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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


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8 minutes ago, rotuts said:

maybe S. of the Border cows are different.  Ive never seen short rib meat that meaty 

 

relatively pricy , you bet.  just not meaty.

 Are they not amazing? Look at the marbling in them. I have bought stewing meat from Costco that was equally well marbled and incredibly good.  These were AAA grade which is about the highest grade usually available to consumers. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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once Im down 2 - 3 shelves with the FCO project , I have some ideas about visiting Costco.

 

short ribs would be on my short list  ( ive never made them SV ) as would Cap Meat.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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1 hour ago, Anna N said:

image.jpeg

 

1.  Boneless beef short ribs from Costco. You see them here being seared before being bagged. I also double bagged them.  Why so many precautions? These were about 1 1/2 times more expensive than the equivalent weight of prime rib! I don't know what possessed me. Anyway they are being cooked at 60°C  for 48 hours.

 

2.   A small, just over a kilogram, boneless, pork shoulder roast. I am cooking it at 62.8° for 6 1/2 hours. I also seared it on all surfaces. This will be my first time doing a pork shoulder roast Sous Vide. 

 

Lucky you.  I love short ribs, bone in or out, but I have never seen them at the Costcos here.

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2 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

Lucky you.  I love short ribs, bone in or out, but I have never seen them at the Costcos here.

 First time I have seen them. They also had blade roast and pork shoulder roasts.  I have never seen the "cheaper"  cuts of meat at Costco before.  

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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@Anna N 

 

look into that blade roast at some point.

 

its the most beefy flavorful meat outside of a double prime rib eye.

 

there is a tendon down its middle , as its two muscles that keep the scapula down

 

its easy to remove the central tendon , then then you get 2 - 4 killer tasty steaks depending you you remove that tendon:

 

A ) slice down the middle to the tendon , then rotate your thin sharp knife 90 degrees and run it along that tendon

 

this give you 4 as you can see.

 

but you can tie two together making a nice bundle for SV then Chgar.

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21 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 First time I have seen them. They also had blade roast and pork shoulder roasts.  I have never seen the "cheaper"  cuts of meat at Costco before.  

 

Anna, thanks.  I haven't looked at their meat lately as I have been trying to eat what is in the freezer.  But when I buy beef it is usually at Costco and I will be going there on the weekend so I'll have a look for them.  Same with the pork shoulder, another favourite cut of mine that I haven't seen there.  Strangely, I never buy chicken there except for the odd cooked one.  That I buy at my Italian grocer.  I do buy lamb chops at Costco.

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9 hours ago, rotuts said:

@Anna N 

 

look into that blade roast at some point.

 

its the most beefy flavorful meat outside of a double prime rib eye.

 

there is a tendon down its middle , as its two muscles that keep the scapula down

 

its easy to remove the central tendon , then then you get 2 - 4 killer tasty steaks depending you you remove that tendon:

 

A ) slice down the middle to the tendon , then rotate your thin sharp knife 90 degrees and run it along that tendon

 

this give you 4 as you can see.

 

but you can tie two together making a nice bundle for SV then Chgar.

Isn't that a flat iron steak?

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15 hours ago, rotuts said:

@Anna N 

 

look into that blade roast at some point.

 

its the most beefy flavorful meat outside of a double prime rib eye.

 

there is a tendon down its middle , as its two muscles that keep the scapula down

 

its easy to remove the central tendon , then then you get 2 - 4 killer tasty steaks depending you you remove that tendon:

 

A ) slice down the middle to the tendon , then rotate your thin sharp knife 90 degrees and run it along that tendon

 

this give you 4 as you can see.

 

but you can tie two together making a nice bundle for SV then Chgar.

Perhaps there is some confusion on nomenclature. Not unusual with meat. I did not look closely but blade here seems to have replaced chuck as the nomenclature of choice. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Im sure you know this , but take a look here :

 

if you look at a 7-bone chuck :

 

http://www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com/ibccut.aspx?id=90525#

 

7b.jpg.7b78f212402b09e297c6749e6537daf5.jpg

 

this is the blade , sliced , under the scapula:

 

7b1.jpg.5fdaa75db1f93e4546167da9f2e4f6f7.jpg

 

note the thick tendon that runs down the middle and separated two different but similar muscles 

 

so then that m muscle is sold whole its a blade roast i think in most of thee USA.

 

what's it called in Canada ?     its well worth look for.

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I saw that episode and agree.

 

my mother was not a great cook , as she enjoyed gardening more.  but we always had a home made dinner , unless we went to Kirk's

 

the finest burger joint ever created.  my sister and i always had a hot breakfast w consisted of two poached eggs  9 over poached in one of those

 

little pan thing-ids w 4 inserts , on day old toast and maybe a minute steak.

 

she did make outstanding Swiss Steak  , probably from top round , and maybe flank steak  as those were very cheap back them

 

I used to make 7 bone swiss steak when i started out cooking for my self.  the 7 bone was not as thick as on SM, but it was very tasty

 

brown weak , brown onions , a couple of cans of beef broth , garlic  3 hour or so  flipping once.

