Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


Recommended Posts

Tonight I tried to cook tuna at 110f for 45 mins before searing- as was recommended on serious eats. 

 

I have to to say it came out way too grey and 'done' for me. I won't be doing that again. 

 

Anyone else give give that a go?

i'm a little surprised, as Kenji is usually pretty on these things. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used Kenji's suggestions with tuna for a NYE app and later on for dinner.  The app was excellent and my dinner wasn't bad but maybe a little over done but not gray.   It's was a thinner portion I used for dinner.  Here is the dinner photo.  Very pink but no red.  I think I only went about 30+ min but maybe close to 45 min 

 

image.jpeg

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Only leftover sous vide chicken for me tonight -- but I got a copy Lisa Fetterman's Sous Vide at Home from work.

 

 

Please do share your thoughts on the book when you've had time to give it a good once over.  I think there are several of us interested.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

Please do share your thoughts on the book when you've had time to give it a good once over.  I think there are several of us interested.

 I have that book in Kindle format but find I am much more engaged with The Complete Sous Vide Cookbook by Chris McDonald that I mentioned earlier. It includes Recipes for black garlic and 50 hour preserved lemons. Here's  a link to some interesting tidbits about Chef McDonald. Still have not tested recipes from either book so I'm not prepared to give either a thumbs up yet. 

Edited by Anna N (log)
  • Like 3

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/10/2017 at 1:55 PM, weedy said:

I not only noticed that, I tweeted to a few modernist chef's about it for comment. 

Will be interesting to see if anyone responds. 

I personally think that both Collichio and Sean Brock are just traditionalist and predisposed to dislike the IDEA of SV. 

 

There's no reason why, if done CORRECTLY, pork loin is going to be "drier" cooked SV 

 

it sounds a bit like buying the long disproved 'searing locks in juices' meme. 

 

 

Ps I love Husk.  It's just not the ONLY way to cook. 

I like Ink just as much. 

 

 

 

 

You can call Husk traditionalist, but that doesn't necessarily mean Brock is. His recipes show up throughout Modernist Cuisine, and before many of us had even heard of sous vide, he was known among the vanguard of modernist chefs (Dufresne, Blais, et al) as "the methocel guy."

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I need to go back to the SV bacon idea. We had problems with it because after cooking it in the package, we couldn't get the slices to separate. Last time I shopped, I got another package of the same kind of bacon (Wegmans brand center-cut thick sliced), to cook by more traditional methods. And my husband asked if this was the same kind I'd done SV.

 

I replied, "Yes, why?"

 

He said that he was having problems separating the slices uncooked, just like he'd had problems separating the slices cooked.

 

So I might need to redo that experiment, either using a different kind of bacon that WILL separate easily, or by separating the slices ahead of time and then resealing them before SV.

 

Thoughts?

  • Like 1

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

Link to post
Share on other sites

 I am attempting @shains  technique for sweet potatoes.   I realize now that I did not ask enough questions. Does he cook them whole and unpeeled initially? Or does he cut them up after peeling them and cook them that way. Will it work if I  put them into a zip lock bag with a little butter and Sous Vide them at 69°C for an hour before roasting them. I guess I'm going to answer my own questions.   Keeping them submerged is the biggest challenge.

  • Like 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites

image.jpeg

 

 I think there is no doubt that the technique discussed above does something to the sugars in the sweet potatoes. The edges are much more caramelized than the rest of the potato and subjectively I do think they are sweeter. I also felt the texture was somewhat changed.  Hard to describe but they seem to hold together better while still being very tender. I admit that could be something I imagined.  @shain  strongly recommending serving the sweet potatoes with some unadulterated tahini  but darned if I could find mine.

Edited by Anna N (log)
  • Like 6

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites

Serious Eats did a post about parcooking sweet potatoes a while ago, and my husband used it as the jumping-off point for some student research. Basically, by preheating the sweet potatoes, you're mashing them like brewers do in the beginning stages of all-grain beer production, and allowing the enzymes in the sweet potatoes to start converting the starches into simpler sugars. The sugars then brown more in the roasting process. My husband's student looked into the temperature and time variables of starch conversion.

