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Peanut Butter Cookies - Bake-Off XIII


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60 replies to this topic

#31 pastrygirl

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 07:05 PM

Aw, shucks, guys. I might have to try the spicy oatmeal raisin, but then we already have spicy brownies, don't want to go overboard on the spicy pastry! Here's the recipe for the nuts, the cookie dough recipe we use came from Gourmet or Bon Appetit but has been modified for high altitude, so I won't post that part (too lazy to figure out recipegullet right now, and too lazy to convert back to sea level and/or ounces):

Spicy Peanuts for PB Cookies

peanuts 200 g
salt 1 tsp
chilli powder 1 tsp
sugar 2 TB


Fry the peanuts in hot oil (180C/360F) until the nuts are lightly browned, then drain
them on paper towels.

Put the salt, chilli, and sugar in a bowl, add the hot peanuts, and toss to coat.

Heat a small frying pan over medium high heat. Add the peanuts and spices and
cook, stirring, just until the sugar melts. Immediately pour the nuts back into
the bowl and let cool.


******

I'm sure you could just toast the peanuts (maybe with a light coating of oil?) instead of deep frying them, but the peanuts we get here are not great and seem to magically improve in the fryer. For non-metric users, 200 g is 7 ounces or about a cup and a quarter of peanuts.

Enjoy!

#32 emmalish

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 08:13 PM

I made Dorie Greenspan's Peanut Butter Crisscrosses this weekend (mentioned upthread).

Posted Image

Edited by emmalish, 22 April 2008 - 10:33 PM.

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?


#33 Bruiser

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 09:48 PM

Has anyone else made Pichet Ong's Peanut Butter Cookies from his cookbook?

They are unreal.

He uses brown butter in them, and sprinkles sea salt on top and it makes such a difference.

I'm making some tonight, so I will post a picture tomorrow.

Edited by Bruiser, 25 April 2008 - 09:48 PM.


#34 gfron1

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 10:51 AM

Bruiser nudged me enough to make Ong's PB cookies last night as well. I ate one yesterday fresh from the oven, and one this morning for breakfast. They were really good, but I preferred fresh from the oven 10 times more than the day after. Also, I used Maldon instead of Fleur de Sel, which Ong said was an acceptable substitution. I'd like to try them with the Balinese salt pyramids some time for extra textural punch.

This is the second browned butter recipe I've made lately (Paul Raphael's ccc in RecipeGullet), and I like that addition, but I have to eat more than one cookie to appreciate it. The first cookie is my scarf cookie which doesn't get tasted, and the second one gets enjoyed.

PS - no pics...they looked like cookies, except really big!

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#35 Lisa2k

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 11:38 AM

Bruiser nudged me enough to make Ong's PB cookies last night as well.  I ate one yesterday fresh from the oven, and one this morning for breakfast.  They were really good, but I preferred fresh from the oven 10 times more than the day after.   Also, I used Maldon instead of Fleur de Sel, which Ong said was an acceptable substitution.  I'd like to try them with the Balinese salt pyramids some time for extra textural punch.

This is the second browned butter recipe I've made lately (Paul Raphael's ccc in RecipeGullet), and I like that addition, but I have to eat more than one cookie to appreciate it.  The first cookie is my scarf cookie which doesn't get tasted, and the second one gets enjoyed.

PS - no pics...they looked like cookies, except really big!

View Post


PS - no pics...they looked like cookies, except really big!

LOL!! I just spewed diet coke all over my screen. Funny!!

That said, Has anyone tried the actual Bouchon Bakery Nutter Butter cookie recipe? Like I said above, I always use their filling to sandwich some of my peanut butter cookies, but the recipe for their cookie contains 1 lb of butter compared to the rest of the 'basic amount' of ingredients, which is 'obviously' a lot! Now, don't get me wrong, I love butter, and I don't skimp, but I was just curious if these cookies were worth 1 whole lb of butter, and how they came out (??).

Edited by Lisa2k, 28 April 2008 - 11:39 AM.

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#36 bburdulis

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Posted 30 April 2008 - 05:26 PM

What is the recipe for the filling in Bouchon Bakery's Nutter Butters?

#37 Lisa2k

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Posted 30 April 2008 - 05:43 PM

What is the recipe for the filling in Bouchon Bakery's Nutter Butters?

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Here's the whole recipe in case someone wants to try the cookie part along with the filling.

