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The Hot Sauce Topic

Condiments

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265 replies to this topic

#241 phatj

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 06:25 PM

If the ingredient label can be believed, it contains no citrus. Water, SB peppers, modified food starch, onion, garlic, salt, acetic acid.

#242 Raamo

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 04:10 PM

Thanks Phatj, I'll have to pick up a SB some time to play around with :)

#243 TylerK

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 11:11 AM

Over the past month or so I've been trying to acclimatize myself to hot foods and hot sauces.  I'm making some progress I think.  Currently in my fridge I have (in order of hotness according to the web) Frank's Original, Jalapeño (green) Tabasco,  Sriracha and Cholula, and I'm able to enjoy them all for the most part.  I'd like to keep going, but I have a few questions I was hoping some of the resident hot sauce experts could answer.

 

1. The order in which I listed the above sauces was according to scoville units I was able to find on the web.  This is not the order I would have given based on my perception of their hotness.  I would have placed them something more like this:  Jalapeño Tabasco, Cholula, Frank's Original, Sriracha.  Any idea why my perception of the heat would be different than the scoville ratings?

 

2. I'm finding it more difficult to get used to the acid and salt in some of these sauces, particularly the Frank's and the Tabasco.  Can you suggest other products that might be more to my liking?

 

3. I think I'm ready to move on to something hotter.  What should I be looking at next?

  



#244 chileheadmike

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 11:36 AM

Your ranking is in line with mine as far as heat levels.

El Yucateco is my go to sauce. Neither too vinegary or too salty, but plenty of heat.

ETA: I really don't care for flavor of sriracha. I must be the only one.

Edited by chileheadmike, 14 March 2013 - 11:37 AM.

That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

#245 TylerK

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 11:50 AM

I didn't mind the Sriracha, if only because it was the least salty/sour and so had less of a tendency to overpower the taste of the food I was putting it on.  My favourite so far has been the Cholula.  Toasted/buttered english muffin with a soft boiled egg and the Cholula on top was amazing.  

 

How hot is El Yucateco compared to what I've tried so far?


Edited by TylerK, 14 March 2013 - 11:52 AM.


#246 annachan

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 02:15 AM

Different brands of sriracha taste quite different. I've always used Rooster brand before. Tried Shark brand recently really did not expect it to taste so different. I'm quite liking the Shark brand.

#247 Hassouni

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 08:04 AM

I didn't mind the Sriracha, if only because it was the least salty/sour and so had less of a tendency to overpower the taste of the food I was putting it on.  My favourite so far has been the Cholula.  Toasted/buttered english muffin with a soft boiled egg and the Cholula on top was amazing.  

 

How hot is El Yucateco compared to what I've tried so far?

Considerably hotter, especially the Kutbil-Ik one, but even the regular bright red and green. I'd say El Yucateco are the hottest sauces you can get at a supermarket.  

 

Different brands of sriracha taste quite different. I've always used Rooster brand before. Tried Shark brand recently really did not expect it to taste so different. I'm quite liking the Shark brand.

 I got a bottle of Shark brand and threw it out. It was much too sweet and not nearly hot enough.  For what it's worth, this is the original Thai style of Sriracha (or in Thai, Si Racha, which is a place in Thailand). That said, for a while now I've found Huy Fong Sriracha rather insipid and too garlicky.

 

By the way, I think Huy Fong Sriracha absolutely overpowers the taste of food to which it's added. One reason I like Yucateco is because you need less of it for the same heat level, and it doesnt have that signature "sauce" taste, it's very similar to straight habanero flavor.  

 

For Southeast Asian dishes, I'm more likely to slice up some thai chiles rather than use Sriracha (I do use it sometimes, though).

For Chinese stuff I use Lao Gan Ma chili oil (which also has Sichuan peppercorn and other lovely solid crunchy bits in it), and for Japanese/Korean I typically use either shichimi togarashi, or chile infused sesame oil aka "la yu/rayu"


Edited by Hassouni, 15 March 2013 - 08:09 AM.


#248 Ttogull

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 08:32 PM

Your ranking is in line with mine as far as heat levels.El Yucateco is my go to sauce. Neither too vinegary or too salty, but plenty of heat.ETA: I really don't care for flavor of sriracha. I must be the only one.

We must be brothers. El Yucateco first, and I want to like Sriracha but just can't.

I have more than 50 bottles of hot sauces, not including backups of my favorites. I pick them all for taste, and specifically exclude any that have names meant to appeal to "show-offs". Cholula and Tabasco are probably the mildest I have, and the hottest are varied. I have a couple of bhut jolokia.

For me, the flavors are very roughly divided by pepper, vinegar, carrot, and mustard. Can't tell you why. The habanero family is my favorite. And for most applications, I prefer no vinegar. This fits El Yucateco perfectly, although they do have jalapeno too. So there is red hab, green hab, and xxx hab, which I guess is really more roasted. I think if you were to use just use normal bell peppers and compare the flavor differences among red, green, and roasted, you'd have a good idea of the differences in these sauces.

