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Home Coffee Roasting


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#61 slkinsey

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 02:24 PM

Wait a while and get the new Hearthware iRoast. You can change the roast profile, timing, etc. I have never found the Hearthware Precision's small capacity problematic, because I find that I can roast all the beans I use in a typical week in three "sessions" and I prefer to drink coffee from beans <1 week old.
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#62 phaelon56

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 02:46 PM

Getting an electric drum style roaster or an electric fluid bed (aka hot air) roaster will quite possibly add a convenience factor and if you ahve the right model, might let you use a longer roast time, which typically creates a mellower flavor profile. Simple hot air roasters typically have about a f to 6 minute maxiumum roast tiem and deliver a somewhat bright finish to the beans. Some folks prefer this, especially for particular varietals. Others among us prefer the flavor profile less of slower longer roasts, particularly for espresso blends.

Chaff removal is often simplified with commercial home roasting units but if you're satsified with the skillet method, it's not terribly inconvenient for you and the smoke/chaff is not an issue - chances are you wont see significantly better results from other methods.

Soem of the absolute best coffee I have ever consumed was in Ethiopian restaurants when they do the Coffee Ceremony. They typically roast it at the time you order the coffee and do it in a beat up old saucepan on the kitchen stove.

#63 MGLloyd

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 02:52 PM

Read the heatgun/dogbowl coffee roasting primer elsewhere in this forum, or for a version with pictures, go to Heatgun/dogbowl primer. This is an excellent method that you may want to investigate.

Regards,

Michael Lloyd
Mill Creek, Washington USA

#64 bucktown_boffo

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 06:46 PM

consider getting an old popcorn popper. there's a wealth of information online about home roasting with these. i just got one last week and it works great. only certain models are safe for home roasting -- this has to do with the placement of the heating vents so that the chaff doesn't get in and start a fire -- but they are easy to find and buy. there are also modifications you can make to the poppers to improve the quality of the roasting. i got a modified west bend air poppery II off of ebay. definitely cheaper than a gourmet home roaster model!

#65 fresco

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 12:28 AM

Read the heatgun/dogbowl coffee roasting primer elsewhere in this forum, or for a version with pictures, go to Heatgun/dogbowl primer.  This is an excellent method that you may want to investigate.

I have tried the heatgun method after reading about it here, but, and it's probably because of a lack of patience, I found a skillet works better for me.
Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"

#66 BobL

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 04:35 PM

I've been using an Alpenrost for a couple of years now and after the learning curve, I've been roasting a pound or more a week. It's fairly easy to use and clean, the results are very good. The cost is high.

#67 phaelon56

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 09:11 AM

A recent thread discussing the new Hearthware I-Roast had many tangential discussions arising - most of them related to general issues surrounding home roasting of coffee beans.

We have lots of home roasting expertise weighing in on this forum regularly - let's share some ideas, opinions and experiences.

Some worthwhile discussion points, sure to be expanded in this thread, might include:* Why do you roast your own coffee - is it cheaper, better or both?
* What technique or machine is the best or most convenient?
* Where do I get the green coffee beans?
* What about smoke and mess - can I do this indoors?
* Does it take lots of skill and also time to gain enough experience to produce good results?
* My time is valuable (because I'm soooo important :raz: :wink: ) - is it really worth doing?


#68 MGLloyd

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 06:16 PM

* My time is valuable (because I'm soooo  important  :raz:  :wink:  ) - is it really worth doing?

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Yes.

Regards,

Michael Lloyd
Mill Creek, Washington USA

#69 scubadoo97

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 05:11 PM

Why do you roast your own coffee - is it cheaper, better or both? Both

What technique or machine is the best or most convenient? I use a heatgun/bowl method, thanks to MGLloyd and other heatgun mavericks

Where do I get the green coffee beans? There are many green bean sources around. I get my beans from the greencoffeecoop. Good coffee, good selection and good people!

What about smoke and mess - can I do this indoors? unless you have a commercial grade high CFM hood I would do it out doors.

