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JoNorvelleWalker

Dinner 2020

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I would, at that.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Happy Mother's Day to all!

 

Made sushi for MD. Didn't have sake, so made do with Corona beer. :-)

 

dcarch

 

978973778_Coronasushi2020a.thumb.jpg.05a0a96bc589c531c2653b184412906e.jpg

 

336885070_Coronasushi2020.thumb.JPG.213e08992a7c15be54ed9f8ceb68c826.JPG

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35 minutes ago, kayb said:

@BKEats, I believe that bass was glaring at you.

Hello...my name is Inigo Montoya...

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Posted (edited)

@Kim Shook Thanks!

Cippolini- cut off ends but don't peel (yet) boil x 5 min or so (longer for bigger ones, I don't think you can go wrong boiling longer, but shorter results in less glaze absorption). Let cool, peel off ugly stuff. Lay butt side down in the smallest baking dish that will hold them (Big ramekin?) salt and put in enough saba + red wine 50:50 to be a couple mm deep. Bake at 375 x ~20-30 min. Flip over midway. keep an eye on them that they don't over cook

 

Sprouts- halve and blanch for 5 min or so, then fry in a skim of oil face down till nicely browned. Toss in a bit of Saba or reduced balsamic. Saba has the advantage of being right there in a bottle

 

Pork loin butterflied with two cuts so its a big flat piece of meat . Salt it. ( Cut the top third nearly to the end, then cut the bottom 2/3 in the middle almost to the end).

 

Take a handful of frozen spinach and squeeze the water out of it. Mix with sauteed garlic 3/4 tsp and finely chopped rosemary 3/4 tsp. Don't overdo the garlic. This is pretty garlicky as it is. Spread the green stuff over the pork, roll and tie. SV x 3 hours at 140F.  I've done it with pureed chopped roasted peppers in place of the spinach, that adds a nice bit of flavor. and you can serve it with a romesco sauce to match.

 

(This time I used transglutaminase to glue the thing, but it's not needed. I don't usually use it. It does make slicing intact easier).

 

The sauce was more than gourmet chicken demi + a 1/2 tsp dijon in 50:50 apple juice /water. (maybe a half cup total) Simmered, salted and thickened by whisking in a couple pats of butter.


Edited by gfweb (log)
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9 hours ago, Duvel said:

Pizza bianca (just fresh mozzarella di buffala), topped with cream cheese, smoked salmon and chives after baking …
 

2AFBC81D-5CE6-4E34-9B3E-F84A8A10F7F0.thumb.jpeg.04036074187f37192724cb6a0b98560d.jpeg

 

 

What is the pink stuff dripping off?

 

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34 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

What is the pink stuff dripping off?

 


That could either be a) a Mai Tai-induced vision of unicorn poo, or b) a glimpse of the IKEA plastic plate that we for some strange reasons use traditionally (and only for that purpose) for eating our Sunday night pizza ...

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6 hours ago, TdeV said:

 

Recipe, please?

 

The recipe is from The Yogi Cook Book, Yogi Vithaldas and Susan Roberts, Bell Publishing Company, New York, 1968 (pp 36-38):

 

"Like so many things in life, Bryani is more difficult to explain than to prepare.  I lead you gently toward it.  To do otherwise would discourage you, and that would be too bad."

 

It is a five layered dish of basmati rice, sautéed scallions and potatoes, saffron rice, fruit and nuts.  The final layer is yogurt.  The vessel is covered in waxed paper and wrapped in muslin.  Baked 325F.  I confess these days I omit the waxed paper and muslin, and just cover with a lid.

 

When the book was new there were few people from India living in this area.  Fortunately at the university I was acquainted with two people from India.  I asked each about bryani.  One told me bryani could not be made with meat.  The other told me bryani could not be made without meat.  Given this information I prepare the recipe vegetarian as written and serve grilled lamb on the side.

 

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The pinnacle of German cuisine from the 50’s - Toast Hawaii ...

 

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(augmented by Jägertoast - same concept, just with mushrooms)

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Posted (edited)
44 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

The recipe is from The Yogi Cook Book, Yogi Vithaldas and Susan Roberts, Bell Publishing Company, New York, 1968 (pp 36-38):

 

"Like so many things in life, Bryani is more difficult to explain than to prepare.  I lead you gently toward it.  To do otherwise would discourage you, and that would be too bad."

