks or so.
I'm getting tremendous results, believe it or not, with mine, especially the 4 qt. one.
Very fluffy, good spin.
Much better then the cusinnart, much messier though if you're not careful.

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Get the Rival 4 qt., some ice and some rock salt.
You'll get a much better product then a Donvier or a Krups/Cuisineart/etc.

trust me on this...

P.S. You can also use the box as a sound insulator(turn upside down, top off)
2317/5000

#39 SethG

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 07:11 AM

I'll just chime in to say I've been happy with the Cuisinart. I've only made very high-fat, creamy eggy ice creams with it. This weekend I made a basic vanilla I've been playing around with (I got a big batch of vanilla beans), except after scalding the milk I infused it with a big batch of mint. Best mint ice cream I've ever had. Heaven.

The Rival does sound enticing, too. I might get one of those four quart jobs and take it out on the sidewalk with the kids. Sounds like good Saturday afternoon fun, no?

Edited by SethG, 20 June 2005 - 07:16 AM.

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#40 Eden

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 07:31 AM

another vote for the Krups here. as FWED mentions there can be a thin hard layer on the bottom, but it's generally a good reliable machine.
We bought this brand after talking to a Chef who had gone through like 3 other brands first and killed the motors on all of them!
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#41 cjsadler

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 09:24 AM

There was an article in some cooking mag recently on ice cream makers. They rated the Kitchenaid attachment the best, saying it made superb, ultra creamy mousse-like ice creams. I currently have the Cuisinart and agree with the article's assessment that the results are 'slightly icy, but acceptable'. For high fat ice creams it does just fine (but then simply freezing a high fat ice cream in a pan works nearly as well. Try it sometime-- John Thorne has a recipe for a no-machine lemon ice cream in the book 'Outlaw Cook'. You'll be very surprised by the results), but for gelato style (ie-- lower fat ice cream) and sorbets especially, the Cuisinart results are disappointing. However, I'm not sure it's even possible to make creamy textured sorbets like you get at a place that does them well (Capogiro in Philadelphia for example) without stabilizers and such (at Capogiro especially, I think I've asked them more than once 'so there isn't ANY cream in this??')

Can anyone vouch for the superiority of the Kitchenaid over the Cuisinart?

Edited by cjsadler, 20 June 2005 - 11:10 AM.

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#42 SethG

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 01:41 PM

I currently have the Cuisinart and agree with the article's assessment that the results are 'slightly icy, but acceptable'.  For high fat ice creams it does just fine (but then simply freezing a high fat ice cream in a pan works nearly as well.  Try it sometime-- John Thorne has a recipe for a no-machine lemon ice cream in the book 'Outlaw Cook'.  You'll be very surprised by the results), but for gelato style (ie-- lower fat ice cream) and sorbets especially, the Cuisinart results are disappointing. 

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I should say, upon reflection, that I have made one "gelato style" ice cream, Mario Batali's honey vanilla gelato, which contained some heavy cream but was mostly milk-based. And the results from my Cuisinart were super. I read that article and I can't say I've found any of the ice cream that I've made to be "icy," although I'm still new at this. So long as you get the mixture good and cold, even close to freezing it, before you put it into the machine, I find the results are really good. I had one batch where it really wasn't cold enough, and I could see it wasn't going well so I aborted the operation and refrigerated the mixture for another 12 hours, and then it went fine.
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#43 BarbaraY

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 05:27 PM

I have a Krups and it makes good ice cream.  My only criticism of it is that a sheet of hard ice/cream mixture forms on the bottom of the canister.  I am not sure if this is because there is a space between the dasher and the bottom of the canister and/or the canister is too cold.  I am planning on experimenting with the temp of the freezer and the placement of the unit in the freezer to see if I can avoid this layering.

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I have one of these and have the same problem. I just consider that film of frozen stuff my reward for making ice cream.:D

#44 saltylicious

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 06:28 PM

Check out Gourmet mag (April/2005) page 54 for the
Ice Cream maker review article...

