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"Japanese" Restaurants in Vancouver


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#1 Sam Salmon

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Posted 17 October 2004 - 07:17 PM

A person travelling around the city can't help but be amazed at the proliferation of 'Japanese' restaurants.
In the past month alone 2 new 'Japanese' places have opened up within in 10 minute walk of my place.
Already there were at least a dozen a 10 minute walk from 4th & Burrad (3 actually run by Japanese Chefs)-it's astounding that this fad hasn't hit bottom.
A quick calculation shows that at the present rate of expansion the year 2020 will see every Vancouverite with a private 'Japanese' restaurant-or each 'Japanese' restaurant with it's own private customer. :wacko:

Your thoughts?

#2 Jerry_A

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Posted 18 October 2004 - 07:37 AM

As long as they keep making them like Guu, Hapa, Kintaro and Gyoza King....bring it on!

#3 Coop

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Posted 18 October 2004 - 08:53 AM

This trend will continue until people stop going. That seems unlikely when talking about the places Jerry mentions.
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#4 Keith Talent

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Posted 18 October 2004 - 10:20 AM

I'm waiting for the day that Starbucks begin appearing in Japanese Restaurants, or maybe vice versa.

And there's a gas station here in Richmond that features a nice sushi selection in addition to the more traditional pepperoni sticks and jerky. If you dine of gas station sushi you're a far more adventurous eater than I. I basicly refuse to eat off those rotating sushi conveyors, nevermind sushi that's next to new wiper blades.

#5 Jerry_A

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Posted 18 October 2004 - 10:54 AM

And there's a gas station here in Richmond that features a nice sushi selection in addition to the more traditional pepperoni sticks and jerky.

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So do they have a little gas pump shaped soy sauce dispenser? That I'd like to see.

#6 butter

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Posted 20 October 2004 - 09:51 AM

I am happy to report that we now have our own neighbourhood Japanese restaurant; Toshi. Also, love Octopus Garden near Kits Beach. Their Mr. Bean is addictive. I lived in Japan for 7 years and the first time I bought sushi in Tokyo it was at a convenience store similar to 7-11 and it was paired well with a cold Asahi beer from a vending machine on the street. Don't have a problem with gas station sushi as long as the quality is there (the rice is so important). Instead of Starbucks with sushi, I would prefer to see a good sushi place with Mondo gelato.
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#7 peppyre

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Posted 20 October 2004 - 01:09 PM

Butter, Toshi is fantastic if you sit at the bar and let the chef make food for you otherwise it's OK. I'm repeatedly dissapointed with their Spicy Tuna. It's never spicy enough. Their cooked dishes are also better than any I have had. The Gyoza is very different from anything that you've ever had.

#8 montrachet

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Posted 20 October 2004 - 07:37 PM

I agree with Peppyre, at Toshi's you have to sit at the counter to enjoy their tiny place. The last time I was there, the 5 servers were bumping into each other as well as into the chairs of those seated. They must be making tons of money to absorb such labour costs.
Also, I hear that rice balls and sushi a la 7-11 are being considered for the North American market as we speak.

#9 butter

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Posted 21 October 2004 - 09:23 AM

I couldn't agree with you more montrachet and peppyre. I forgot to mention that I usually don't eat sushi there and I have only been there for lunch. I prefer the hot food. The agedashi tofu is delicate and the tempura, fresh and crispy. Mmmmm. Will try a dinner at the counter and let you know. As for the service, yes, we went just after it opened and an article appeared about them in a newspaper (can't remember which one) and they definitely didn't expect the crowd. We probably waited more than 45 minutes for our food. We weren't working that day, but for the people who were taking a lunch break from work it was very obvious they weren't happy campers.

Regardless of the service, I love it in my neighbourhood (the best hood in Vancouver!)
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#10 Coop

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Posted 21 October 2004 - 09:56 AM

Can I get the address of this Toshi's? We need somewhere for an early dinner on Saturday.
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#11 peppyre

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Posted 21 October 2004 - 10:14 AM

Toshi's is a little tiny spot at Main & 16th. It's on the Northwest corner and the storefront is directly on 16th, right next to the alley. If you're feeling adventurous you will definitley enjoy it. The last time I was there, they had butterfish marinated in Miso in the dinner box special. Quite good.

#12 jamiemaw

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Posted 21 October 2004 - 10:16 AM

Can I get the address of this Toshi's? We need somewhere for an early dinner on Saturday.