  • Like 5

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, MelissaH said:

Serious Eats did a post about parcooking sweet potatoes a while ago, and my husband used it as the jumping-off point for some student research. Basically, by preheating the sweet potatoes, you're mashing them like brewers do in the beginning stages of all-grain beer production, and allowing the enzymes in the sweet potatoes to start converting the starches into simpler sugars. The sugars then brown more in the roasting process. My husband's student looked into the temperature and time variables of starch conversion.

Here's a link to the Serious Eats discussion. 

  • Like 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites

@Anna N I'm very glad that you enjoyed the sweet potatoes. Kenji at Serious Eats does a great work explaining the science behind cooking and I do enjoy his writing a lot. I do however need to credit Harold McGee, it took me a long while, but I'm finally getting close to the end of On Food and Cooking. This book is full of interesting facts that can be utilized when cooking.

 

By the way, I'm obviously late, but I usually don't peel the sweet potatoes. I slice them and then place directly in the  water. They float a little, but stay submerged. The key is the temrature, so it doesn't really matter. I think your description of their texture is spot on - tender and creamy yet intact.

Edited by shain (log)
  • Like 2

~ Shai N.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It may be bad tv editIng; but I wouldn't complain if Collichio and Brock had said she didn't SV the pork CORRECTLY. 

(Richard Blais criticised a dish in Top Chef last year by saying 'this is the sort of thing that gives Sous Vide a bad name') but instead they singled out the IDEA that SV would lead to "drier" pork.

That's my beef (pun intended)

 

Larry Hagman started to have a Texas accent in all his post Dallas appearances. 

Sean Brock my be playing the part of the traditionalist preservationist on tv. 

 

Edited by weedy (log)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night...prime, dry aged strip steak:

 

PrimeStrip02122017.png

 

 

...bagged and sealed:

 

BaggedStrip02122017.png

 

 

After about two and three quarter hours at 58 deg C, pan seared in Falk, pan temperature checked with surface contact Thermapen:

 

SearedStrip02122017.png

 

 

Note, I needed to sit down with a mai tai at some point and threw the paper towel wiped steak in the CSO 125 deg F. convection bake to dry out a bit before searing.

 

Meanwhile, béarnaise:

 

BearnaiseReduction02122017.png

 

 

I get to talk about that here because the egg was pasteurized sous vide.  Finished sauce:

 

Bearnaise02122017.png

 

Note CSO at 125 deg F is wonderful for holding béarnaise.

 

Plated:

 

Dinner02122017.png

 

 

Of course by the time the photoshoot was finished, the plate was stone cold.  Nonetheless the beef was fork tender and possibly the best béarnaise I've made.

 

 

  • Like 17
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Of course by the time the photoshoot was finished, the plate was stone cold.

 

Beautiful dinner! It's been a long time since I made hollandaise, and the next time I get my hands on some good asparagus, this is happening. Did you use powdered tarragon for your bearnaise? I usually see it with flecks of green.

 

I so appreciate all the beautiful food photos on this site. I don't own a camera or money to buy luxuries like that, but even if I did, letting a beautiful plate of food get cold while futzing with anything but digging in is anathema to me. I suspect that is what makes me prone to even forget garnishes that have been carefully prepared are sitting ready on the counter many times.

  • Like 3

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

Beautiful dinner! It's been a long time since I made hollandaise, and the next time I get my hands on some good asparagus, this is happening. Did you use powdered tarragon for your bearnaise? I usually see it with flecks of green.

 

I so appreciate all the beautiful food photos on this site. I don't own a camera or money to buy luxuries like that, but even if I did, letting a beautiful plate of food get cold while futzing with anything but digging in is anathema to me. I suspect that is what makes me prone to even forget garnishes that have been carefully prepared are sitting ready on the counter many times.