 

It is a five layered dish of basmati rice, sautéed scallions and potatoes, saffron rice, fruit and nuts.  The final layer is yogurt.  The vessel is covered in waxed paper and wrapped in muslin.  Baked 325F.  I confess these days I omit the waxed paper and muslin, and just cover with a lid.

 

When the book was new there were few people from India living in this area.  Fortunately at the university I was acquainted with two people from India.  I asked each about bryani.  One told me bryani could not be made with meat.  The other told me bryani could not be made without meat.  Given this information I prepare the recipe vegetarian as written and serve grilled lamb on the side.

 

What is the difference between bryani and biryani?  I have only seen biryani, and only seen made with meat - I've seen chicken, mutton, goat and fish versions... from Hyderabad (the most famous), Punjab (also Pakistan) and elsewhere...  the recipe you discuss seems very different from every Hyderabadi biryani recipe I've ever seen, of which there are many (all of which are relatively similar).

 

ETA: I would assume that the Yogi Cook Book is completely vegetarian (if not vegan), no?  Just because most really hardcore yogis stress ahimsa (roughly translated as non-harming) but is often (not necessarily correctly) thought to mean that you must be vegan to be a yogi - although there are many gurus who would disagree with that.


Edited by KennethT (log)

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On 5/8/2020 at 10:20 PM, MetsFan5 said:

Pistachios. I get pissed  when the ones that are barely open won’t open...

My brother broke a tooth trying to crack open one of those barely open pistachios. 

I learned from his lesson...I now buy them already shelled.:wink:

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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44 minutes ago, Toliver said:

My brother broke a tooth trying to crack open one of those barely open pistachios. 

I learned from his lesson...I now buy them already shelled.:wink:

Oh no. 

Shelling the little things is part of the habituation.

One by one.

Shell one eat one.

Shell one give one to Henry.

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Fish cake with remoulade, roasted carrots and parsnips.

 

0062.thumb.jpg.5b6d59e5256e00a7ecfd7f1bf08587e7.jpg

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A5 wagyu with roasted portobello and king trumpet mushrooms.

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1 hour ago, KennethT said:

What is the difference between bryani and biryani?  I have only seen biryani, and only seen made with meat - I've seen chicken, mutton, goat and fish versions... from Hyderabad (the most famous), Punjab (also Pakistan) and elsewhere...  the recipe you discuss seems very different from every Hyderabadi biryani recipe I've ever seen, of which there are many (all of which are relatively similar).

 

ETA: I would assume that the Yogi Cook Book is completely vegetarian (if not vegan), no?  Just because most really hardcore yogis stress ahimsa (roughly translated as non-harming) but is often (not necessarily correctly) thought to mean that you must be vegan to be a yogi - although there are many gurus who would disagree with that.

 

 

Spelling I suspect.  I have another cookbook, Indian Cookery, Dharamjit Singh, Penguin Books, Harmondsworth, 1970, with several disparate versions and a treatise on the subject.  However his spelling is biriani.  An alternative name he gives is Zarebrian.

 

EGullet seems to prefer biryani:

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/28910-home-made-biryani/

 

 

Yes, The Yogi Cook Book is completely vegetarian -- not at all vegan.

 

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shrimp stir fry, garlic, ginger, frozen peas and fresh carrots chicken stock, slurry and a lightly beaten egg

IMG_7601.JPG

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Zucchini with remaining gribiche sauce

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Choucroute repurposed into "kimchee pancakes", Mexican sour cream, grilled leftover  sausages

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eGullet member #80.

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@Shelby – what all is in your goulash?  It looks like chili-mac, which I love dearly.

 

@gfweb – thank you so much!  Mr. Kim and I are very happy to have the directions for that great looking meal.  The fish cakes from your last meal you posted look wonderful.  What kind of fish?

 

@mgaretz – I really love the look of your molasses bread.  It is so much darker than any I’m seeing online.