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If it's the same one, 181 East 16th Avenue; 604-874-5173

Here's a link to Tim Pawsey's review here

Jamie
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#13 Sam Salmon

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Posted 21 October 2004 - 12:58 PM

Is this place Japanese or 'Japanese'?

#14 peppyre

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Posted 21 October 2004 - 01:15 PM

Define what you mean Sam. From what I understand, it's pretty "traditional". Every time I go, there is at least one person exclaiming that it's exactly like the food they had back in Japan. It's very different from any other place that I've been and I think the fact that his "western" style sushi isn't very good is an indication of that. The more traditional dishes are fantastic.

#15 jamiemaw

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Posted 21 October 2004 - 01:25 PM

Is this place Japanese or 'Japanese'?

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It's pretty much retro-traditional new-tsunami post-ironic redux Japanese, Sam, except, as Peppyre explained, when it's not.

Edited by jamiemaw, 22 October 2004 - 01:18 PM.

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#16 Sam Salmon

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Posted 21 October 2004 - 07:03 PM

Japanese means run/staffed by Japanese people-or if you prefer people of origin in Japan (apart from some few Koreans).

'Japanese' means anyone of origin in Asia who's taken a basic course in Sushi making/'Japanese' cooking.

#17 Keith Talent

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Posted 22 October 2004 - 01:44 PM

Ate at Nan Chuu, the Richmond Gyoza King spinoff the other night. Out-freaking-standing. So good. More refined than the Robson branch, seems more like Hapa ver. 2.0 rather than Gyoza King. The interior looks very similar to Hapa, dark, modern and cool in the way that makes you forget you're in the middle of strip mall hell.

Menu seems similar, all the Talent family favourites were there, but prepared in a far more delicate sophisticated manner. Ebi Mayo was presented in a potato basket so delicate, greaseless and crispy that it didn't seem strong enough to hold the shrimp. Fatty pork belly came in a sauce so rich and fragrant that I'm thinking of petitioning the inlaws to sub it for the usual lumpy gravy at the christmas meal.

Gyoza unimpeachable, as expected. Somen came toped with the usual assortment of Japanese condiments, plus one I'd never had before. A thick gel of salty plum, well for lack of a better descriptor, slime. I loved it, salty and sweet, other family members were less taken with the concept. Rice hot pot (something I've never had on Robson) was insanely delicious. Mound of rice, studded with the usual Japanese pickles/garnishes, served in a cast iron pot over a flame, which you dump miso broth over. Kinda a Japense version of congee, I dunno, I've never seen it anywhere else. Perfect dish to finish a meal of small plates, something that ensures you don't leave hungry.

Also had bacon wrapped quail eggs, (is there anything bacon wrapping doesn't improve?), toro and cow tongue, (which was grilled as opposed to braised at Robson).

Tax, couple drinks, $55.00 plus tip.

It's fair to assume that my input will be diminished, I don't see myself having much to say about anywhere else for the forseeable future.

It's on Alexandra Road (which seems to have a bunch of new restaurants I haven't tried pop up recently.) Next door to the Kam Do Bakery, across from the Sheraton hotel.

Reservations required.

And I coundn't tell if it was Japanese or Japanese. Good looking waiteresses regardless.

#18 Chef Metcalf

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Posted 23 October 2004 - 12:09 AM

Maybe this plethora of Japanese restaurant openings is similar to the influx of Chinese/Asian Style restaurants that sprouted up in the 1920's through 2004?
The good survived, the mediocre did not.
Perhaps the same will run true for this epidemic Sam? :cool:

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#19 jamiemaw

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Posted 23 October 2004 - 08:47 AM

Maybe this plethora of Japanese restaurant openings is similar to the influx of Chinese/Asian Style restaurants that sprouted up in the 1920's through 2004?
The good survived, the mediocre did not.
Perhaps the same will run true for this epidemic Sam? :cool:
Chef M

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An intersting observation Chef Metcalf, because while Japanese-styled restaurants (both sushi- and izakaya-driven) have bred quickly--there are now more about 315 in Vancouver), Chinese restaurants, especially at the fine dining level, have seemingly consolidated. So while Keith had a truly memorable izakaya-styled meal at Nan Chuu, it makes one wonder where, depite ubiquitous noodle shops, many of the high end Chinese restaurants went.

