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Absurdly, stupidly basic cooking questions (Part 2)

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Posted (edited)

Some other questions: Say the lamb shoulder gets cooked sous vide as one piece. I then want to prepare two dishes of 1.5" diced lamb.

  1. Some folks like meat much rarer than I do, I was thinking to cook probably 48 hours at something less than 141F but lots higher than 133F (sorry, @rotuts). Do you recommend doing the meat at two temperatures, and if so, how?
  2. I can cut and sear the meat post sous vide?
  3. The same folks like meat much spicier than I do. I'm thinking of coating one dish of lamb with a mixture of curry powder, dry mustard, black and cayenne pepper, cardamom, cumin, allspice (deSaulniers, Salad Days p.193). Do I use the mixture pre-sear? Post-sear also?
  4. As a general rule, does one use less spice if it follows a sous vide cook?
  5. After searing, can I keep the meat warm in bags in the sous-vide water (cooled by a few degrees)? For a couple of hours? What does that do to the texture?

Edited by TdeV Clarity (log)

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I've been playing with fried chicken.  It seems that traditionally fried chicken involves batter or breading in some way, shape, or form.  What is the reason for this?

 

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53 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I've been playing with fried chicken.  It seems that traditionally fried chicken involves batter or breading in some way, shape, or form.  What is the reason for this?

 

Flavor and crunch enhancement.  Also, any bare flesh (there's always some) would get seriously tough immersed in boiling oil.  Or have I misunderstood your question?  

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25 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

Flavor and crunch enhancement.  Also, any bare flesh (there's always some) would get seriously tough immersed in boiling oil.  Or have I misunderstood your question?  

 

Thanks, I don't think you misunderstood the question.  However last night I got very good results, I thought, deep frying bare naked chicken.  I may try coating some to see if I like it better.

 

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1 minute ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Thanks, I don't think you misunderstood the question.  However last night I got very good results, I thought, deep frying bare naked chicken.  I may try coating some to see if I like it better.

 

Wow.  That's intriguing to me.  I've always felt that the coating was protective as much as anything.  I looked at your picture and that thigh looks great.  Also, now that I think about it, lots of places don't batter or even flour their wings.  Hmmmmm.  I'll have to try this out.  Coating can be a mess and time consuming - I might find myself frying nekkid chicken fairly often!  I'm glad you asked the question!

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18 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

Wow.  That's intriguing to me.  I've always felt that the coating was protective as much as anything.  I looked at your picture and that thigh looks great.  Also, now that I think about it, lots of places don't batter or even flour their wings.  Hmmmmm.  I'll have to try this out.  Coating can be a mess and time consuming - I might find myself frying nekkid chicken fairly often!  I'm glad you asked the question!

No no no no. Fried chicken without a coating is just wrong. Shame on you both. Harumph.

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2 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I've been playing with fried chicken.  It seems that traditionally fried chicken involves batter or breading in some way, shape, or form.  What is the reason for this?

 

 

Makes it easier to pick off the greasy part 😏

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3 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

 

Makes it easier to pick off the greasy part 😏

...to be devoured first. :)

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"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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39 minutes ago, chromedome said:

...to be devoured first. :)


Now I feel dumb... I thought that's what she meant. :D

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Posted (edited)
34 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:


Now I feel dumb... I thought that's what she meant. :D

 

Haha, nope!

 

Well OK, the first few bites are good but I have my limit and it's low.

 

Not dumb just a different POV.


Edited by pastrygirl (log)
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On 6/16/2019 at 7:58 PM, pastrygirl said:

 

You could call it a trifle but there are some technical differences to the others.  Fool doesn't have cake, just fruit and cream.  Buckles, slumps, and grunts are batter or dough baked together with fruit rather than prepared separately and layered. 

 

Sorry, I'm kind of a pastry nerd. 🙄😊

Hello Pastrygirl!

Pastry nerd or not, your answer came up in my search for apple buckle! I searched the Google gods for this answer and they came up with an apple watch strap buckle!!! Thank goodness for egullet. 

Now, here is my need: I had apple buckle as a child and it was served warm with warm vanilla custard. That is still my very favorite. Then I had apple pie as an adult and it was served alone or with vanilla ice cream. 

Now I want to serve some apple dessert to a crowd for potluck. It cannot be hot from the oven, and there is no provision for ice-cream. It would all be in foil tray containers and remain at room temp for several hours. 

Which kind of apple dessert will work without custard or icecream, and the topping should not get soggy too? 

Apple crisp will get soggy. Any solution? For 50 people.

Bhukkhad

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46 minutes ago, Bhukhhad said:

Hello Pastrygirl!

Pastry nerd or not, your answer came up in my search for apple buckle! I searched the Google gods for this answer and they came up with an apple watch strap buckle!!! Thank goodness for egullet. 

Now, here is my need: I had apple buckle as a child and it was served warm with warm vanilla custard. That is still my very favorite. Then I had apple pie as an adult and it was served alone or with vanilla ice cream. 

Now I want to serve some apple dessert to a crowd for potluck. It cannot be hot from the oven, and there is no provision for ice-cream. It would all be in foil tray containers and remain at room temp for several hours. 

Which kind of apple dessert will work without custard or icecream, and the topping should not get soggy too? 

Apple crisp will get soggy. Any solution? For 50 people.

Bhukkhad

 

I beg to help:  Joy of Cooking Sour cream apple cake soufflé Cockaigne.  It is served at room temperature.  I have taken it to potlucks.  Always been well received.

 

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16 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I beg to help:  Joy of Cooking Sour cream apple cake soufflé Cockaigne.  It is served at room temperature.  I have taken it to potlucks.  Always been well received.

 

Joy of cooking. Is it a ‘souffle’? I am not an advanced baker. Would you send me the recipe please. Perhaps separately as others might already know it. 

Thank you

Bhukkhad

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7 minutes ago, Bhukhhad said:

Joy of cooking. Is it a ‘souffle’? I am not an advanced baker. Would you send me the recipe please. Perhaps separately as others might already know it. 

Thank you

Bhukkhad

 

Pretty sure I am not allowed to post the recipe.  You can read about it here...

https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/interviews/joy-of-cooking-family-history

 

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@Bhukhhad serve pouring custard or whipped cream on the side.  Creme anglaise can be kept cold in a thermos or in a bowl that is inside a larger bowl of ice.

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24 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

@Bhukhhad serve pouring custard or whipped cream on the side.  Creme anglaise can be kept cold in a thermos or in a bowl that is inside a larger bowl of ice.

Ah! Like I might serve sour cream with tacos. Nice idea for the creme anglaise in a double bowl. 

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