 

 

Dinner tonight – Beef Chow Fun and broccoli.  Sliced flank steak:

IMG_2107.jpg.258a28e01fece80d16ab47a8201e5f22.jpg

 

Mise:

IMG_2115.jpg.09092978a82649434bd6aa0a1f6646c9.jpg

 

Chow Fun:

IMG_2116.jpg.7b5600dfb519954a4a9312754dd167af.jpg

 

IMG_2117.jpg.bfa95f9194934f1116599bbd952b6bf3.jpg

Found this recipe online after reading about the dish somewhere.  I’d never tasted it and it sounded like something I’d like.  The flavor was really good, but I need to play around with the proportions a bit.  It could use some additional vegetables, too.

 

CSO baked/steamed broccoli with butter and lemon pepper:

IMG_2119.thumb.jpg.a84ecbab5a8d36513d449e14e47c4536.jpg

 

Dessert:

IMG_2118.thumb.jpg.378d7a852fafabf4999f630f11423a32.jpg

😁

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Posted (edited)

Lettuce wraps with bok choy.. The protein was skirt steak and a pork chop.. Trying to make my way through the inventory... I think today is the last day before it all goes into the deep freeze.... Simple marinade of brown sugar, soy, chinese bbq sauce and fish sauce.    Pickled sichuan vegetables i had in a jar... I also may rice. 

 

 

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Bok choy was from the farmers market.. I was going to steam in a wok with garlic and then add an oyster sauce.. But, out of oyster sauce so, made a vinegar, tahini, soy ginger thing.. But, yeh, cooked in a bit of oil and maybe 4 cloves of garlic, then hit with some water and covered... Cooked a little longer and then sauce on the platter.   It was good.. I also made some white rice.. really simple, some oil, garlic, ginger, for like 15 minutes..   Got rid of bok choy, lettuce, a pork chop, some skirt steak... Really blah, freaking boring day... Oh well.  One day closer to see my kids. 

 


Edited by BKEats (log)
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Most of the food in this topic is plated so beautifully that I feel like a piker when I post. Nonetheless I have a couple of dinner successes to share. First up: prime rib. In one May week my darling and I celebrate both our birthdays and our anniversary. His daughter decided to recognize the event - his birthday in particular - with a massive gift: nearly 14 pounds of prime rib! This would be a marvelous party food. Under other circumstances the entire family would have been here to celebrate with us. Since they weren't, I cut that rib into smaller, more manageable chunks. The first prime rib dinner came last weekend.

 

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Unctuous. Tender. Fatty. Delicious. The photo makes it look overcooked, but blame the camera and photographer; there was a lot of "rare" in that meat and we have leftovers! The accompaniment was smashed potatoes drizzled with ramp oil.

 

A less-than-satisfying dinner came on another night when we tried yet again to cook country-style ribs in the slow cooker, bathed in barbecue sauce. I've never been a big fan of this recipe, but it used to be one of his favorites. Somehow, sometime over the years, either the slow cooker temperatures have changed or the pork has gotten too lean. We were disappointed again: dry, cottony meat with little flavor. I was too dispirited to take a photo. Tonight, however, I dealt with the leftovers: chopped the meat into small bites, heated them slowly in the leftover juices and a touch more sauce, and served over rice. Not bad. I added hot sauce and salt to my portion, to cut down on the sweetness of the barbecue sauce; he loved his as it was.

 

20200511_211301.jpg

 

The REAL star of tonight's dinner comes courtesy of a discussion in April about what to do with asparagus ends. I've been saving the ends in the freezer. The latest batch of asparagus I bought wasn't great, and it needed to be used before it got any worse. It was time to try one of several suggestions, and I opted for @Dave the Cook's suggestion of soup. This is a terrific recipe and I'm glad I finally tried it. It was the big hit of the evening for both of us: better than the asparagus alone would have been, and quite flavorful. There is, however, the matter of plating....or bowling, in this case...

 

20200511_211354.jpg

 

Of course a garnish would have helped. Asparagus tips (none survived). Croutons. Fresh herbs. Something! But no, you'll just have to look at a creamy, silky, faintly green soup that is not pea soup. For the recipe and a proper photo, go here.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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@Ann_T, it looks wonderful as usual. I'm especially interested in the Peri-Peri garlic mayonnaise. Did you make it from scratch? Did you have Peri-Peri sauce (as I do, in some cabinet somewhere) and simply add it to the mayonnaise? Some instructions would be welcome.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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