To find out why, it's probably best to follow the money. Between 1986, when Hong Kong Chinese began to intensively invest here (with an eye to the turnover of their city in 1997) and the mid-90s, we saw the greatest surge of formal Chinese dining rooms, especially downtown. The Business Immigration Program (which allowed queue-jumping in exchange for invested capital in "approved" programs), fostered some of the growth. There were lin-ups for ESL programs in Lower Mainland elementary schools. Concorde Pacific began marketing its condo towers on the north shore of False Creek, often with show-and-tells in Hong Kong. Three hundred dollar bowls of shark fin and Monk-Jumpoing-Over-The-Wall soups, Johnny Walker Blue Label and expensive cognac lit up downtown nights. Why I remember it as if were only yesterday.

But then something happened. The real estate market hit some speedbumps in the early 90s, other investment opportunities did not support the Chinese entrepreneurs who had moved their families here (they became known as astronauts--with kids in school here, they commuted to Hong Kong for work). But the killer for many new immigrants, especially entrepreneurial ones, was the very high Canadian taxation, anethma to someone used to paying little tax.

The result was that some of the high-flying Chinese chefs who had followed the money here moved back home. In the face of diminishing competition, well-financed Chinese restaurants prospered, but several downtown, unable to pull the white crowd consistently, did not, and the nexus of Chinese fine dining, with a few notable exceptions, would move to Richmond.

So why did sushi and izakaya win? I think because they're more accessible, less expensive and, at the most basic level, require less skill (it's sort of like vocabulary--we don't use that many words day-to-day and sushi diners seem to order the same dozen items). They fit the modern mold of casual dining in the Lower Mainland, and goodness knows the Japanese have been better marketers: plastic meal models and photographic menus are a national pastime, and have made it much easier for we occidents-waiting-to-happen to see in advance exactly what we are ordering.

Jamie

PS--Elsewhere on this sub-forum, we thrashed out exactly how to determine if you're eating in a Japanese or Japanese restaurant. Lesson One: Ask the cut-man where he got his knives. What you want to hear is "thirty years ago at the end of my seven year apprenticeship in Kyoto." If they say KIA or LG on them, you may be in in the wrong place.

Edited by jamiemaw, 23 October 2004 - 09:53 AM.

from the thinly veneered desk of:
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Vancouver magazine

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Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

#20 Daddy-A

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Posted 23 October 2004 - 11:17 AM

So why did sushi and izakaya win? I think because they're more accessible, less expensive and, at the most basic level, require less skill (it's sort of like vocabulary--we don't use that many words day-to-day and sushi diners seem to order the same dozen items).


The "less skill" comment made me raise an eyebrow for a second, until I realized that most of my exposure to Asian cooking has been through Iron Chef and The Rickshaw. My perceptions as such were that Cheinese cooking was more about noodles and dumplings, while Japanese cooking was something more akin to high art. Yet, while Iron Chef does its best to push Japanese as the ultimate cuisine (it almost always reigned supreme :biggrin: ) Chef Kennichi introduced me to a whole other world of Chinese cooking.

Back to the topic at hand ... I think another reason Japanese cuisine may have out-performed other Asian styles has to do with texture. Sushi aside, items like tempura and kaatsu are closer texture-wise to Western textures than say ... some of those jellied creations I see in authentic Chinese food. The texture of sushi, while not completely familiar at the time to Western palates, was not "icky".

The bottom line is that I don't know if I would like high end Chinese. I've never really had it (I must try Shark Fin soup one day) but my perception is that it would be something I would have to get used to.

A.

#21 peppyre

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Posted 23 October 2004 - 03:32 PM

Sam, I was at Toshi again last night and the entire staff is from Japan. I was asking one of the servers that very question as she was writing down my name in Japanese characters. It's worth trying out if you can.

#22 montrachet

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Posted 23 October 2004 - 04:55 PM

Still not sure as to which type of "Japanese" restaurant you prefer Sam. Would it be the ones run by native Japanese who may or may not have any background in the preparation of authentic cuisine or the new breed of non-Japanese establishments run by those who have a basic concept of what works for the masses here in Vancouver. The resourceful ones can emulate, up to a point, many of the key aspects required to dish out "real" Japanese cuisine and then there are others who are able to surpass the offerings put out by a vast majority of mediocre Japanese places. As mentioned earlier, a good point is to ask the chef as to the origin of his weapon and if you get a viable answer, then ask for the "Omakase" course and let your palate be pampered. Don't bother asking either question in a restaurant that has a poster in the window advertising 18 pieces of sushi and miso soup for $5.95.

