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AlaMoi

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Everything posted by AlaMoi

  1. started reading, then gave up due to the exponentially increasing nits. too many many ignorant assumptions-be-truth for any seriously consideration. in decades and decades I've been to one and exactly one eatery that printed a daily menu, tossed on closing. even if they did, the energy and resources required to manufacture a tablet-for-the-menu is going to kill the planet much faster. "in Germany they need to eat more organs . . " newsflash: in the land of Wurst ueber Alles, virtually nothing of an animal goes to waste. you can have it on your plate or in your sausage - but it's not thrown away.
  2. happy to help. be aware - book matched veneer of the width shown for a table . . . that's not currently available. my g-g-grandparent generation had a lumber and millwork business in the Catskills. being the baby of the baby of their families,,, I have multiple pieces passed down from them. so when dithering over 'to do or not to do...' it's a no brainer. an expensive no brainer . . . DW has a 'family hutch' from the 1800's - dated/signed by all the relatives in possession down the line... that's another 'no brainer' - touch it NOT..... from a great aunt, I have a McDougall "Hoosier Kitchen Hutch" from the 1920's. intact, never refinished - it's another item that fits the DO NOT TOUCH category. whether to touch or not touch such items is a decision that may be based on market value. basically it boils down to whether to cost of expert restoration has worth to you - and whether 'restoration' may/will destroy the value. note however, 'doing no harm' is a perfectly valid approach - keep it - use a cover-up - the underlying piece remains there as before. those are things so dependent on individual situations many many thousands of pages needed to 'cover all the options'
  3. sigh. any natural wood and/or stained wood will change color over time and with exposure to strong(ish) light. I made desks&office furniture 'to suit' our sun-room "office" - had to move the printer every couple weeks to avoid having a permanent 'discolored' spot. so, that's a fact of nature and there's no ducking it except by keeping it covered. obvious the top + extensions/inserts/leaves + etc can be refinished - eliminating/minimizing/hiding scratches and color changes. from the photo, the top appears to be book matched veneer. that's a big red caution flag - veneer is thin. a woohoo yahoo with a belt sander can grind through the veneer in seconds, causing permanent, non-repairable damage. for refinishing, seek out a very experienced/reputable craftsman - it'll all be hand/slow power tool work and that = $$ if there's going to be a noticeable color shift, include all the chairs (?) leaves and etc with the effort. meanwhile, enjoy a table cloth! changes the room / decor to suit the season/occasion/whim. you'll need different sizes for with/without leaves/extensions. perhaps that explains the 400 million DW has piled up in the closet . . . ?
  4. sorry - there's no such thing as "best" honey predominately 'harvested' from clover, alfalfa - any one of dozens of trees, flowering shrubs, etc etc . . . will have a different taste same honey in raw form vs 'refined' will taste different. seeking "just VT honey" will narrow down the rather long list of blossom tastes - simply because not a lot of Eucalyptus grow in VT, , , for example. which flavor work best for what dishes/ingredients.... well, that's why your name is "Yes, Chef!" a local bee keeper could assist - the state ag people can put you onto less local keepers/associations/groups that should have a broader outlook on 'what makes a good honey in VT' oh, just to keep you on your toes, the honey will be different year-to-year . . .
  5. I much prefer the rotating handle type to the wrist-twist design. originally had a William Bounds model; the handle chrome plating flaked off; email requesting info on 'better model' went unanswered so I've got the OXO Good Grips model. it has a click detent fineness adjustment - switching coarse to fine back to coarse is very repeatable. just recently ditched an old wrist twister for white pepper with the same OXO. one long term note.... the OXO has a clip on plastic bottom tray. very effective, but over time all things plastic tend to distort. I have to be 'aware' it will pop off easily - minor nit, but a nit.....
  6. nope. same incident. I'm insufficiently anal to keep track of where I when posted what....
  7. we had a CA vacation planned. while doing SF I thought - "Heh - let's go to the French Laundry!" so I started on that quest some 5 months ahead of time. the web didn't work; it was "under construction" for 5 months. no answer to emails. no one ever answered the telephone. sent a USPS letter - no answer, no response, no reaction. so, so far as I'm concerned the French Laundry aka Thomas Keller simply does not exist. the man, the legend, has obviously outgrown his britches.
  8. I could be tempted to try a seafood pizza - we're veddy fond of shrimp, clams, oysters, scallops, Ches blue claws . . . my Flammekuchen uses creme fraiche - that tends to thin down/melt, not sure it's a good base for a "white pizza" I can see popping the pizza&sauce in a hot oven to get it started, then add the seafood later so it does not rubberize.... so....whadda' ya'll use for a seafood "white pizza" sauce? (I'm from Philly - not much history of white pizza to judge,,,,,)
  9. people who have pizza four-10 times a week probably need 'something new and different' I do total from scratch pizza at home every 4-6 weeks and the classic (but quality) ingredients work, every time. a white pizza - in our case unleavened FlammeKuchen - completes the satiating . . . a not-so-local Wegmans has real (imported) Speck - spatterings of "things genuine" . . .
  10. sigh. I was hoping one or the other new fangled stuffs would have a wider "working range" obviously bakeries mass producing are not using local, just peeled peaches - and likely have a procedure to 'measure' free liquid and 'adjust' their recipes to make the perfect pie.
  11. or not. I put up 10-12 dozen ears of bi-color as it peaks. also piques my sous chef attn....
  12. I'm looking for a thickener that will work with 'really juicy' to 'meh. dry' peaches. I only do peach pie/cobbler/etc. with local fresh peaches. they vary in 'liquid' any x teaspoon/tablespoon per pint/quart/pound guidance type stuff is utterly useless - not because I can not follow 'it' - but because the underlying ingredients do not cooperate. once more into the valley of death . . . anyone have a technique / ingredient that is 'self-adjusting' to the moisture content of the peach? something like . . . thickens to the 'perfect' degree and ignores turning drier stuff to concrete mush? or, alternately, some method to judge how much juice the peach-in-hand will produce, so one - using x tablespoons per quart/pound - will work?
  13. we've used flour / cornstarch / instant tapioca (it's ground/pulverized 'pearls') it's always a guessing game as to how much to use because fresh peaches can/do vary widely in juiciness.... @curls - is the ClearJel more forgiving as to qty?
  14. Four Roses cook book here, scroll down for 1915 edition - veddy pricey.... https://www.alibris.com/booksearch?mtype=B&keyword=Five+Roses+Flour+cookbook&hs.x=22&hs.y=18
  15. we don't use much salt in the home cooking - which really shows up unpleasantly when we go out. most of the dishes are way over salted for our tastes.... not a dietary restriction type thing - just low salt user tastes . . . I hear there's a 12 step program for the green can problem.....
  16. the "need" to thin a blade comes from the depicted: no electric or jig "sharpening" doohickies "thin" the blade. to thin a blade, long, arduous work on stones, or quicker work on belt type grinders is required - and it's not a good starting task for the inexperienced. electric powered sharpeners tend to remove a lot more metal than hand sharpening, and hence can cause the need to "thin the blade" - much like 20-30 times sooner - than hand sharpening. for those interested in acquiring the basics of edges and sharpening, look for Chad Ward's "Knife Maintenance and Sharpening" available here: https://forums.egullet.org/topic/26036-knife-maintenance-and-sharpening/
  17. there is no such thing as a male or female eggplant, or pepper, for that matter. it is an invention of some totally ignorant-but-need-another-200-words-for-my-column writer that has morphed into urban legend. the larger the eggplant, the more likely it will have an unpleasant seed cavity. there are many botanical variations/hybrids of eggplant - so unless you wish to make a really deep dive into what-is-which, buy small(er)
  18. AlaMoi