Does it take lots of skill and also time to gain enough experience to produce good results? Anyone can do it. I roast a cup of green beans in about 10 min. and may spend 30-40 min a week on my coffee roasting.

My time is valuable (because I'm soooo important :raz: :wink: ) - is it really worth doing? Only if drinking awesome fresh roasted coffee is important to you.


Just do it!

#70 BrentKulman

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 06:56 PM

My wife is very particular about her AM coffee. Each morning, she grinds her Starbuck's French Roast beans (from Costco) in her Krups Fast Touch Grinder and pours the contents (I'm guessing about 6 teaspoons, but I could be off) into her Bodum french press. Her morning cup is probably about 12 oz.

I have to say that the coffee this produces is extremely muddy and bitter, with a fair amount of sediment at the bottom of the cup. But that's the way she likes it. I have bought her all kinds of beans but nothing satisfies her like Starbuck's French Roast.

I have been reading through the home roasting threads and am interested in buying her a home roasting system for her birthday. But I find myself somewhat confused and concerned that the end result will not be to her liking.

So, given what I have told you about her preferences, should I even consider introducing her to home roasting? If so, what equipment should I get her? From the research I have done, I don't think that French Roast is a type of bean but perhaps it is a style of roasting. Help me understand all this better as I don't generally drink coffee in the morning and this would be entirely her domain.

#71 hopkin

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 02:08 AM

Start by finding some better beans. From what you are using now it can only get better. Way better. Find a local roaster and get some fresh roasted beans.

French Roast is roast colour. Very dark "roasted" flavour, all of the more subtle "coffee" flavour have been roasted out. Try a medium-dark roast.

Then concentrate on brewing. press pot? coffeegeek guide to french press. your coffee will be very pleasant and aromatic, no bitterness. You might even like it.
Alistair Durie
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#72 bigbear

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 06:00 AM

At the risk of ruining a birthday surprise, I would ask her if she is interested in trying the home roasting process and all it entails. You could wind up with another appliance, in a cardboard box, in a cabinet, somewhere.

-- Jeff

"I don't care to belong to a club that accepts people like me as members." -- Groucho Marx


#73 Abra

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Posted 21 January 2005 - 12:05 PM

We have a Fresh Roast from Sweet Maria's and like it a lot. It makes small batches, so you can do a lot of experimenting. Their green beans are super, too. One caution is that you either have to roast outdoors, or under a really good kitchen hood, as it creates a lot of smoke. But if that's no problem, roast on!

#74 missmaia

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Posted 07 February 2005 - 07:44 PM

My wife is very particular about her AM coffee.  I have to say that the coffee this produces is extremely muddy and bitter, with a fair amount of sediment at the bottom of the cup.  But that's the way she likes it.  I have bought her all kinds of beans but nothing satisfies her like Starbuck's French Roast.

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Having said this, I think she may be pretty happy with what she likes. Instead of buying her a biggish appliance that *will* create a lot of smoke and carbon (being as French and Italian ~ the roast colors~ are as dark as it gets) why don't you instead cater to her likes? I'd start with a fancy new press ( I think Bonjour makes a nifty copper one), or maybe cup and saucer set with a tray, so she can carry it into whichever room she likes to take her coffee. While you're at it, you could also include a gift certificate to a local roastery/cafe... maybe she'll find another kind of coffee she likes that's local. :rolleyes:

#75 Merritt

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 07:19 PM

We have a Fresh Roast from Sweet Maria's and like it a lot.  It makes small batches, so you can do a lot of experimenting.  Their green beans are super, too.  One caution is that you either have to roast outdoors, or under a really good kitchen hood, as it creates a lot of smoke.  But if that's no problem, roast on!

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Can you recomend a specific model? I was on their website and I found quite a lot to choose from. I am interested in small amount roasting...roast the day-before for the next day, etc.