#23 nwyles

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Posted 23 October 2004 - 11:17 PM

Here is a rather sad note for a Japanese restaurant. :sad:

My wife runs with the group at the Running Room on Denman.

Yoshi's is right above the Running Room.

They called tonight to say that Yoshi is on a 2 week vacation and his freezer has broken down. The smell is incredible :wacko:

I feel for the chap who has to come back from vacation to that. I sure hope someone is able to get ahold of him. That would be a nasty surprise.
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#24 Chef Metcalf

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Posted 23 October 2004 - 11:30 PM

Changing the direction of the subject ever so slightly....why is there no Robata-Yaki restaurants in Vancouver?
When I lived in Japan these were always some of our first picks.
The chef would sit/kneel in front of a grill.
Around the grill was all manner of fresh fish and vegetables that could be chosen by the customer to be grilled.
The customers sat semi-circle around the food and grill and watched the chef cooking then passed your fare to you on a wooden paddle.
Some of my best food memories of Japan come from Robata-Yakis ( and dining at Paul Bocuse for an outrageously expensive but wonderful seven course lunch one day).
Are there any in Vancouver? I think I have seen robata on a few signs, but are they authentic with the chef sitting in front of the customers?
Or is that just too much for the Vancouver Health Board to clear?

Jamie
But are the Chinese high end restaurants really authentic?
Seldom are the meals here ever as good as what I have eaten in Hong Kong and I always feel that they probably go back to the kitchen and notify them that the customer is a farang/gaijin/whatever.
Case in point.....last night we went to Kirin Mandarin.
We ordered a couple of dishes that should have had heat.
They were tame at best (although the lobster in garlic tomato sauce was very good....there was no zing).
The spicy tangerine peel beef, bland by my heat standards.

I guess I always think of how Chinese food was horribly Westernized by the Chinese restaurant owners to please our sensitive lilly white pallets that grew up on TV dinners and Macaroni and Cheese (or in my case, pressure cooked vegetables...no wonder I started cooking).

I think I need sleep, this is just drifting in all directions.

Ciao

Edited by Chef Metcalf, 24 October 2004 - 08:54 AM.


#25 jamiemaw

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Posted 24 October 2004 - 03:01 PM

Changing the direction of the subject ever so slightly....why is there no Robata-Yaki restaurants in Vancouver? . . .
Are there any in Vancouver? I think I have seen robata on a few signs, but are they authentic with the chef sitting in front of the customers?
Or is that just too much for the Vancouver Health Board to clear?

Jamie
But are the Chinese high end restaurants really authentic?
Seldom are the meals here ever as good as what I have eaten in Hong Kong and I always feel that they probably go back to the kitchen and notify them that the customer is a farang/gaijin/whatever.
Case in point.....last night we went to Kirin Mandarin.
We ordered a couple of dishes that should have had heat.
They were tame at best (although the lobster in garlic tomato sauce was very good....there was no zing).
The spicy tangerine peel beef, bland by my heat standards.

I guess I always think of how Chinese food was horribly Westernized by the Chinese restaurant owners to please our sensitive lilly white pallets that grew up on TV dinners and Macaroni and Cheese (or in my case, pressure cooked vegetables...no wonder I started cooking).

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Two main questions here I think Chef Metcalf:

1. Yakitori restaurants actually preceded the ubiquity of sushi parlours in Vancouver. They may have even pre-dated the Ding Ho Drive-Ins (remember: where urban myth had it that neighbourhood cats mysteriously disappeared when they ran a special on sweet and sour "boneless pork".) For many of us, yakitori was the first reference point for "Japanese" cuisine, much as the exotica of the Ho Inn revealed the mysteries of China. And yakitori's main proponent, Kobe on Alberni--the house of the flashing knives--is still going today I think. It doesn't feature highly on my screen, because personally I can do without the histrionics aka "showmanship" -- I prefer my rythymic gymnastics to be demonstrated by young women twirling ribbons and not men with sharp cleavers. BTW, Kobe uses a huge griddle at each station, not a grill. You're seated around it, and if you're a good sport, sometimes with people you don't know. Pretty easy to replicate at home but use real charcoal and a slowish fire.

If I remember the story correctly, the reason that you were presented your food on a paddle goes something like this: Japanese fishermen cooked their dinners at sea over hibachis but ate off their oars. No washing up, but tricky if a storm blew through during dinner.