 

I had no idea of the different muscle groups , but it pays to learn,

 

most ' blade ' sold in the stores if cut across the grain and sold that way.

 

a zillion years ago , Madeleine Kamman   had a PBS cooking show,  J.Pepin with a much higher voice !

 

she did blade steaks , of which Id never head of , but in the French Manner , the meat was always trimmed and sliced for Sur le Plate.

 

she cut out the tendon , and said " This is for your Dooge  ( i.e. dog ) and yes , a Black Labrador was waiting the woofed the tendons down in mid air

 

if you can find a nicely trimmed whole roast , it worth learning how to take out the tending , and then cook the rest of the meat

 

sometime tied back up , SV or  the top steak folded into a unifor mass and grilled over high heat.

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Next time I am in Costco, which I hope won't be quite as long as the year it took me this time, I shall have a look at their blade roasts.  If I have my wits about me I may even take a photograph.  

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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as soon as im Two Shelves Down, i'll be planning a reconnaissance to Costco.

 

Ill arm myself , not being a member , w a members gift card, which Ill cover.

 

I eat very little beef , not for health reasons , but because what I can get is way over prices for what cooks up.

 

im more than willing to pay a little more for a lot more tasty meat.

 

at one of my MegaloMarts , some time ago , which I documented , they had blade roasts very nicely trimmed , on sale a al choice meat.

 

I asked the butcher about these that rarely showed up.  he said they were prime, and came in a regular  box of meat.

 

he showed me the primal.   and the meat.  he said from time to time they get prime ' primals ' mixed into the chose boxes.

 

he trimmed me up  4  blade roasts right then an there.  I SV'd them after removing the tendon.

 

I still have 3 in the freezer down stairs.  I of course took the butcher two that Id SV'd and asked him to get them sliced thin at the deli.

 

he did.  said it was the best roast beef sandwich he had had in a long time.

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@Anna N I just came back from Costco and alas, they did not have short ribs.  I asked about them and was told they had some about a month and a half ago and they haven't seen them since.  The did have blade roasts and pork shoulder roasts, two per package.  There are four other Costcos within a short drive and I plan on calling all of them if need be, to find out if they carry them.  Not being able to get some made me feel a little bit sad.

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17 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

@Anna N I just came back from Costco and alas, they did not have short ribs.  I asked about them and was told they had some about a month and a half ago and they haven't seen them since.  The did have blade roasts and pork shoulder roasts, two per package.  There are four other Costcos within a short drive and I plan on calling all of them if need be, to find out if they carry them.  Not being able to get some made me feel a little bit sad.

 I understand your disappointment regarding the short ribs but I do hope they continue to carry such things as blade roasts and pork shoulder roasts. I have a sneaking feeling that their demographic might not support meat that requires time  and patience.xD

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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if you find a blade roast , thats nicely trimmed , and in your budget for red me dat , at a place that you've gotten decent meat

 

please consider it.

 

its easily to remove the tendon , which is de rigueur  

 

the first time won't be as much fun as the second.

 

the second time you will remember how the first one rated !

 

money-mouth.gif.52b4cbc82d4679e8f76b838107a40820.gif

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On February 10, 2017 at 0:55 PM, weedy said:

I not only noticed that, I tweeted to a few modernist chef's about it for comment. 

Will be interesting to see if anyone responds. 

I personally think that both Collichio and Sean Brock are just traditionalist and predisposed to dislike the IDEA of SV. 

 

 

 

 

 

Tom C is half FOS esp after a few glasses of wine.  Great chef, but he says silly things...like the silverskin on a pork tenderloin should be left on because "fat is flavor". Or SV dries meat out. But he's in a position where nobody tells him to get stuffed. 

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Is it also possible that we're taking this out of context? Among Collichio's friends are chefs he'd probably admit to being at a higher level than than he is, and who cook a lot of meat sous-vide. It's hard to imagine him holding onto (and blurting out) such small-minded and sweeping statements on the matter.

Notes from the underbelly

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He's not the only chef (including some I greatly admire for their FOOD) who are borderline antagonistic to modernist techniques even though they can be friends with modernist chefs or like the food when someone else makes it. 

 

Even today you'll hear some seriously talented chefs still spouting nonsense about washing mushrooms or 'searing locking in juices' etc. 

 

it is an art. Not all the artists understand the science. And some don't CARE to. 

 

In my world too I still know some old hold outs (and I'm not young!) who seem to think learning new technology or techniques might somehow pollute their work. 

 

Edited by weedy (log)
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2 hours ago, paulraphael said:

Is it also possible that we're taking this out of context? Among Collichio's friends are chefs he'd probably admit to being at a higher level than than he is, and who cook a lot of meat sous-vide. It's hard to imagine him holding onto (and blurting out) such small-minded and sweeping statements on the matter.

Agreed.

But he said it.

In vino veritas

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35 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

@Anna N. Best stock up on those beef short ribs!  I called the other four Costco's in my area and none have them and none show them as being on order.

 No guarantee they still exist in my Costco! And getting a ride to Costco is almost as challenging as getting beef short ribs.xDxD

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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