Thanks in adavance for any help.
"Let me in! I am starving!" - Augustus Gloop, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

#76 SWISS_CHEF

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Posted 06 March 2005 - 10:33 AM

At the risk of sounding like a hillbilly here is how I do it:
I have an outdoor gas grill with a side burner...I get out my big Calphalon soup pot and dump in about two pounds of green beans that I buy from a local roaster. You can try different kinds but Sumatra works well. It's really more to do with the roast than the bean. Turn up the heat and stir them with a wooden spoon every 10 to 15 seconds untill they turn black and start popping like popcorn. Let them pop untill they start to slow down. They will be smoking like crazy so be sure to do this outside!!! You will need a glove to protect your hand from the heat. When they look black and glossy dump the beans on to a couple of cookie sheets to cool quickly. When totally cool put them into a jar and let them sit for 3 days so the oils can re-absorb into the beans. Then grind as normal. I prefer these beans to any store bought beans.

Note: This recipe will take the beans to a very dark french or expresso style roast. Caffine will be largely burned off. Pull them off earlier if you want a lighter roast.

PS: Wear old cloths because they will stink when you are done!

Edited by SWISS_CHEF, 06 March 2005 - 10:37 AM.


#77 jayt90

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Posted 07 March 2005 - 09:00 AM

Turn up the heat and stir them with a wooden spoon every 10 to 15 seconds untill they turn black and start popping like popcorn. Let them pop untill they start to slow down. 


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Some years ago I was able to get green beans at a Saturday market regularly.
I could roast a few in a very hot cast iron pan, keeping them moving constantly. Then I heard about using a hot air popcorn maker. The bean seller scoffed, and said I would soon burn it out, But I persisted, and it provided an excellent source of fresh beans for the three years I used it, until I moved out to the burbs.
It is not as consistent or even as fast as a small store roaster, but it is better than buying quickly fading roasted beans, which is now my current option.

#78 SWISS_CHEF

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Posted 07 March 2005 - 11:00 AM

Turn up the heat and stir them with a wooden spoon every 10 to 15 seconds untill they turn black and start popping like popcorn. Let them pop untill they start to slow down. 


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Some years ago I was able to get green beans at a Saturday market regularly.
I could roast a few in a very hot cast iron pan, keeping them moving constantly. Then I heard about using a hot air popcorn maker. The bean seller scoffed, and said I would soon burn it out, But I persisted, and it provided an excellent source of fresh beans for the three years I used it, until I moved out to the burbs.
It is not as consistent or even as fast as a small store roaster, but it is better than buying quickly fading roasted beans, which is now my current option.

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Bravo, Bravo!!!
I just love unconventional methods…I am sick to death of doing things like everyone else.

#79 jayt90

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Posted 07 March 2005 - 11:21 AM

Thanks, Chef 'Hillbilly'!

#80 SWISS_CHEF

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Posted 07 March 2005 - 12:29 PM

Thanks, Chef 'Hillbilly'!

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I rekon we kin start a swappin 'possium recipes now!

#81 jayt90

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Posted 08 March 2005 - 08:48 AM

Thanks, Chef 'Hillbilly'!

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I rekon we kin start a swappin 'possium recipes now!

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Good idea! I have even seen some o'possum roadkill here in southwestern Ontario. I'll bet it tastes like chicken!

#82 SWISS_CHEF

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Posted 08 March 2005 - 09:01 AM

Here you go Cuzzin!
http://www.aaa-recip...m/opossum1.html
http://www.gamecalls...sumrecipes.html
http://www.recipezaar.com/107969

YeeHaw! :laugh:

#83 phaelon56

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Posted 08 March 2005 - 10:06 AM

Then I heard about using a hot air popcorn maker. The bean seller scoffed, and said I would soon burn it out, But I persisted, and it provided an excellent source of fresh beans for the three years I used it, until I moved out to the burbs.


It's important to stick to the right type of popcorn popper if using it for coffee bean roasting. The original West Bend Poppery and the Poppery II are ideal because of the pattern of agitation and bean rotation.