 

Thank you for the compliment.  No, this was fresh tarragon.  See photograph above.  Not that I have anything against dried tarragon, mind you.  But I cannot abide flecks of anything in my béarnaise.  The shallot and tarragon reduction was carefully strained.  Actually, reduced to sec, wine added, and then strained.

 

I just use an iPad for my food pictures, nothing fancy.  I used to manufacture digital cameras for a living and I own a battery of film cameras from the last century.  But the iPad is what I pick up.  Usually food temperature is not a problem, though I admit I got carried away with myself last night!

 

 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

...the plate was stone cold...

 

This is one of the reasons I almost never take a pic (tripod and delay timer are musts for me) or otherwise putz around.

I have nothing to prove — the only thing I'm good at is snarfing down food! :laugh:

  • Like 5

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/14/2017 at 1:33 AM, Thanks for the Crepes said:

I so appreciate all the beautiful food photos on this site. I don't own a camera or money to buy luxuries like that, but even if I did, letting a beautiful plate of food get cold while futzing with anything but digging in is anathema to me

 

I totally agree - so many of the photos here are great and I sometimes wish I could take better pictures, but then I realize I want/need to get dinner on the table.  I suppose one could hold food in a warmer - either the portion for the photo or the rest of the meal.  I would be interested to know more about the the logistics of the more elaborately staged photos.  Perhaps if you have the right setup in place and are practiced enough you can do a good job as quickly as I can snap a picture of a plate with my phone (usually of the entree only, often because that is the only dish I made!).

Edited by rustwood
typo (log)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/12/2017 at 9:28 AM, MelissaH said:

I need to go back to the SV bacon idea. We had problems with it because after cooking it in the package, we couldn't get the slices to separate. Last time I shopped, I got another package of the same kind of bacon (Wegmans brand center-cut thick sliced), to cook by more traditional methods. And my husband asked if this was the same kind I'd done SV.

 

I replied, "Yes, why?"

 

He said that he was having problems separating the slices uncooked, just like he'd had problems separating the slices cooked.

 

So I might need to redo that experiment, either using a different kind of bacon that WILL separate easily, or by separating the slices ahead of time and then resealing them before SV.

 

Thoughts?

The last batch I cooked SV, I let it sit on the counter and cool for about an hour. The bacon "jus" absorbed back into the bacon, leaving just the fat for me to drain off; I opened the packages in the sink, grabbed the bacon out, laid it on a plate en masse, poured the fat up into a container, then put the bacon back in its original bag, which is equipped with its own zipper seal (I use Wright's). I thought the slices separated more easily, and when seared, had a better texture, with the soft, almost creamy inside and the crispy exterior.

 

I bought four more packages of Wright's when I went to the grocery Saturday, as Kroger had them on sale for $4.99 for the 24-oz package. Can't pass that up. I know that cost me points in the FCO challenge.

  • Like 2

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎11‎/‎30‎/‎2016 at 11:59 AM, MelissaH said:

This brings up a topic I've wondered about for a little while. Many vegetables will float, even if you manage to seal them without adding air. I perpetually have a problem when I do carrots, as their density is apparently not much different from water so if you trap the least bit of air in the bag, up it goes.

 

How do you all deal with things that float? I've contemplated putting my sealed food bags inside another ziplock bag, along with a few good-sized washers from the hardware store. My husband proposed adding some large teflon-coated stir-bars from the chemical supply directly to the food bag. At times I've resorted to just using a rack, a potato masher, or another utensil to wedge the bag down. I'm not happy with any of these solutions. So, vegetable bathers, what do you do?

I suggest using the lid from a small-ish cast iron (Le Creuset) stock pot.  My smallest is the 4-½ qt. and the lid is fairly small in diameter.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Found some beef ribs at the supermarket for a good price. Sadly 4 hours is not enough. The second is bathing for 48 hours.