Ingredients:
***Cookie Dough***
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
4 teaspoons baking soda
1 pound butter -- at room temperature
2/3 cup creamy peanut butter
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
2 large eggs
1 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/3 cup coarsely chopped peanuts
2 1/2 cups quick-cooking oats

***Filling***
4 ounces butter -- at room temperature
1/2 cup creamy peanut butter
1 2/3 cup confectioners sugar

Directions:

For the cookie dough: Oven to 350. Mix together flour, baking powder and baking soda; set aside. Using a mixer with a paddle attachment, cream together the butter and peanut butter. Add sugars and beat at medium speed for 4 minutes, scraping bowl twice.

At low speed, add eggs and vanilla. Add flour mixture and beat on low until well mixed, frequently scraping bowl. Add peanuts and oats. Using an ice cream scoop, place balls of dough on parchment-lined baking sheets at least three inches apart. Bake until cookies have spread and turned very light golden brown, about 10 minutes. Remove from oven and cool 5 to 10 minutes. Transfer to a rack to cool completely before filling.

For the filling: Cream the butter, peanut butter and confectioners sugar until very smooth.
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#38 Pille

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Posted 02 May 2008 - 05:21 AM

Peanut butter is something you must grow up with in order to appreciate it fully. It wasn't available behind the Iron Curtain :biggrin: and it's definitely not something I would by regularly. Hmmm. I think the only time ever I did buy a jar of peanut butter was few years ago to make these peanut butter cookies (a cup of sugar, a cup of good-quality crunchy peanut butter, 1 egg - that's it). They were quite tasty, to be honest, but I still haven't joined a Peanut Butter (Cookie) Appreciation Society (if there exists one).

:raz:

#39 helenjp

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Posted 02 May 2008 - 07:25 AM

A Japanese recipe for peanut butter cookies included a generous amount of lemon zest. If you're a peanut butter cookie fence-sitter, it makes all the difference!

#40 Mary Elizabeth

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Posted 21 May 2008 - 11:36 AM

Lisa2k,

I made the Boucheron nutter butter cookies, with their cream filling. The cookies spread and flatten to about 3-4 inches wide, 1/4 inch thick. When cool they are very rubbery, and stay that way for 3-4 days. They fall apart when you bite into them, so they don't squish the cream, which is very soft, out the sides. They would make good ice cream sandwich cookies.

#41 Mary Elizabeth

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Posted 27 May 2008 - 12:02 PM

I looked at 6 classic peanut butter cookie recipes: Betty Crocker Cooky Book, San Francisco Baking Institute, Village Baker's Wife, Joy of Cooking, and 2 from the internet that were mentioned up thread. These 6 recipes broke down into 2 ur-recipes, which I express in baker's percentages:

#1, #2
flour: 100, 100
sugar: 110, 150
butter: 60, 80
peanut butter: 70/80, 100/150/200
egg: 28, 35

Group 2 is higher sugar, higher fat, with more egg for body, and should be chewier.
I baked the Peanut Butter Chocolate Chunk Cookie, which is in group 2, and have pictures, but I can't figure out how to get pictures here.

I can't figure out how to get the numbers to stay in columes, so I hope can see the 2 groups.

Edited by Mary Elizabeth, 27 May 2008 - 12:08 PM.


#42 Mary Elizabeth

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Posted 02 June 2008 - 01:41 PM

Here are the peanut butter chocolate chunk cookies, recipe 48532 at Recipezaar, mentioned upthread:
Posted Image
Posted Image

#43 Lisa2k

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Posted 02 June 2008 - 02:09 PM

Lisa2k,

I made the Boucheron nutter butter cookies, with their cream filling.  The cookies spread and flatten to about 3-4 inches wide, 1/4 inch thick.  When cool they are very rubbery, and stay that way for 3-4 days.  They fall apart when you bite into them, so they don't squish the cream, which is very soft, out the sides.  They would make good ice cream sandwich cookies.

View Post


So, as a regular cookie, 'eh', but would better if frozen with ice cream? Have you tried Cook's Illustrated Super-Nutty Peanut Butter cookies with the Bouchon filling? I thought they turned out quite well, although they were a little on the soft side, and for me, if I'm going to fill a peanut butter cookie, I prefer a little 'crunch' along with the chewy.
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#44 Pucca

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 09:15 PM

The last batch of PB cookies that I made were from the Magnolia Bakery cookbook. I'm not a big fan of their cupcakes, but after I saw these cookies posted on a food blog, I had to try them for myself. They were delicious and melted in my mouth. The recipe calls for chunky pb, pb chips, and choc chips. As a kid, I never really cared for chunky pb, but I love the added texture that it adds to the cookie.

