Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Sous Vide Beets

Modernist

  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Chez56

Chez56
  • participating member
  • 13 posts
  • Location:Nantucket, MA

Posted 22 July 2014 - 09:59 PM

I have been playing around with beets sous vide. I have seen a lot of different times for them ranging from 45 mins at185 f or 85 C I have increased the temp to 188 F and held for one hour dropped it to 187 F for another hour and finished it at 185 F for the last hour and still they are a little too al dente for most peoples taste. This is way beyond the 45 mins I have seen posted for most recipes.

I have peeled and cut the beets into 1/2 inch cubes, heated water on top of the stove and plunged the bags into them before submersing them into the bath and started the original temp in the circulator to about 196 F to adjust for the temp loss when dropping the units in. Not overfilling  the bags, maybe some more than one layer, liquid in bags at about one third volume and still no great results. I usually braise them in a oven, covered in cold liquid for about 3 hours whole beets and they come out tender. Any suggestions?

 

Thank you



#2 boudin noir

boudin noir
  • society donor
  • 106 posts

Posted 23 July 2014 - 03:52 AM

Do them in the oven.
  • liuzhou likes this

#3 weinoo

weinoo
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,552 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 23 July 2014 - 04:01 AM

How big are beets that you braise in the oven for 3 hours?

 

I think you'll have better luck steaming them - it certainly will take a lot less time.


  • liuzhou likes this
Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
mweinstein@eGstaff.org
Tasty Travails - My Blog
My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs
Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

#4 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 5,744 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 23 July 2014 - 05:24 AM

Cuisinart Combi Oven, on the steam-bake setting.



#5 slkinsey

slkinsey
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 11,110 posts
  • Location:New York, New York

Posted 23 July 2014 - 05:31 AM

I have had amazing results with peeled and quartered small golden beets at 85C for an hour with butter. They do have some tooth to them and aren't completely soft, but they are definitely cooked.

What texture are you going for? If you want them just as soft as your three-hour oven braise, I'm not sure what there is to be gained through use of sous vide techniques. Certainly you can't expect a similar level of tenderness after cooking them at a much lower temperature for a shorter period of time. You might consider trying sous vide carrots, which are dead easy and wonderful, to see if the texture of vegetables prepared this way is agreeable to you. One way of describing this style is that it has a slightly toothy texture that would normally go along with "not quite cooked" flavors, except that it tastes fully cooked.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#6 slkinsey

slkinsey
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 11,110 posts
  • Location:New York, New York

Posted 23 July 2014 - 05:38 AM

root vegetables cooking sous vide in butter:

image.jpg

image.jpg

image.jpg
  • scubadoo97, FauxPas and rotuts like this
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#7 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 5,744 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 23 July 2014 - 05:52 AM

inspirational  !



#8 slkinsey

slkinsey
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 11,110 posts
  • Location:New York, New York

Posted 23 July 2014 - 05:59 AM

Those were for a thanksgiving dinner course. The great thing about preparing vegetables this way is that, just as with many proteins, you can chill the bags down in ice water, chuck them in the refrigerator for a few days, and either simply re-therm in a bath or caramelize them in butter for service. I've also experimented to good results with running all the trimmings through the juicer and using that liquid in the bag instead of butter, effectively making "carrots braised in carrot juice," "beets braised in beet juice," etc. Its also possible to, for example, put a little ginger and cumin in the bag for another layer of flavor.

Edited by slkinsey, 23 July 2014 - 06:01 AM.

  • FauxPas likes this
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#9 Chez56

Chez56
  • participating member
  • 13 posts
  • Location:Nantucket, MA

Posted 23 July 2014 - 06:11 AM

The reason behind the Sous Vide Beets is volume, storage, shelf life etc. The amount of liquid required to braise them in the Oven is so much more than sous vide. I'm doing about 30 #s of beets a week and I also make a stock with all of the trimmings, a little orange juice, vinegar, herbs, olive oil etc. and add to the bag. The size i have braised in the past has been tennis ball size. (for Weinoo) It is so nice to ice bath and stack after sous vide and not have to peel, cut, strain each batch. I guess I will go back to the old method.



#10 weinoo

weinoo
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,552 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 23 July 2014 - 08:49 AM

Tennis ball sized beets?!  Those are huge and probably woodier than, say, the beets Sam is cooking above (more like golf ball, I'd guess).


Edited by weinoo, 23 July 2014 - 08:50 AM.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
mweinstein@eGstaff.org
Tasty Travails - My Blog
My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs
Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

#11 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 5,744 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 23 July 2014 - 09:42 AM

made soft-ball size'd beets   cut in 1/2 in the cuisi-SB and they were delicious.

'

woody-ness seems independent of size in my area, you know a 'Woodie' as soon as you cut it in 1/2

 

you toss it.



#12 scubadoo97

scubadoo97
  • participating member
  • 2,112 posts
  • Location:Dunedin, Florida

Posted 23 July 2014 - 04:14 PM

My only experience with SV root vegetables is carrots and fennel. Both retained a lot of intense natural flavors. Beets I think should at least be quartered or they will take for ever to cook through

#13 weedy

weedy
  • participating member
  • 146 posts

Posted 24 July 2014 - 03:55 PM

I know some purists (and phobes) are going to balk at this,

 

but for root veg, I go Voltaggio:

 

vacuumed in the bag with butter; in the microwave.

the precise temp of the immersion circulator simply isn't necessary

 







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Modernist