 

 

IMG_4188.JPG

IMG_4190.JPG

 

Trying to decide if I'll roast further in the CSO or IP for stock.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

image.jpeg

 

1.  Boneless beef short ribs from Costco. You see them here being seared before being bagged. I also double bagged them.  Why so many precautions? These were about 1 1/2 times more expensive than the equivalent weight of prime rib! I don't know what possessed me. Anyway they are being cooked at 60°C  for 48 hours.

 

2.   A small, just over a kilogram, boneless, pork shoulder roast. I am cooking it at 62.8° for 6 1/2 hours. I also seared it on all surfaces. This will be my first time doing a pork shoulder roast Sous Vide. 

  • Like 8

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Anonymous Modernist 760
      Thanks for putting up this forum 🙂
      I would like to bake using a combination of sous vide and a conventional oven. Would it be possible to put the dough in a vacuum bag cook it sous vide at 37C for the dough to raise optimal and then put it in a conventional oven?
      Thanks
    • By PedroG
      Utilization of meat leftovers from sous-vide cooking
      Sometimes when you buy a nice cut of meat, your eyes are bigger than your and your beloved's stomach. So what to do with the leftovers?
      In Tyrolia (Austria) they make a "Gröstl", in Solothurn (Switzerland) they make a "Gnusch", in the Seftigenamt (a region in the Swiss canton Berne) they make a "Gmüder", and we (Pedro and SWAMBO) make a varying concoct using ideas from all of the three. We call it "Gröstl", but it is not necessarily a typical Tyrolean Gröstl, and it is different each time, and we usually do not top it with a fried egg as they do in Austria.
      Ingredients

      All your meat leftovers
      Onion (compulsory)
      Any hard vegetable (we prefer celery stalks, or zucchini)
      Any salad (iceberg lettuce or endive/chicory or any other salad leaves, may contain carrot julienne)
      Fried potatoes, or alternatively sweetcorn kernels
      Sherry or wine or bouillon or the gravy you preserved from your last LTLT.cooked meat for simmering (I usually prefer Sherry)
      Eventually some cream (or crème fraîche)
      Salt, pepper, parsley, caraway seeds (typical for Tyrolean Gröstl), paprika, condiment (in Switzerland we use "Aromat" by Knorr, which contains sodium chloride, sodium glutamate, lactose, starch, yeast extract, vegetable fats, onions, spices, E552)'
      vegetable oil (I prefer olive oil)




      Mise en place

      cut your meat in small cubes or slices
      cut the onion(s) not too fine (place the first cut below your tongue to avoid tearing during cutting)
      cut the vegetables about 3-4 mm thick
      cut the salads to pieces smaller than 4 cm, distribute on the cutting board and season deliberately
      cut the potatoes to 1 cm cubes
      place 3 heavy skillets with ample oil on the stove

      Cooking

      in skillet 1, stir-fry the onions, add the hard vegetables still stir-frying, add salad, add sufficient liquid (Sherry or wine or bouillon or gravy) for simmering under a cover until soft. If desired, reduce heat and add some cream at the end.
      in skillet 2, stir-fry the potatoes until soft (in case of sweetcorn kernels, add to skillet 1 after stir-frying and use skillet 2 for skillet 3)
      in skillet 3, as soon as the vegetables and the potatoes are soft, sear the meat in just smoking oil for 30-60 seconds, then add to skillet 1

      Serving
      You may mix the potatoes with the vegetables and meat to make a rather typical Gröstl, or serve the fried potatoes separately; we prefer the latter, as the potatoes stay more crunchy.
      Do not forget to serve a glass of good dry red wine!
    • By PedroG
      Brisket „Stroganoff“ Sous Vide With Mixed Mushrooms

