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Homemade Marshmallow Recipes & Tips (Part 2)

Confections

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442 replies to this topic

#421 Mjx

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Posted 20 October 2011 - 12:22 AM

So I've become somewhat obsessed with making marshmallows. This thread made me really happy to find, but I'm curious - has anyone figured out good uses for failed mallows? I tried some bourbon marshmallows but they messed with the gelatin so they never whipped up.

I'd hate to toss the batch out, but does anyone have tips on reusing the failed marshmallows? And on that note, does anyone have a good alcoholic marshmmallow technique/recipe?


At the risk of sounding obvious, how would your failed marshmallows be as a topping for, say, a very dark, dense chocolate/spiced cake or similar dessert, such as bread pudding? The bourbon sounds like it might just make it perfect for the job, and you could tweak it, if you feel it isn't quite dimensional enough as is.

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#422 patris

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Posted 20 October 2011 - 05:05 AM

Melt them with some butter and make upmarket rice cereal treats?
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#423 Natalie Suwanprakorn

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 07:09 PM

Hi!
This is just what I'm looking for -- when do you add the inclusions of nuts, etc? At the end of the whipping?

Thanks,
Natalie

#424 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 09:14 PM

You can easily add a bit of alcohol right at the end.
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#425 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 09:15 PM

Hi Patty! Have you had success making rice krispie treats with homemade marshmallows? I found the moisture content was too high and they tasted stale very quickly.
Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

#426 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 09:16 PM

Hi!
This is just what I'm looking for -- when do you add the inclusions of nuts, etc? At the end of the whipping?

Thanks,
Natalie

Yes, right at the end. Mix just enough to evenly distribute.
Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

#427 dhardy123

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 11:19 AM

Have you had success making rice krispie treats with homemade marshmallows? I found the moisture content was too high and they tasted stale very quickly.



While its not marshmallows per se, the "Baked" guys do a rice krispie treat using sugar, water and corn syrup that works just like marshmallow sticking the rice krispies together

#428 JeanneCake

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 09:02 AM

I've only ever used this recipe to spread in a pan and let set up overnight, and cut into squares or shapes.

I saw a marshmallow twist pop on Facebook and I want to replicate it. It looked as if the marshmallow was piped in straight rows on a silpat (alternating colors or flavors) and then when set, twisted around a lollipop stick. The rows were an even thickness, which makes me think that they used a large, open tip (e.g., an Ateco 8 or 9 maybe) to pipe them

Is it really just that easy? It is so sticky after beating it, that I cannot imagine being able to wrestle it into a pastry bag and then piping it out. Has anyone done this? Is there something different you have to do to the recipe, or will it work to pipe without any adjustments?

ETA: correct typos

Edited by JeanneCake, 23 January 2012 - 09:02 AM.


#429 Darienne

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 01:59 PM

I have this vague memory from a couple of years ago when confectionery partner Barbara and I made green marshmallow lollipops for St. Patrick's and after the main slab had been cut out and assembled, Barbara took the slightly raggy cut-off ends and wrapped them around the sticks. It worked quite well.

(That was in my marshmallow craze period. :raz: )
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#430 gap

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 08:35 PM

Is it really just that easy? It is so sticky after beating it, that I cannot imagine being able to wrestle it into a pastry bag and then piping it out. Has anyone done this? Is there something different you have to do to the recipe, or will it work to pipe without any adjustments?


A trick we used was to make a tube of baking paper (non stick type) around, say, a wooden spoon handle and sticky-tape it together so it stays in a tube shape. Then pipe the marshmallow into that, let it set and remove the baking paper.

#431 cookingofjoy

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 11:03 PM

I've not ever made a marshmallow pop, but I did do little rabbit "peeps", and piping a line should be fine. The peeps were a little bit of a pain for the ears and tail, but piping a line would be no problem. I did need a fairly firm marshmallow, though. My first try using a Martha Stewart recipe for piping wasn't quite firm enough and my rabbits flattened into little trilobites :) The second go around, I used nightscotsman's and it worked great!

#432 tikidoc

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 05:53 AM

I've only ever made marshmallows in pans but I remember seeing a Good Eats episode on marshmallows when Browm piped them in rows, then snipped them with scissors to make mini marshmallows for use in hot drinks and it did not look hard. As I remember, he used a ziplock bag with the tip cut off, and even with, that they looked pretty even. I would expect someone good with a piping bag could make them very even.

#433 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 04:58 PM

How fun. Thirty-five pages of marshmallow discussion; I had no idea until recently when I made a batch of French vanilla ice cream and ended up with leftover egg whites. I decided to make marshmallows and found this thread. I used this recipe from David Lebovitz.