Gourmet's top rated KA ice cream attachment is very clumsy and clunky. ..imo

Donviers are great fun for a kids / childish adults ice cream party. They easy to clean & super cheap (only $3-4 at salvation army/goodwill stores/garage sales)
Suzanne

#45 simdelish

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Posted 21 June 2005 - 10:08 AM

However, I'm not sure it's even possible to make creamy textured sorbets like you get at a place that does them well (Capogiro in Philadelphia for example) without stabilizers and such (at Capogiro especially, I think I've asked them more than once 'so there isn't ANY cream in this??')

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The stabilizers really don't have much to do with texture, only as texture becomes an issue with a product that is more than a few days old(or one that goes through heat shock). If you are going to eat up your ice cream as soon as you make it (or later that day), stablizers will do nothing for you. Stablizers are really for helping with shelf life. They act on the unfrozen portions of water suspended in the mixture. That is to say, they help maintain the desired firmness and texture that is present when the ice cream is freshly made. While some ice creams and sorbets are still fine after a few days, others (depending on their ingredients) will get coarse and ice-y, separate, get grainy and/or syrupy. That's because the water molecules "migrate" to elsewhere in the mix, where they can freeze hard into crystals. The stablizers help keep them (the water molecules) where they belong, basically, and don't let them travel out of bounds and get caught and freeze.

It's also really the sugars (lactose in the milk, fructose in the fruit or glucose added as an extra ingredient, but not sucrose) that contribute to the depressed freezing point, and therefore the smooth texture. I find that it's the processing that really makes things creamy to begin with. My sorbets, for example, are rich, creamy and satin on the tongue, yet they are made of nothing more than fruit, water and sugar. But they spin continuously, beating air, lightness, consistency and smoothness into your product. (Which is the whole concept behind PacoJets which don't spin a liquid ingredient, but rather they 'shave' off a frozen ingredient... but that's another lecture :wink: ).

But if you want to have your ice cream last, or have to deal with heat shock (the term for when everytime you pull out the container to scoop up a serving, or have to keep it in a display case like at the shops), then you need to add the stablizers.

HTH
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#46 bradyvickers

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Posted 21 June 2005 - 10:28 AM

Just purchased a KitchenAid ice cream maker attachment. Thought about the Krups, but since it's being discontinued decided to try something different. I picked the KitchenAid because of its capacity, ease of adding ingredients during the churning process, and I didn't want another "appliance" that I would have to find space for. The kitchen aid takes up little extra room, especially if you keep the bowl in the freezer.

I'm making a raspberry custard ice cream today, using the CIA's formula. I'll let you guys know how it turns out.

#47 Gifted Gourmet

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Posted 28 June 2005 - 05:42 PM

Slate article

I rated each machine in the following categories on a scale of one to 10: ease of use, time to completion, elegance of design, and, of course, pre-eminently, on the quality of the ice cream. For the Philly batch, I made a rudimentary cookies and cream. For the French batch, I cooked up a basic cinnamon gelato. I tasted the ice cream thrice—as it came out of the machine (the goop may not be ice cream, but it is irresistible), after it had "ripened," and then again the following night, with wife and friends.

Machines being tested were:

The Rival Treat Shoppe Electric Ice Cream Maker
Cuisinart ICE 20
White Mountain 4-Quart Electric Ice-Cream Maker
Gelato Jr. by Lello
KitchenAid Mixer, Plus Gel Canister Attachment
Cuisinart ICE 50BC Supreme
Musso 4080 Lussino Dessert Maker

See what you think of the results ... do you own any of these?
Does your machine seem to be what it is pictured here?
Does spending a lot ensure fine quality product? Your input, if you will ...
Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"


#48 alchemyst

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Posted 28 June 2005 - 07:30 PM

Did you happen to see the article in Smart Money? They had Ben & Jerry testing and rating ice cream makers. I read the article at a newstand so I don't have the link but it's the most recent issue. They went with the Cuisinart...I own a Smilac myself. It's a bit pricey but worth it if you make ice cream on a regular basis. There's no comparison between those using insulated frozen bowls and those that have a chilling ability within their mechanisms. They ones that chill just work better.
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#49 WhiteTruffleGirl

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Posted 28 June 2005 - 07:38 PM

I also own a Simac and wouldn't trade it for love or money. It's a great machine. As good in small batch as the $30K model I use at work is in large batch.