When it comes to breakfast, though, for some reason I like vinegar, especially with eggs. I love Marie Sharp for this. Some have carrot, and some not. For me, the carrot makes a big difference, but which I choose depends on the food and my mood. Habanero ketchup is a good idea. I use Melinda's, but I don't think it is special.

Finally, there is mustard. If you want hot mustard, you have to try Lottie's. Absolute fantastic taste. But it might as well be called Lottery's, because 3 bites might be mild while the 4th burns your face off. Really great with hot dogs. I have a couple other Carribean mustards that are nice.

I am less familiar with Asian-style sauces, so I mean no insult by not mentioning them.

ETA: one of my favorites is Two Flaming Arrows, labeled an authentic Indian product from New Mexico. No idea about that, but it's like Tabasco with real taste and heat, and goes well with greens.

Edited by Ttogull, 27 March 2013 - 08:40 PM.


#249 annachan

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 02:27 AM

I happen to like the sweetness in Shark brand sriracha. It's not for everything, but it works well in dishes that I don't want as much heat. I also like dipping prawn crackers in it. I have others in the pantry when I want the heat.

#250 chappie

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 04:50 PM

Has anyone here had Dirty Dick's? http://dirtydickshotsauce.com Amazing, sweet, hot and fruity. I wish it came in a sriracha-type squeeze bottle.



#251 lindag

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 06:36 AM

I love all kinds of hot sauce except for the regular Tabasco.  The chipotle style Tabasco is a lot better.

I just got a new one that I was hearing a lot about, Secret Armadillo Sauce; so far it's my all-time favorite.  Hot, but not too hot.



#252 rotuts

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 06:46 AM

Im a fan of green chili and vinegar.  so its tabasco green for me.  the chipotle is nice as a change-up.



#253 rx6006

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 07:13 PM

Perhaps I'm stubborn in clinging to old habits, but I'll never lose my love for regular old Tabasco. While I think siracha is being done to death at the moment, I think it still has its place, judiciously used of course. 


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#254 MasteringTheFlame

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 11:20 AM

I do like siracha on certain things. The first time I ever had it was at my work's lunch room. I put some on my hashbrowns and it was great.

 

For the most part my old standby has always been Tabasco, and I imagine that will more than likely always be the case. I do like trying all kinds of hot sauces, but always come back to Tabasco.

 

I have this hot sauce I use on my eggs quite a bit called Tapatio. It was cheap and in a 32oz. bottle. It's not bad, but nothing special.

 

Another one I have in the frig that I should just throw away is called Submission. It's made with Habanero, African Oleoresin, and Scotch Bonnet. The stuff is hot, but it tastes just awful. I don't ever use it because it tastes so bad and wreaks anything I add it to because of its flavor.



#255 rx6006

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 03:32 PM

I do like siracha on certain things. The first time I ever had it was at my work's lunch room. I put some on my hashbrowns and it was great.

 

For the most part my old standby has always been Tabasco, and I imagine that will more than likely always be the case. I do like trying all kinds of hot sauces, but always come back to Tabasco.

 

I have this hot sauce I use on my eggs quite a bit called Tapatio. It was cheap and in a 32oz. bottle. It's not bad, but nothing special.

 

Another one I have in the frig that I should just throw away is called Submission. It's made with Habanero, African Oleoresin, and Scotch Bonnet. The stuff is hot, but it tastes just awful. I don't ever use it because it tastes so bad and wreaks anything I add it to because of its flavor.

 

Sauces that are hot for the sake of being hot are just wastes of good ingredients. If you enjoy Tapatio, try Cholula...great smoky flavor with the vinegar/pepper bite.


“You can’t define these in a recipe. You can only know them...”

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#256 MasteringTheFlame

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 05:08 AM

I do like siracha on certain things. The first time I ever had it was at my work's lunch room. I put some on my hashbrowns and it was great.

 

For the most part my old standby has always been Tabasco, and I imagine that will more than likely always be the case. I do like trying all kinds of hot sauces, but always come back to Tabasco.

 

I have this hot sauce I use on my eggs quite a bit called Tapatio. It was cheap and in a 32oz. bottle. It's not bad, but nothing special.

 

Another one I have in the frig that I should just throw away is called Submission. It's made with Habanero, African Oleoresin, and Scotch Bonnet. The stuff is hot, but it tastes just awful. I don't ever use it because it tastes so bad and wreaks anything I add it to because of its flavor.

 

Sauces that are hot for the sake of being hot are just wastes of good ingredients. If you enjoy Tapatio, try Cholula...great smoky flavor with the vinegar/pepper bite.

I completely agree. Thanks for the Cholula recommendation, I'll have to see if I can find that one.



#257 pastameshugana

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 07:57 AM

I didn't see it mentioned - so I'll put a plug in for the yellow canned El Pato. I grew up with it on everything my mother made.

 

Now I use it for: Marinating chicken, on any kind of mexican food, and to dip potato chips in!