It went quite well but the marshmallows were a little sticky at the end of the process and it got worse with the heat and humidity we've experienced this weekend in San Diego. It's possible that I did not whip the mixture long enough at step number 6. In any case, they were delicious little clouds!
The recipe yielded exactly a 1/4 sheet pan.

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#434 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 23 September 2012 - 11:29 PM

Cranberry marshmallows have me stumped and I'm wondering if someone can please help? As someone mentioned above, if you replace the puree/water amounts with straight cranberry puree in NS's recipe they turn out a bit like taffy. They do turn out if you use say 2/3's puree and 1/3 water but I was hoping to pump up the flavour. Apparently cranberries have a lot of natural pectin like apples so I guess that's affecting the gelatin. Do I use way less gelatin, more gelatin or deal with a milder flavour by using more water/less puree?
Thoughts?
Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

#435 pjm333

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 07:42 AM

You can use any puree (raspberry, passion etc) in this recipe. Spray 1 flat sheet pan with non stick spray and add parchment and spray again.

2 CUPS PUREE
24 GELATIN SHEETS/SOFTENED
1 1/2 CUPS WATER
6 CUPS SUGAR
2 1/2 CUPS LIGHT CORN SYRUP
MIX THE PUREE AND GELATIN IN A 20 QT MIXING BOWL, COOK WATER,SUGAR AND CORN SYRUP TO 235 DEGREES AND ADD TO PUREE & GELATIN MIX. BEAT AT HIGH SPEED UNTIL VERY THICK, ABOUT 10 MINUTES. YOU CANNOT OVER BEAT THIS RECIPE. ADD TO SHEET PAN AND CHILL 2 TO 3 HRS. CUT INTO DESIRED SHAPE AND ROLL IN SIFTED 10X AND LET AIR DRY AT ROOM TEMP ABOUT 24 HRS.

#436 MelissaH

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 03:32 PM

I've made a few different marshmallow formulas over the years, and have come to the conclusion that I strongly prefer the recipes without egg whites. (This didn't come as a huge surprise to me, as generally speaking, I'm not a huge fan of anything with uncooked egg whites, meringue pie toppings or meringue cookies included.)

Without looking through all 35 pages, does anyone know what the egg white does, that so many recipes include it?

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#437 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 04:51 PM

Melissa, I was recently reading this article and he talks about the addition of egg whites. http://www.eatthelov...e-marshmallows/
Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

#438 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 04:53 PM

I've made a few different marshmallow formulas over the years, and have come to the conclusion that I strongly prefer the recipes without egg whites. (This didn't come as a huge surprise to me, as generally speaking, I'm not a huge fan of anything with uncooked egg whites, meringue pie toppings or meringue cookies included.)

Without looking through all 35 pages, does anyone know what the egg white does, that so many recipes include it?

MelissaH

I am guessing texture. The ones I just made with egg whites were very fluffy and delicate. I am not sure that you could achieve the same texture without egg whites.

#439 xxchef

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 12:47 PM

Some of my marshmallows are turning grainy after a few weeks. Is this "normal"? or cause?

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#440 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 05:20 PM

xxchef it's normal for them to turn grainy after some time. You can slow down the process by making sure they are stored airtight at cool room temperature in a dry location. It's the sugar re-crystallizing. They should still taste good melted. :)
Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

#441 Cassie

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 06:51 AM

I have made a lot of different marshmallow recipes. I recently made chocolate malt marshmallows which taste great, but they are gummy. What causes gumminess in marshmallows--too much corn syrup maybe?

Edited by Cassie, 13 November 2012 - 06:52 AM.


#442 Tri2Cook

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 03:00 PM

I have made a lot of different marshmallow recipes. I recently made chocolate malt marshmallows which taste great, but they are gummy. What causes gumminess in marshmallows--too much corn syrup maybe?


I don't know what your recipe uses as the chocolate component but it's been my experience that any ingredient that introduces fat to the formula messes with the texture resulting in a denser, less aerated marshmallow with a texture that could easily be interpreted as gummy. Chocolate, cocoa, peanut butter, coconut milk and spray dried coconut milk powder all had that effect on marshmallows I've made. I've never been able to get a marshmallow with the traditional texture when including a fat-containing ingredient. The taste was fine, the texture not so much.
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#443 Cassie

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 07:09 AM

I am also wondering if the powdered ingredients prevent aeration and give the rubbery texture. I make a sweet potato/curry marshmallow and it seemed that the ones that had more curry in them were tougher. I am going to try adding the cocoa-malt slurry to the syrup before adding it to the gelatin. I had the same problem when I used coconut puree to soften the gelatin--very tasty, but tough





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