      Ingredients for 2 servings
      about 400g well marbled Brisket
      3 tablespoons rice bran oil or other high smoke point oil (grapeseed oil)
      3 tablespoons extravirgin olive oil
      3 tablespoons Cognac (brandy)
      2 small onions, finely diced
      ½ yellow or red bell peppers cut into strips
      90 g mixed mushrooms
      100 ml of gravy from last Brisket (or concentrated stock)
      1 teaspoon mustard, Dijon type
      1 teaspoon paprika mild (not spicy!)
      1 medium pickled cucumber cut into thin strips
      2 tablespoons parsley, finely chopped
      approx. 120g sour cream with herbs
      Sous Vide - cooking
      Marinate brisket with Mexican style (medium hot) marinade in the vacuum bag for at least 3 days at 1 ° C, cook sous vide 48 hours at 55.0 ° C.
      Preparing the sauce
      At a moderate heat sauté onions in olive oil, add peppers (preblanched in the microwave oven for 2-3 minutes) and mushroom mixture, stir-fry, remove from heat and add the gravy. Add pickled cucumber, pepper, mustard and cognac. Put on very low heat, add sour cream and keep warm, but do not boil as the cream will separate. Remove the brisket from the bag, cut into strips (about 8x10x35mm), sear very quickly in smoking-hot rice bran oil, add the meat and the parsley to the sauce.
      Serving
      Serve on warmed plates. Typically served with spätzle (south German) or chnöpfli (Swiss).
      And don't forget a glass of good red wine!
      Enjoy your meal!
      Pedro

    • By PedroG
      Olla podrida sous vide
      Origin
      Not rotten pot, but mighty or rich pot! Originated in 16th century Spain, olla poderida became olla podrida and was falsely translated into French as pot-pourri.
      Ingredients
      For two servings
      * 100g Brisket well marbled, cooked SV 48h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Pork meat well marbled, cooked SV 24h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Lamb chops without bone, cooked SV 4h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chicken breast, cooked SV 2h/58°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chorizo, sliced approximately 4mm †
      * 125g Chickpeas (garbanzos), soaked overnight in water †
      * 1 Onion chopped medium-fine †
      * ½ Savoy cabbage approx. 200g cut into pieces, thick leaf veins removed
      * ½ Celeriac approx. 200g quartered, sliced about 2mm
      * 2 Carrots sliced approximately 120g about 3mm
      * 1 Leek approximately 20cm / 100g sliced about 5mm
      * Extra virgin olive oil
      * Rice bran oil
      * Dried parsley qs, aromatic, black pepper
      † Beef, pork, lamb and chicken (or at least two kinds of meat) as well as chorizo, chickpeas and onions are mandatory ingredients, other vegetables vary according to desire and availability.
      Cooking
      Boil chickpeas in water for 30-60 min.
      Sauté onions in olive oil, add chorizo, continue sautéing, add chickpeas including its cooking water, add remaining vegetables, cover and cook to the desired softness, stir from time to time. If additional liquid is needed, you may add Sherry instead of water.
      Reduce heat. Season to taste. Add parsley.
      In a heavy skillet, sear the meat dice in just smoking hot rice bran oil (very high smoking point allows very quick sear, not overdoing the center of the meat).
      Sear one kind of meat at a time and transfer to the pan with the vegetables.
    • By Chef Hermes Blog
      Warm Onion Bavarois
      * 300g Sweet Onion purée
      * 250g Whole milk
      * 150g Whipping cream
      * 150g Chicken stock (or fresh vegetable nage, not stock cubes)
      * 3.5g Gellan gum
      * Seasoning
      Lightly grease with vegetable oil the moulds you intend to use (darioles, ramekins etc) and set to one side.
      In a pan (but not on the heat), whisk together all the ingredients.
      Place on a medium heat and whisk continuously, the mix will start to thicken slightly. Carry on whisking for a further 3-4 minutes when it has started to bubble. Then quickly pour into the greased moulds & chill.
      To reheat for serving, just place the ramekin in a pan of water and simmer gently for 8-10 mins.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...