There are lots of robata dishes available around town. But sometimes the robata is performed in the back kitchen (or occasionally in front of you over those little BBQs that look like jimmied toaster ovens) where the tempura is also cooked. The most typical dish is miso-marinated smoked cod (sablefish), which, when properly done over a medium-hot grill, comes off like butter. My favourite of all time was at Yoshi's on West 4th; he is now at the Bluewater Raw Bar, although, come to think of it, I haven't ordered it from him there because I'm usually too busy with his albacore--straight up or gomae.

Places with robatas: Aki at 745 Thurlow, perhaps the most authentic-feeling of the lot; Kamei Royale (1030 West Georgia, 2nd Floor); Mitsubishi (755 Burrard--entrance off Alberni) and Japone Japone (8260 Oak Street).

The three most common cooking styles represented locally are sushi-dominant (I'm sure you have your favourites); izakaya (bistro food like Hapa, Guu, Shiro-Bay, Japone et al); and okonomiyaki cafes that serve Japanese "pancakes" and other kitchen food. The two best of these are Modern Club at 18th and Dunbar and Clubhouse at 2nd and Alberta.

Here's an interesting website for young Japanese that describes favourites, many with an eye toward thrift.

2. How to order Chinese food is no more complicated than going out with Chinese friends or developing a relationship with a Chinese proprietor. Another alternative if you're worried that you're only seeing the Chop Suey/White Girl menu is to walk the room and, when you see something interesting, point and shoot, i.e. tell your waiter. That will guarantee that they turn up the heat and that you'll get plenty of tendon in your soup.

But as a white guy with a Chinese name, there's no better way than getting to know, say, Allan at Sun Sui Wah, the guys at Pink Pearl (I had a formidable Chinese meal there last year including Monk-Jump-Over-The-Wall soup, which I'm still paying for), or just the place in your neighbourhood. I've got the guys so well trained at my local in ForMiCa (Triple XXX-tacy Fortune Gardens) that they call me when a fresh shipment of salmon eyes is inbound, or to warn me when they're about to change the pickling fluid for the fermented geoduck spleens. Makes a snappy vinaigrette.

OK. Gotta go. The Seahawks are losing to the Cardinals, of all people, and clearly they require that I focus.

Hope this is helpful,

Jamie

Edited by jamiemaw, 24 October 2004 - 04:53 PM.

from the thinly veneered desk of:
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Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

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#26 Explorer

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Posted 24 October 2004 - 04:35 PM

Jamie- Another question: Why aren't there Kaiseki type Japanese restaurants in Vancouver like this one for e.g.? Hashimoto (Toronto)
Thank you.
"I hate people who are not serious about their meals." Oscar Wilde

#27 jamiemaw

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Posted 24 October 2004 - 06:16 PM

Jamie- Another question: Why aren't there Kaiseki type Japanese restaurants in Vancouver like this one for e.g.? Hashimoto (Toronto)
Thank you.

View Post


Explorer,

In matters of culinary sociology I frequently defer to my longtime colleague and friend Dr. Tom Celica, the acclaimed Japanese-Canadian Dean of the University of BC’s Faculty of Culinary Anthropology and Modern Living. What Tom doesn’t know about Asian cuisines in the New World doesn’t amount to a hill of azukis. And yes, to answer your next question, the Toyota Celica was indeed named after his grandfather, the famous automotive engineer who invented the 8-way electric car seat and the hatchback.

I wasn’t surprised to find the disciplined, hardworking Celica at work at his office on a Sunday afternoon. Below is his report, but first it might be useful to explain to other eGulleteers that Kaiseki is a formal, highly-stylized, small plates Japanese dining dialect, based on both Buddhist and Tea ceremony traditions.

“Dear Jamie,

Good to hear from you with this interesting query. I trust the family is well.

Despite the tremendous proliferation of both Japanese and Japanese (and for that matter Japanese) restaurants in Vancouver, Kaiseki dining never really got a foothold here as compared to Toronto for the following reasons:

1. Vancouverites (as opposed to Torontonians) have more a sense of taste than one of occasion: the formality of the kaiseki ceremony is not really something we feel comfortable doing in cut-offs and a wifebeater.
2. Vancouverites have much bigger appetites than Torontonians, borne out by Statistics Canada’s data that states that Vancouverites spend about 35% more per capita in restaurants than their eastern neighbours. Of course this explains a lot of things, but especially that Vancouverites simply don’t find the kaiseki morsels filling enough and generally go home only two-thirds full. But we’re not without manners. Many locals find it awkward, even disrespectful to the highly trained kaiseki master chef to stop for a Whopper on the way home. So many of us go to bed hungry after kaiseki. I mean, have you ever had a Japanese cheese course?
3. If you’ve been through a Japanese tea ceremony or a kaiseki ceremony once, it’s unlikely that you’d rush back the next night as the seating is uncomfortable. So Japanese restaurant proprietors in Vancouver have been investing in brand extension in other areas, such as airport neck massages, sushi vending machines and wasabi ranches.
4. Although the hockey strike has deeded us a lot of extra time, many Vancouverites are dedicating it to other pursuits this winter such as water-skiing and gardening.
5. Vancouver is not an expense account town on the scale of Toronto and few of us can afford kaiseki without government subsidy.
6. The vertical presentation that kaiseki affects has been out of favour here on the coast since the Eisenhower administration. We prefer a more “landscaped” look on our dinner plates and hence the popularity of whole fish such as halibut.
7. Once Air Canada put kaiseki in their “Hospitality” Class service, we thought it was time to move on.
8. And we thought that having Celine Dion as a spokesperson for kaiseki was a bit much. Marcel Dionne maybe.
9. Because we have drinkable wines at this end of the country, it represents another challenge. The profusion of rapid fire kaiseki micro-portions is difficult to marry to quality wines, so many Vancouver kaiseki patrons ended up just drinking Lucky Lager. And, needless to say, that didn’t really seem like going out.

Notwithstanding the above, Jamie, there are Japanese restaurants such as Yoshi’s on Denman Street that will deliver a quality kaiseki experience. But I should share an amusing story with you. It seems that Yoshi, whose premises are immediately above a workout gymnasium called The Running Room, was having difficulty getting the gym sock and stale bra smell out of his restaurant. Apparently he tried everything, from Lysol to scented candles, each to no avail. So, in a fit of pique, he pulled the plug on his fish freezer and went on vacation for two weeks! You’ve got to love the guy.

I trust this will answer Mr. Explorer’s query satisfactorily.

Your comrade in izakaya,

[signed--'Tom']

(Dr.) T. K. Celica
Faculty of Culinary Anthropology and Modern Living
University of British Columbia"


Explorer--May I suggest that the next time you’re in town that you buy Dr. Celica a couple of pints for sharing these valuable insights. Hope this helps you out—Jamie.

Edited by jamiemaw, 24 October 2004 - 06:51 PM.

from the thinly veneered desk of:
Jamie Maw
Food Editor
Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com
Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

#28 Explorer

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Posted 24 October 2004 - 07:56 PM

Thank you Jamie and Dr. Celica for a very insightful response. I wasn't necessarily looking for a sociological satire on Toronto vs. Vancouver, but
it appears that the art of the Kaiseki isn't well suited to North America in general as these comments would apply elsewhere. I personally have enjoyed the experience, but even Toronto has only 1 remaining Kaiseki restaurant; the other one opened and closed within months with a chef that used to work with Toji's.

Jamie, I will be in Vancouver next week. Did you receive my other pm's? Where can I meet Tom....does he really prefer beer to sake?
"I hate people who are not serious about their meals." Oscar Wilde

#29 jamiemaw

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Posted 24 October 2004 - 09:31 PM

Thank you Jamie and Dr. Celica for a very insightful response. . . Where can I meet Tom....does he really prefer beer to sake?

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Heavens no, he only drinks that premium ginjo-shu artisanal stuff called Giggling Geisha. About $79 a pint as I recall from the last time he did me a favour. Tojo's?

Kampaii!

Jamie
from the thinly veneered desk of:
Jamie Maw
Food Editor
Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com
Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

#30 montrachet

montrachet
  • participating member
  • 171 posts
  • Location:Hawai'i

Posted 24 October 2004 - 10:20 PM

Where would I be without that 8-way electric car seat indeed!
Not saying that it's good or anything but check out Zakkushi which opended up a couple of months ago on Denman. It's a yakitori specialty house has hit the scene just across the lane from Dairy Queen. The place is chock full of young Japanese clientele being served by even younger Japanese servers. Although they seem to be using real charcoal in the cooking process, I still miss the almost-like-in-Japan experience that I had at Yakitori-ya in Santa Monica this past summer.
If and when Chef Kobayashi does come back from his "vacation", give Yoshi a call and try out the mini-Kaiseki that they serve at lunchtime and then decide whether to try out the dinner time extravaganza.
Another pint of sake please!