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FrogPrincesse

What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)

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this is the best batch of CB ive ever made , and the first year the iPot will do the veg w the stock from the bags

 

how easy is that ?

 

i hope mustard is on sale this week.

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SV duck breast (seared on Darto) 137F 2 1/2 hrs with lingonberry and toasted chorizo sauce, Smoked mashed yams, bacon Brussels sprouts. Bread pudding.

009.thumb.jpg.33f7c5bfe8f57af4a5f3874ff8fd34f0.jpg

 

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when by S&S today :  yep , mustard on sale :

 

Mustard.jpg.f12fbd0c909f91d27a6cd33d40158e8b.jpg

 

regularly $ 2.99    on sale until March 16th  ( or so ) for $ 1.99    but if you looked closely at the Sale Tags

 

buy 4 for 6 bucks !  

 

I now have a reasonably supply !

 

the CB Vortex dragged me to the far back of the store to look at the CB Points.  still very nice.

 

the dinners are so good and easy I got " a few more "

 

suprise.gif.71c8aa307b75447e4dde403a2154cadb.gif

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Dang....could not resist these beef short ribs at my butcher today.  They are in the bath at 144F until Thursday dinner time.  I took them off the bone and portioned them into 4 oz pieces...that's plenty for me.  Bones and trimmings along with mirepoix are in the IP for gravy making.

DSC01851.thumb.jpg.677b2049957515bd374e68c51e8ec627.jpg

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Snowed in. 

I made burgers. 

LaFrieda brisket blend burgers. 

132f for 2 hrs (from frozen)

finished with provolone and hatch green chiles. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, weedy said:

Snowed in. 

I made burgers. 

LaFrieda brisket blend burgers. 

132f for 2 hrs (from frozen)

finished with provolone and hatch green chiles. 

 

 

^^^^ Woah!!!! Get out of my head, man. 

 

Snowed in here too

The wife wanted LaFrieda burgers

120f for 1.25 hours (from fridge)

finished in a smokin hot steel skillet with pepper jack cheese and charred jalapeños 

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Sous Vide Cream-Poached Pork Loin

 

This was very, very delicious. The pork loin (~1.5 lb from Trader Joe's) was incredibly tender and this was not just the result of the sous-vide technique, but also the milk (I had tried another recipe with pork loin, same temperature and time, and it wasn't as wonderfully tender).

 

Sear then 4 hours @ 62.8C with onions, cognac, milk, crème fraiche.

 

Reducing the sauce before serving

Sous-vide cream-poached pork loin

 

Sous-vide cream-poached pork loin

 

Sous-vide cream-poached pork loin

 

Sous-vide cream-poached pork loin

 

 

Sous-vide cream-poached pork loin

 

Sadly I made a rookie mistake when I reheated the leftovers in a pot (with the sauce), because the meat continued to cook and became tougher/dryer and grey. Next time I will reheat the meat with the sauce with the sous vide.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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Another sous-vide egg bite experiment for my daughter, this time following the recipe a bit more closely (i.e., actually measuring things). This had turkey breast and Mexican cheese blend, crème fraiche instead of cream cheese, was cooked at 77.8C for 1 hour, and was browned in the oven under the broiler. This was pretty good, more tender/less "springy" than the first time.

 

Sous vide egg bite with ham and cheese

 

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10 hours ago, FrogPrincesse said:

Sous Vide Cream-Poached Pork Loin

 

This was very, very delicious. The pork loin (~1.5 lb from Trader Joe's) was incredibly tender and this was not just the result of the sous-vide technique, but also the milk (I had tried another recipe with pork loin, same temperature and time, and it wasn't as wonderfully tender).

 

Sear then 4 hours @ 62.8C with onions, cognac, milk, crème fraiche

 

 

Sous-vide cream-poached pork loin

 

Sadly I made a rookie mistake when I reheated the leftovers in a pot (with the sauce), because the meat continued to cook and became tougher/dryer and grey. Next time I will reheat the meat with the sauce with the sous vide.

 

 

I have to try this!~

 

Serve this with mashed potatoes, do you think that nice? Or any better idea? :)

 

Or perhaps with potato rosti for a bit chruncy texture.

 


Edited by Josh71 (log)

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@FrogPrincesse, that sounds absolutely marvelous. I've bookmarked that recipe; I have cooked a good deal of pork loin recently, so it'll be a while before I go back to it, but will certainly try this. I recall we often used milk and/or buttermilk to marinate wild game when I was a child; it toned down the "gamy" taste and added a level of tenderness not see otherwise.

 


Don't ask. Eat it.

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6 hours ago, Josh71 said:

 

I have to try this!~

 

Serve this with mashed potatoes, do you think that nice? Or any better idea? :)

 

Or perhaps with potato rosti for a bit chruncy texture.

 

 

I served it with braised cabbage, but I think mashed potatoes would be wonderful with the sauce! :)

 

 

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Inspiration.