 

It comes in the little yellow cans for usually about 50 cents at the grocery store.

 

Of course, I like sriracha in scrambled eggs and in a few other dishes.

 


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#258 chileheadmike

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 07:26 AM

I love El Pato. When I was a kid it wasn't available in KC. My uncle in Los Angeles would send it to us by the case. My first venture into chilehead-dom. Now it's available everywhere and there's at least one can in the pantry at all times.
That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

#259 pastameshugana

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 08:04 AM

I love El Pato. When I was a kid it wasn't available in KC. My uncle in Los Angeles would send it to us by the case. My first venture into chilehead-dom. Now it's available everywhere and there's at least one can in the pantry at all times.

 

Yes! My wife and I spent 2.5 years with the first three mini-meshuganas in India, and cases of El Pato were on the 'must pack' list.


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#260 andiesenji

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 03:07 PM

Check all IMPORTED hot sauces from Mexico and South America:  Apparently some contain LEAD, not an ingredient that adds to the flavor or the heat. 

The percentage of questionable products was only 16% but for some people this could be significant.

 

Of course one has to use good judgement.  Since one uses very little hot sauce (as a general rule - I'm not talking about extreme chile-heads) a tiny amount of lead consumed occasionally - for normally healthy adults, is not really dangerous. 

 

http://www.latimes.c...0,5156596.story


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#261 nickrey

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 04:37 PM

I'm not sure if you can get this in the US but one of my favourite hot sauces is Sambal Asli. The sauce comes from Indonesia and contains the usual suspects (chill, vinegar, sugar, salt). It is a bit more textured than Sriracha and to my taste a bit hotter. It can be found on the tables in most Warung (cafes).

 

sambal asli.jpg


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#262 Ttogull

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 06:31 PM

Check all IMPORTED hot sauces from Mexico and South America:  Apparently some contain LEAD, not an ingredient that adds to the flavor or the heat. 
The percentage of questionable products was only 16% but for some people this could be significant.
 
Of course one has to use good judgement.  Since one uses very little hot sauce (as a general rule - I'm not talking about extreme chile-heads) a tiny amount of lead consumed occasionally - for normally healthy adults, is not really dangerous. 
 
http://www.latimes.c...0,5156596.story


Noooooooooo! One of my go-to sauces is first on the list of highest lead concentration (and several of my others are the same brand). Unfortunately I eat it often enough that I should throw it all out. I'm ready to quit eating and hide in a cave.

#263 pastameshugana

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 07:11 PM

I just grabbed this on a whim at the local Hispanic meat market. It really is wonderful. Tastes of avocado, chile and lime. A touch of garlic and salt.

What really interesting is all of the kids and Mrs. Meshugana all said it reminded them of something from India. No one could place it exactly...

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1374804715.374102.jpg
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#264 Toliver

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 09:37 AM

Check all IMPORTED hot sauces from Mexico and South America:  Apparently some contain LEAD, not an ingredient that adds to the flavor or the heat. 

The percentage of questionable products was only 16% but for some people this could be significant.

 

Of course one has to use good judgement.  Since one uses very little hot sauce (as a general rule - I'm not talking about extreme chile-heads) a tiny amount of lead consumed occasionally - for normally healthy adults, is not really dangerous. 

 

http://www.latimes.c...0,5156596.story

Thanks for posting this. I always have a small yellow can of El Pato in my cupboard. Not anymore!  I know the story was about hot sauces, but it's likely they use the same lead-contaminated salt & pepper in the rest of their sauces, too. Better safe than sorry.



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#265 phatj

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 07:59 PM

I just grabbed this on a whim at the local Hispanic meat market. It really is wonderful. Tastes of avocado, chile and lime. A touch of garlic and salt.

What really interesting is all of the kids and Mrs. Meshugana all said it reminded them of something from India. No one could place it exactly...

attachicon.gifImageUploadedByTapatalk1374804715.374102.jpg

This reminds me of when I was on vacation in Mexico with my brother and sister-in-law, and we stopped at this roadside taco stand for lunch. They had squeeze bottles of sauces on the table, and my sister-in-law thought the green one was guacamole. Whoops.



#266 davidkeay

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 05:00 PM

I recently picked up a few kinds of portugese piri piri and am loving them. One is made in NJ and pretty expensive - Mazi's. The other, I picked up in new bedford, MA, and is very similar for about 1/8 the price. They're moderately spicy, oily, and very salty. It tastes like a fermented pepper sauce with capers in it. I haven't had nando's for years, but I don't remember it being anything like this... perhaps the south african and portugese recipes diverged a lot over time. 

 

I'm going to have to buy a few bottles next time I'm in MA, since the first one I got there didn't last long.

 

El Yucateco is definitely my go to sauce, though lately I've been using salsa habañera chimay de tabasco black and enjoying it a lot. I buy it online from a guy in texas who imports it. Black (mild, according to that seller) is the only jar I have open, and it's heat is easily on par with el yucateco. 







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