#45 ElsieD

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 08:35 AM

I have a friend who has just had surgery for a serious health issue. I want to make him a batch of his favourite cookies. I used to make peanut butter years ago but stopped when I found all the recipes I tried to be cloying sweet. Would anyone have a recipe they would be willing to share that showcases the peanut butter rather than the sugar? It would make my friend very happy and he could use a bit of happiness right now. Thank you!

#46 cakewalk

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 09:11 AM

They do tend to be very sweet. I use Dorie Greenspan's recipe, but I reduce the sugar. I have the amounts written in my cookbook, I'll post them later this evening when I get home.



#47 Shel_B

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 09:50 AM

I have a friend who has just had surgery for a serious health issue. I want to make him a batch of his favourite cookies. I used to make peanut butter years ago but stopped when I found all the recipes I tried to be cloying sweet. Would anyone have a recipe they would be willing to share that showcases the peanut butter rather than the sugar? It would make my friend very happy and he could use a bit of happiness right now. Thank you!

 

Cook's Illustrated had a nice looking recipe.  I'll be happy to send it to you as it's been saved to my recipe files.  Let me know.  It's a sandwich cookie ...


 ... Shel

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#48 KennethT

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 09:53 AM

I wonder if adding more salt would offset the sweetness? I assume you're starting with an unsweetened peanut butter?
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#49 ElsieD

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 09:56 AM

Cakewalk, looking forward to the recipe. Shel_B, I would appreciate that. And KennethT, I always used regular peanut butter like Jiffy or Skippy which is of course, already sweetened. Maybe that was part of the problem?

#50 Shel_B

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 10:12 AM

I have a friend who has just had surgery for a serious health issue. I want to make him a batch of his favourite cookies. I used to make peanut butter years ago but stopped when I found all the recipes I tried to be cloying sweet. Would anyone have a recipe they would be willing to share that showcases the peanut butter rather than the sugar? It would make my friend very happy and he could use a bit of happiness right now. Thank you!

 

Check your personal messages ...


 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "


#51 KennethT

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 10:16 AM

hmmm... my gut instinct is that using a presweetened peanut butter is a big part of teh problem... to me, when I taste them, they are already too sweet. Before changing your recipe, I would try using the same recipe, but using a natural, unsweetened peanut butter - the fresher ground the better. I think your cookies will come out much more peanutty! I don't know if you have a Whole Foods near you, or if so, they even have this machine, but the WF near me has a nut grinder where you can grind a variety of nuts into butters on demand. Make as much as you want - they charge by weight. The butters don't come out super smooth, but they have a very strong peanut aroma. Use the unsalted peanuts, and then add salt to your batter to taste (or use your recipe).

#52 MelissaH

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 10:40 AM

I liked Joanne Chang's recipe, published in her cookbook Flour and available on line here: http://macybakes.blo...nut-butter.html

She uses Teddie brand peanut butter, but if that isn't available where you are, look for something that's not too sweet. I prefer something that's homogenized, because the all-natural stuff always seems to make the cookies too oily.


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#53 cakewalk

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 10:42 AM

Just about every recipe I've ever seen for peanut butter cookies (or peanut butter anything) warns against using "natural" peanut butter. I think it's due to the texture more than anything else.


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#54 KennethT

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 11:02 AM

I see both of those points - oiliness and texture... I don't know of any smooth, homogenized brand that isn't too sweet though...

#55 gfron1

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 11:14 AM

Our favorite recipe is Lebovitz with a teaspoon of cayenne. We don't fork them down so they stay light and crumbly.


Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#56 Shel_B

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 11:18 AM

I see both of those points - oiliness and texture... I don't know of any smooth, homogenized brand that isn't too sweet though...

 

http://www.adamspean...ter.com/product  Just the first one that popped into my head.  Whole Foods, I'm sure, has something similar, as do at least several local markets here, often under their own brand name.  They all have butters made without sugar and/or salt.


