Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

What to do with Delicious apples?


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 abadoozy

abadoozy
  • participating member
  • 243 posts
  • Location:da UP, eh

Posted 31 July 2012 - 12:26 PM

The previous owner of my house planted a Delicious Apple tree in the front yard. Over the past few years, it's matured, and I've had a bumper crop of Delicious apples every fall. This year looks like it may turn out to be the biggest ever.

Every time I look at that tree, I get mad.

Who in their right mind plants a DELICIOUS APPLE tree?!? Those apples are absolutely not delicious. Now, granted, the ones off the tree are better than the ones you buy in the store, but they're still watery, bland, thick-skinned, and coarse-textured. I usually pick one every fall, take a bite, throw it away and curse whoever planted that tree. It'd be one thing if it was just a pretty ornamental tree that never produced. But having it be so bountiful in my yard - the yard that refuses to cough up decent tomatoes or basil or anything else I like - just pisses me off.

OK, rant done. <whew> that made me feel better. Back to the original question: Is there anything I can do with these awful fruits beyond letting the deer eat them?

#2 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 2,812 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 31 July 2012 - 12:41 PM

The previous owner of my house planted a Delicious Apple tree in the front yard. Over the past few years, it's matured, and I've had a bumper crop of Delicious apples every fall. This year looks like it may turn out to be the biggest ever.

Every time I look at that tree, I get mad.

Who in their right mind plants a DELICIOUS APPLE tree?!? Those apples are absolutely not delicious. Now, granted, the ones off the tree are better than the ones you buy in the store, but they're still watery, bland, thick-skinned, and coarse-textured. I usually pick one every fall, take a bite, throw it away and curse whoever planted that tree. It'd be one thing if it was just a pretty ornamental tree that never produced. But having it be so bountiful in my yard - the yard that refuses to cough up decent tomatoes or basil or anything else I like - just pisses me off.

OK, rant done. <whew> that made me feel better. Back to the original question: Is there anything I can do with these awful fruits beyond letting the deer eat them?


What kind are these? Golden or red delicious? My mom used to make a nice apple tart with golden delicious apples.

#3 abadoozy

abadoozy
  • participating member
  • 243 posts
  • Location:da UP, eh

Posted 31 July 2012 - 12:50 PM

Red delicious, sorry. Yes, I like the Goldens better as well - they have some tartness to them. These are not very tart at all.

#4 baroness

baroness
  • participating member
  • 880 posts
  • Location:New York City

Posted 31 July 2012 - 01:09 PM

Donate them to a soup kitchen, or the like. Any fresh fruit is appreciated.

#5 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,644 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 31 July 2012 - 01:51 PM

If you can't donate them...some places you can't...what about juicing them? Then you can freeze the juice and drink it forever.

We did that last year, although it was from wonderful Mac and Northern Spy trees mixed. (sorry).
Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#6 weinoo

weinoo
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,397 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 31 July 2012 - 02:25 PM

Yeah, I'd juice 'em, make sorbets, make applesauce, make jam....that way, you can at least spice 'em up to your liking.
Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
mweinstein@eGstaff.org
Tasty Travails - My Blog
My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs
Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

#7 Emily_R

Emily_R
  • participating member
  • 881 posts

Posted 31 July 2012 - 03:30 PM

Another vote here for applesauce, which at least minimizes their mealy texture. Though my real recommendation is: chop it down and plant a better variety of apple tree!

#8 Lisa Shock

Lisa Shock
  • society donor
  • 2,071 posts
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ

Posted 31 July 2012 - 08:12 PM

I second chopping it down. Every year you wait is a year that a better tree could be growing.

That said, juice is good, apple jelly might be ok if you're willing to spike it with some herbs to boost flavor.

#9 lesliec

lesliec
  • host
  • 1,021 posts
  • Location:Wellington, New Zealand

Posted 31 July 2012 - 08:25 PM

Hey guys, easy on the chopping down stuff - there's clearly some good roots there, so how about grafting? And don't stick with one variety; there's no reason you can't graft two or three onto a single stump to give you both some variety and an extended harvest season.

Having said that, I wonder if you're not letting them get too ripe (yes, it's possible). I haven't had a red delicious for a while, but I do remember there's a short window to get them at their best. Once they tip over, they get the kind of mushy texture you seem to be experiencing. Before that, they can be wonderful.

Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory


#10 Mjx

Mjx

    Senior Host

  • host
  • 6,102 posts

Posted 31 July 2012 - 11:37 PM

Hey guys, easy on the chopping down stuff - there's clearly some good roots there, so how about grafting? And don't stick with one variety; there's no reason you can't graft two or three onto a single stump to give you both some variety and an extended harvest season.


My though,t too: my boyfriend's mother has several heirloom varieties grafted onto one of the original trees on the garden, and it's been quite successful. Seems a shame to chop down a tree that is probaly at least good for shade.

Having said that, I wonder if you're not letting them get too ripe (yes, it's possible). I haven't had a red delicious for a while, but I do remember there's a short window to get them at their best. Once they tip over, they get the kind of mushy texture you seem to be experiencing. Before that, they can be wonderful.


Another vote for applesauce (or, I don't know, how well do they dry?). I don't think I've ever bitten into a Red Delicious apple that hasn't been disappointing, and have always assumed they were a hybrid designed to stock supermarkets.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Senior Host, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org


#11 Lisa Shock

Lisa Shock
  • society donor
  • 2,071 posts
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ

Posted 01 August 2012 - 09:45 AM

You can also make a few things with the apples when they are still green. Some people say that applesauce is better made with unripe apples. You can also extract your own pectin, and make a mock crab-apple jelly.

#12 HungryC

HungryC
  • participating member
  • 1,497 posts
  • Location:greater New Orleans

Posted 01 August 2012 - 09:53 AM

Hey guys, easy on the chopping down stuff - there's clearly some good roots there, so how about grafting? And don't stick with one variety; there's no reason you can't graft two or three onto a single stump to give you both some variety and an extended harvest season.

My thoughts exactly--call your local county extension agent and ask for a referral to a fruit grower or nursery that handles fruit trees. You can graft a variety you really like onto that mature, productive tree.

#13 FoodMan

FoodMan
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,315 posts

Posted 02 August 2012 - 10:40 AM

I'm reading Sandor Katz's wonderful The Art of Fermentation book, so I would definitely try my hand at juicing and fermenting the juice as he recommends to make cider or even mix it with honey for mead.

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com


#14 abadoozy

abadoozy
  • participating member
  • 243 posts
  • Location:da UP, eh

Posted 03 August 2012 - 09:25 AM

Thanks for all the replies!

I'm not going to juice them because I don't really drink juice or cider. Not that I don't like them - especially cider - but it's just not a big part of my diet.

Applesauce: Yeah, probably could do that. But when my choice is applesauce from the local Honeycrisps which make excellent applesauce with next to no additions, or applesauce from my flavorless apples, I'm going for the Honeycrisps.

Gratfing: now there's an idea! I have no idea how to go about finding someone to do that, though. I guess I'll start looking. Thanks!