I'm really looking forward to the gelato class at the World Pastry Forum this Friday!

#50 lesfen

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Posted 28 June 2005 - 07:41 PM

I just got a Cuisinart ICE 20 as a wedding gift and I would agree that it's a great starter model... perfect for me, as I tried it for the first time last night. I'm going to have to play with it for a while before I can make a good call on it. The texture was very nice and the machine is super easy to use... it's the recipe that needs tweaked. I went with the classic custard base and I have to say that it was a little rich for me. If I had made a pie, the recipe that I used would have been a perfect foil for a tart cherry pastry, but I didn't... I just had a big bowl of cool fluffy deliciousness that I couldn't finish. So yeah, big ups to the cheap-y Cuisinart.

#51 kpurvis

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Posted 29 June 2005 - 01:37 PM

I've been considering investing in the KitchenAid attachment. Does anyone have feedback on it?
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#52 Jeni Hicks

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Posted 29 June 2005 - 03:30 PM

I have the KA ice cream maker attachment - and so far I'm very pleased with it :)

Although my ice cream making has been limited to endless batches of vanilla, chocolate and -yum!- fresh strawberry only, the attachment has been a star since the beginning. The ice cream reaches a "slightly stiffer than soft serve" consistency after about 15 minutes - it can be eaten as is, or frozen for a harder consistency. The old Cusinart machine I had rarely got past "cold soup"...the recipes I used were the same.

I'm really happy that I got mine, and would recommend it highly.

HTH!

#53 HungryChris

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Posted 29 June 2005 - 05:25 PM

I have a Musso 4080 Lussino that I got by bidding (and winning) on a Simac on e-bay. How that happened is still a mystery. The thing was delivered brand new with a warranty from a supplier several states away from the woman selling it. My only guess is that the supplier did not have the Simac in stock and made the substitution. Once I did my home-work and realized that it was an upgrade, I stopped my original protest. It had cost me about $320.
As far as the machine goes, my very first batch was just awsome! I love the fact that you can wip out quart after quart at a rate of about 1 every half hour. This was great when I knew my sisters kids were coming over.
I also like to do sorbe and gelato experiments.
Deb (on South Beach) likes to bring over a few 6 oz cups of Blue Bunny Lite 85 fat free, no sugar added yogurt (black cherry is her fave right now) and in about 20 min it produces really good SB friendly frozen yogurt.
My latest gelato was made with 2 peeled large seedless oranges which when run through the blender yielded 1 1/2 C puree. I matched that with 1 1/2 C whole milk, 1/2 Tbs Vanilla extract and 2 heaping Tbs sugar (you have to taste the mixture to see how much sweetness the fruit brings to the table). That was pulsed for a moment and popped into the bowl of the Lussino, which had been running on the refrigerant cycle for about 5 min. I was looking for the Good Humor Creamcicle taste. About 20 min later I had it, soft serve style and the bulk went into the freezer to be hardened off. I could hear the Good Humor bells ringing from my childhood when the truck was really a motorcycle with a big cooler. Next will be the toasted almond!
Let me also add that this thing is a big and heavy item. It will fill both arms and weighs around 30 lbs. I keep it in my spare bedroom/appliance garrage cause I just don't have the space to devote to it when it isn't being used. It is not for everybody.

edited to correct spelling (where is the eG spell-check???)

Cheers,
HC

Edited by HungryChris, 29 June 2005 - 06:37 PM.