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 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "


#57 Katie Meadow

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 11:54 AM

My favorite recipe is Clair Robinson's flourless peanut butter cookies.

http://whisksandwhim...butter-cookies/

I tweak them just a bit by adding a T or so of buckwheat flour, which helps manage them, but isn't necessary. Without flour the pb taste is BIG. I use natural unsweetened chunky pb, Adams or Laura Scudders--both easy to find in supermarkets. Then I add a few sprinkles of goodies, such as some cocoa nibs and/or black sesame seeds. They are really pretty great. Along with the sea salt on top I also sprinkle a little large-crystal sugar so they are sweet and salty on top. These are not super-sweet cookies, but I find the sugar can be cut back a bit for excellent results.

#58 CatPoet

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 12:06 PM

I use this, http://www.foodnetwo...ies-recipe.html and you need to find a none sweetened all natural peanut butter or they get too sweet.

20141229_151556_zps3031c030.jpg

 

I dipped them in dark chocolae and skipped the salt on top.


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#59 Porthos

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 12:38 PM

I don't care for peanut butter cookies but my DW and my FIL always really enjoy them made with the recipe in this link:  http://chowhound.cho...m/topics/280194. It's a staple for vacation and for Christmas cookie tins.

 

It's a few entries down and is from dixieday. I have a Word Document version that I could PM you if your interested.

 

As an aside, I hope to someday figure out how to link replacing the URL with my own text.


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#60 andiesenji

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 12:59 PM

This is my "old standard" Peanut butter cookie recipe.  As noted, these are a bit sturdier than regular PB cookies - I developed this recipe so they could be shipped without breaking up into crumbs.

I converted it to weight measurements some time ago and can't find the old one with volume measurements. 

These use less sugar than most recipes and are plenty sweet. 

Sturdy Peanut Butter Cookies
Good for shipping.

This recipe makes about 60 cookies depending on size.   I aim for 7 cm in diameter.

270 gm        butter, unsalted  softened (room temp)
130 gm        brown sugar                
130 gm        white sugar                
280 gm        peanut butter        you can use smooth or chunky REGULAR not "natural"  (Jif, Skippy or Planters)
1            egg  extra large  
2 teaspoons    vanilla extract

Measure the next three ingredients into a separate bowl and whisk to blend.
400 gm        flour, all purpose
3/4 teaspoon    baking soda  (bicarb)
1/2 teaspoon    salt

Optional:  You can add either chopped peanuts or chocolate chips,  up to about 180 gm if you wish.

Put the softened butter and both sugars in the bowl of a mixer and beat until fluffy.
Add the peanut butter and beat until well blended.
Add the egg and vanilla extract  and beat until blended.
Beat in 1/3 of the flour mixture until smooth.
Add another third and beat again until the dough appears smooth and creamy.
Add the remaining third a little at a time - the dough will begin to pull away from the sides of the bowl. 

If you are adding chopped peanuts or choc chips, add them now.

Cover the bowl and refrigerate for 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 177° C  - 350° F.  

Line baking sheets with parchment paper  or if you have Silpat sheets, use those.

With a small soup spoon or *disher, form the dough into 2.5 cm balls.  I scoop them roughly onto the sheet pans then roll each between my palms to for a ball.  

Place on the sheet pans about 5 cm apart.

Flatten the balls to about 1 cm thick (or a bit less) with a fork dipped in granulated sugar, forming a criss-cross pattern.

Bake the cookies for 12 minutes, until they just show a touch of color around the edges.

Transfer to a wire rack to cool.
I just pull the entire sheet of parchment off the sheet pan, allow the pan to cool and transfer another loaded sheet onto the pan.  
The cookies will pop right off the parchment when cool and  you can use it again, several times.

I have a glass with a "hobnail" bottom and I use this to flatten my cookies.  It is faster than using a fork but not everyone has one of these.  A friend, who makes huge batches of these cookies uses a round potato masher that leaves a waffle pattern on the cookies.

I've found this recipe can be doubled or tripled for more cookies, but I make multiple batches rather than one big batch if I need more than four times as many cookies.  

These cookies hold together when dunked in coffee or cocoa!

* A disher is an ice cream scoop, they come in various sizes from very small to very large.  

You can use different types of flour if you wish.  Whole wheat flour - you will have to use less because it absorbs more moisture.
Same with oat flour, although this does produce a lovely, tender cookie, not as sturdy as with regular flour.
I have not tried it with other flours but have been told that coconut flour will not hold together well using this recipe.


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