#84 jayt90

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 08:32 AM

Then I heard about using a hot air popcorn maker. The bean seller scoffed, and said I would soon burn it out, But I persisted, and it provided an excellent source of fresh beans for the three years I used it, until I moved out to the burbs.


It's important to stick to the right type of popcorn popper if using it for coffee bean roasting. The original West Bend Poppery and the Poppery II are ideal because of the pattern of agitation and bean rotation.

View Post

Thanks. I think it was West Bend, but it is long gone now. All I remember is a small bin, like a sour glass, and the beans moving clockwise.

#85 cstuart

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 11:38 AM

Then I heard about using a hot air popcorn maker. The bean seller scoffed, and said I would soon burn it out, But I persisted, and it provided an excellent source of fresh beans for the three years I used it, until I moved out to the burbs.


It's important to stick to the right type of popcorn popper if using it for coffee bean roasting. The original West Bend Poppery and the Poppery II are ideal because of the pattern of agitation and bean rotation.

View Post

Thanks. I think it was West Bend, but it is long gone now. All I remember is a small bin, like a sour glass, and the beans moving clockwise.

View Post

I have a WestBend Poppery II which I took apart and disabled the two overheating protection features. Now I can roast to a nice espresso in about 10 minutes.
Check out this computer controlled coffee roaster that some guy made out of a Poppery.

#86 phaelon56

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 12:29 PM

It's also worth noting that the most commonly perceived shortcoming of hot air roasting (too bright a flavor profile due to very short roast time) can be almost entirely mitigated by doing some hacks that allow the fan and het to be cycled on and off indepedently of one another. You can also buy a heavy duty voltage regulator (aka Variac) for about $80 - $100 but some of us aren't into hacks etc.

By the time you spend that kind of money it might make more sense to buy a dedicated roasting device such as the one discussed in this

Hearthware i-Roast thread

#87 maher

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Posted 12 March 2005 - 01:14 AM

i would try some home roast or at least a fresh roast from a local roaster before making the purchase.

i have been using an old very heavy cast iron skillet to roast at home for a couple of years, and i have had great results, all it takes is a stir every minute or so for ten minutes total, and you end up with fantastic coffee. There is something to the open skillet and working withthe beans as they change that appeals to me as well.

as noted by others you need to either do this near a window, or outdoors as there will be smoke!! but there will also be the smell of heaven for a coffee lover that lingers in the house overnight

#88 flacoman

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 07:25 AM

Darn you all! I follwed this thread over to the other sites , then to Sweet Maria's ,now the co-op and now I have 25 pounds of beans binned up! :blink:

#89 MGLloyd

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 08:14 AM

When you want to start roasting in quantity, don't forget the heatgun/dogbowl method: http://www.homeroast...om/heatgun.html

Regards,

Michael Lloyd
Mill Creek, Washington USA

#90 sazji

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 10:54 AM

Tired of the boring coffee I get here (I live firmly within the Nescafe Belt), and unable to pay the prices Gloria Jeans and Voldemor...um...I mean Starbucks demands for coffee beans, I decided to try roasting at home. I got 500 grams of beans from another chain here, "Coffee World." I don't really know much about their beans; they say they are arabica, their roasts are all medium brown (no shiny beans there) and they also sell flavored coffees... Mostly I find their coffee uninspiring to say the least but figured why not try it.


I tried about 3/4 cup of beans, I used a small heavy cast iron pan on the stove, windows wide open, kept the beans moving, and brought them to a shiny dark brown in about 20 minutes. I did hear cracking; earlier on just one or two here and there, then as it got darker, an almost constant cracking. I took it off as soon as that was done.

What I got was basically like not very good Folgers, and when I drank it I felt more jittery than I had in a long time, making me wonder if what I got was even arabica.

What do y'all think? I have seen some people talk about doing it in 10 minutes. Is it better to do it fast, or slow, or does it make any difference? Or did the Folgeresque aroma come from the quality of the beans?
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