#54 kpurvis

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 07:35 AM

I have the KA ice cream maker attachment - and so far I'm very pleased with it :)

Although my ice cream making has been limited to endless batches of vanilla, chocolate and -yum!- fresh strawberry only,  the attachment has been a star since the beginning.  The ice cream reaches a "slightly stiffer than soft serve" consistency after about 15 minutes - it can be eaten as is, or frozen for a harder consistency.  The old Cusinart machine I had rarely got past "cold soup"...the recipes I used were the same.

I'm really happy that I got mine, and would recommend it highly.

HTH!

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Thanks for the report, Jeni. Sounds like it would worth the investment, especially since I have the luxury of a deep freezer for storing the canister.
Kathleen Purvis, food editor, The Charlotte (NC) Observer

#55 Gifted Gourmet

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 07:38 AM

Thanks for this post, kpurvis ... just looked at the prices .. wow! think I'll stick with my Cuisinart for now though ...
Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"


#56 bradyvickers

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 09:47 AM

The raspberry custard turned out great. Very smooth. I have made a few batches in the machine so far. The raspberry custard, coffee ice cream, and a cantaloupe sorbet. The coffee ice cream texture was good, but the flavor wasn't. The texture of the cantaloupe sorbet was bad. I think I needed to strain out the fibrous bits. Anyway, I would highly recommend the KA ice cream attachment it works great.

#57 Lesley C

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 09:55 AM

I'm testing both the KA and Cuisinart makers this week for an article.

The KA was iffy for a few reasons.

One, it doesn't have a lid, which means loss of temperature. It's also not hygenic (but that's the bacteria-crazed ice cream maker in me speaking). There was a fly buzzing around my kitchen when I was churning the ice cream and he came pretty close to melding in alongside the chocolate chips a few times.

Second, I almost broke the paddle when I accidently increased the speed and then went back to the stir speed. I heard a horrible "crunch" noise. Nothing broke, but I think it might if it ever happened again.

Third, the Cuisinart offers the option of having multiple canisters. If I want to make chocolate and vanilla ice cream for a dessert, I have to wait 24 hours with the KA, whereas I can have the second freezer canister going right after the first with the Cuisinart. There's also a Cuisinart model that offers two canisters going at once. With the KA, multiple canisters is not an option and never will be.

Cuisinart test to come soon...

#58 Busboy

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 10:10 AM

I have a Cusinart and I think it works pretty well. And I got it for fifty bucks, with a second cannister thrown in, so I can make multiple 'screams at will.

I think they turn out a pretty good product at a pretty good price.

With the dual cannister Cuisinart, though, I've had trouble with the plastic lids (these things) that hold the paddles in place as the cannisters turn. The little plastic triangles that keep the paddles from spinning have been breaking off one-by-one meaning a $50 machine is rapidly approaching uselessness because of a small plastic part.
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#59 scordelia

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 08:42 PM

I also have the Cuisinart, also got it on sale with a second bowl thrown in, and I love it. It makes great ice cream and it is compact. Recently, a friend of mine (who died) left me his fancy-dancy $1000 Italian ice cream maker with a built-in freezing unit, and I like my Cuisinart better. Thay both make equally good ice cream, but the Cuisinart is easier to clean and store. I am going to sell the other one on eBay or something.
S. Cue


#60 chefturnedbum

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 09:56 PM

Boy I have had a lot of machines over the years. I just got the musso unit and let me tell you, for the money it produces a beautiful product. The air whipped into this unit really makes the difference. I tried the cuisinart and it was ok. In the beginning I used moms whote mt. and rival mixers and they seemed to do just an adequate job as the previous two. The musso is expensive but well worth it and if you have a show kitchen it really stands out. Did a french style with black pepper and vanilla and it was really stellar. Next I did french style with fresh rainier cherries ( I am in WA. ) which I purchased for a buck and barised them in kirsch and paired with a valhrona chocolate ice cream. Orgasm in a bowl. Spend the money.