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Dandelion Tops Edible?


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15 replies to this topic

#1 Paul Bacino

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 01:36 PM

I did a search.. but just came up with " Dandelion Greens "

 

What of the tops?  Someone told me to fry them like mushrooms?

 

Interesting..  Thoughts on usage.. no wine .. not happening

 

Paul


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#2 annabelle

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 01:40 PM

You can ferment the flowers and make wine and that's about it as far as I know.

 

I can't imagine they are tasty cooked alone or tossed in salad.


Edited by annabelle, 04 May 2014 - 01:45 PM.


#3 heidih

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 01:56 PM

Having trouble picturing "tops" that are not "greens" - can you explain?



#4 gfron1

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 01:58 PM

You mean the flower I assume.  I have used those on my food - slightly sweet taste.


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#5 Anna N

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 03:13 PM

Aren't they a diuretic?
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#6 Paul Bacino

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 03:23 PM

The yellow flowers...yes
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#7 Anna N

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 03:31 PM

The yellow flowers...yes


Are they not what you mean by the tops?
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#8 Paul Bacino

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 03:37 PM

Yes..
The flower

Edited by Paul Bacino, 04 May 2014 - 03:37 PM.

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#9 TheCulinaryLibrary

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 06:31 AM

DANDELION ................................................................... Taraxacum officinale. Native to North America and Eurasia, all parts of the dandelion plant are edible. The flowers comprise multiple small florets held aloft on a composite flower head. This mighty flower is a power pack of nutrients including Vitamins A, C and K. They go well in salads and  match well with blue flowers such as Borage or Chicory.

"Edible Flowers & Leaves", The Culinary Library, Vol.2. Pub. Amazon 2013. D & P Gramp.


Edited by TheCulinaryLibrary, 12 May 2014 - 06:37 AM.


#10 SobaAddict70

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 07:37 AM

you have to be careful if you use them, that they weren't sprayed with pesticides or herbicides.

they're great as tempura, so I've heard.

#11 andiesenji

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 11:20 AM

I grow the "French" dandelions that have much longer and more tender leaves.  And they are slower to "bolt" or produce flowers, even in the heat of the desert, than ordinary dandelions.  They have a pretty blue flower that is also edible - slightly sweet. 

 

They are very tasty in salads, as cooked greens and they make a nice decorative container plant.  Some of the leaves will grow to two feet - although I pick them at about a foot long. 

They are easy to grow in almost any soil and once you have them, you can save the seeds for future generations.

 

The roots have long been used as a safe diuretic as the compounds do not cause loss of potassium as other diuretics do. 

 

Seeds


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#12 sparrowgrass

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 07:21 AM

You can dip the blossoms in batter and fry.  Sprinkle with powdered sugar.


sparrowgrass

#13 Smithy

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 09:50 AM

I just heard about a new use for dandelion petals in today's episode of The Splendid Table: Dandelion Petal Sorbet.  

 

The link above goes to the recipe posted on The Splendid Table's web site.  The recipe is adapted from The Herb Farm Cookbook, by Jerry Traunfeld.


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#14 Norm Matthews

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 10:57 AM

Many years ago I had a book by Euell Gibbons who was a proponent of natural diets. If I recall correctly, he said that the young dandelion leaves were edible and I think he said the roots could be roasted, ground and used as a substitute for coffee.  I think I have a recipe around here somewhere for dandelion flower wine. 

 

edit PS: I could probably make around 5 gallons of wine from my neighbors dandelions. :)


Edited by Norm Matthews, 01 June 2014 - 11:00 AM.

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#15 andiesenji

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 03:09 PM

I think I have all of Euell Gibbons books.  In the early '70s I took the kids on a couple of "wild foraging" hikes led by a young man, a Native American, in the hills above the San Gabriel valley.

He mentioned that man that he considered a wild-foods "hero" -  Euell Gibbons - was going to be given a talk at Pasadena City college the following month so a friend and I attended.

He was a good speaker, interspersing humorous stories in with his factual accounts and observations.  That prompted me to buy the books then in print - and later his last book, published after he died suddenly. 

It reminded me of the many "wild" foods that were gathered when I was a child as western Kentucky abounds with many fine wild or semi-wild edibles. 


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#16 heidih

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 03:29 PM

Mr. Gibbons was particularly fond of nice fat dandelion crowns - boiled. The section between the tapering root and the foliage.