 

image.jpeg.63d58ec7e2333e43067593adf462427d.jpeg

 

 My loin is much smaller than called for so I was a little kerfuffled as to how long I should cook it. In the end I have given it the same amount of time as in the recipe.  I based my decision on a vague recollection from early sous vide days that cooking time depended on the "cylindrical mass"?  And I suspect that the onions will need sufficient time at such a low temperature.   We shall see. I have been known to chicken out on my decisions as to timing.  My bar totally let me down failing to produce cognac or brandy.  I settled for Calvados.

 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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After an illness, Wattle the cat turned off on eating his raw kangaroo mince (had to be kanga, never would touch beef or turkey) but he now is ravenous for 60 C sous vide chicken breast. I bought an inexpensive sealer from Aldi since I'm no longer a Costco member to buy freezer bags and am quite happy with it.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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"Settled for Calvados"?  Tough day huh?  Big Smiley.

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New PT gig at high end caterer.  On day 2 I became the SV "expert"  Ha!

 

Client wanted gyros made from leg of lamb.  Procured four boneless legs, seared them, bagged them w rosemary and garlic / garlic oil.  In the bath for 8ish hours at 133F.  Sliced them very thin on slicer like deli roast beef.  I don't use the word "awesome" often but these were it.

 

I'm sure most here know lamb has a very small window of opportunity for when it's ideal.  Below 131F and it's a bloody mess.  Above 135 and it tastes like, uh, overcooked lamb.  I can get it in that window, most of the time, on the grill.  But SV is pretty much bulletproof.


Edited by daveb (log)
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13 minutes ago, daveb said:

"Settled for Calvados"?  Tough day huh?  Big Smiley.

 Yep I knew I was setting myself up for some teasing. I was actually quite surprised to find it in my bar.  It used to be a staple but given prices here in Canada this partial bottle will have to last me  to kingdom come.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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6 minutes ago, daveb said:

New PT gig at high end caterer.  On day 2 I became the SV "expert"  Ha!

 

Client wanted gyros made from leg of lamb.  Procured four boneless legs, seared them, bagged them w rosemary and garlic / garlic oil.  In the bath for 8ish hours at 133F.  Sliced them very thin on slicer like deli roast beef.  I don't use the word "awesome" often but these were it.

 

I'm sure most here know lamb has a very small window of opportunity for when it's ideal.  Below 131F and it's a bloody mess.  Above 135 and it tastes like, uh, overcooked lamb.  I can get it in that window, most of the time, on the grill.  But SV is pretty much bulletproof.

 

So I take it you had no off tastes using garlic and rosemary in the Sous Vide bag? 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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No off taste to me.  

 

There seem to be two schools of thought on seasoning in the bag.  Most writers will tell you to bag it and bath it then season before searing.  I'm in the minority in that I almost always add a small amount of seasoning /.herbs going into the bag.  Does it make a difference?  I like to think so but would not argue it.  I also use bag juices in sauces for product and can smell / taste the seasoning there.  Simply put it works for me..

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ive both seasoned in the bag and not seasoned.

 

for short cooks  :  < 4 hours    ( an arbitrary number )  Ive had no off tastes nor corning.

 

this was for beef , chicken , and turkey.

 

I don't season for longer cooks   > 6 hours   more like 24 - 48 .

 

I can't say this is perfect but its working for me.

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On February 17, 2017 at 11:46 AM, Anna N said:

image.jpeg

 

1.  Boneless beef short ribs from Costco. You see them here being seared before being bagged. I also double bagged them.  Why so many precautions? These were about 1 1/2 times more expensive than the equivalent weight of prime rib! I don't know what possessed me. Anyway they are being cooked at 60°C  for 48 hours.

 

2.   A small, just over a kilogram, boneless, pork shoulder roast. I am cooking it at 62.8° for 6 1/2 hours. I also seared it on all surfaces. This will be my first time doing a pork shoulder roast Sous Vide. 

 

@Anna NI saw these a couple of weeks ago at Costco and bought a package which I packaged and vacuum sealed in sous vide bags and put into the freezer.  After that, I went back to your post and saw that you seared them prior to cooking them sous vide.  Today I was there again and bought a second package.  My question now is, do you sear them and then cook them all sous vide and then freeze them?  Or do you only pre-sear the ones you are consuming immediately after cooking them sous vide?

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1 hour ago, ElsieD said:

 

@Anna NI saw these a couple of weeks ago at Costco and bought a package which I packaged and vacuum sealed in sous vide bags and put into the freezer.  After that, I went back to your post and saw that you seared them prior to cooking them sous vide.  Today I was there again and bought a second package.  My question now is, do you sear them and then cook them all sous vide and then freeze them?  Or do you only pre-sear the ones you are consuming immediately after cooking them sous vide?

If I were consistent I would be so much more helpful!   If I recall correctly there had been much discussion of problems with long cooks.  At about the same time we discussed the mechanically tenderized meat at Costco. I believe the two discussions together caused me to think that a pre-sear would be a good idea.   I do not recall ever doing a pre-sear prior to this!   So I pre-seared both the ones I was going to eat immediately and the ones that went into the freezer.  


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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@Anna N. Thank you.  I will pre-sear these four strips and see how that goes.  We will eat one likely on Tuesday and I will freeze the rest.  They look lovely - I hope that they eat as good as they look.  They certainly weren't cheap.

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