    Beef Rib Primal

    well, since there's only two fourth ribs per cow and only two fifth ribs per cow and only two sixth ribs per cow they're right.
  19. AlaMoi

    Beef Rib Primal

    presuming the resto is marginally obvious about describing the meat, there are very few options for more than the rib bone. - a chunk of spine is left on - it's cut from further up in the shoulder to the point more 'bone' / 'bones' are included. I'm missing how the spruceeats in so far in error. virtually every source I have found cites the chuck eye steak being cut from less than the 6th rib area. sources also state 'be sure to get a boneless cut' - so the whole thing is a gigantic mess of essentially no detailed information from the OP combined with local / resto naming conventions.
  20. AlaMoi

    Beef Rib Primal

    I'm totally lost on this thread. Dave seemed to indicate IMPS/NAMP has no such thing - but according to their pubs 1116H Chuck, Chuck Eye Steak
  21. AlaMoi

    Beef Rib Primal

    from USDA: USDA SELECT AND CHOICE BEEF CUTS DATASET.XLSX Chuck eye steak, select, raw 23079 24 71.4 (1.4) 21.3 (1.4) 6.47 (1.4) 0.98 (0.1) Chuck eye steak, select, grilled 23076 24 61.4 (2.9) 27.9 (2.4) 9.77 (1.9) 1.03 (0.2) Chuck eye steak, choice, raw 23078 48 69.5 (1.7) 21.3 (1.7) 8.29 (2.0) 0.92 (0.2) Chuck eye steak, choice, grilled 23075 48 60.4 (2.0) 28.0(3.0) 11.5 (2.7) 1.03 (0.2)
  22. AlaMoi

    Beef Rib Primal

    one can also buy a boneless prime rib. I don't believe I mentioned or quoted multiple bones, but name the other prime rib cut that includes multiple bones: _________________ the only way to get multiple bones is to cut further into the clod - i.e. lower rib numbers. of course, all this overlooks the possibility that the resto is simply untruthful about the cut.
  23. AlaMoi

    Beef Rib Primal

    suspicion: https://www.thespruceeats.com/chuck-eye-steak-336251 " What Is Chuck Eye Steak? Tender rib-eyes come from the sixth to twelfth ribs of a cow; butchers cut the chuck eye from the fifth rib. This proximity means the chuck eye steak shares many of the characteristics of a rib-eye. Although chuck eye steaks aren't always available—there are just two per cow—they tend to be a budget-friendly cut of meat when you can find them. "
  24. the big health inspector thing is stuff from above dripping onto stuff below . . . so they will insist the "contact" can be 'in motion'
  25. salmonella is found on the exterior of the egg - which is the source of not using cracked eggs - salmonella may have 'entered' the egg... except that it was found that an infected hen could produce an interior infected egg. worse, not consistently - one contaminated, the next not contaminated. which in UK and many other European countries is very very rarely a problem because the hens are vaccinated - in the USA eggs must be kept under constant refrigeration because . . . the hens are not vaccinated. USDA graded eggs are also washed, which removes the natural exterior barrier on the shell. which is why people in most countries other than USA do not keep eggs in the refrigerator.
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