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Making Limoncello

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435 replies to this topic

#421 jacko9

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 05:30 PM

I would like to try adding one or two green unripe Eureka lemons to my recipet for batch four. I was wondering if anybody added one or two Meyer lemons to the recipet?

I also want to go back to Katie's original and add one lime to batch five but, I need to wait for my two trees to give me some more great fruit!

Jack

#422 antdad

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 06:08 AM

Hi

I haven't read through this whole thread although I've been using Katies limoncello recipe for a while now (thanks). I've been thinking would grapefruit work?

To my taste it may lend itself to a great sweet 'n' sour liquer all on its own but not sure if oil levels in the peel are suitable and so how many to use.

#423 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 10:14 AM

So, I finally got around to filtering and mixing the stuff I put on, oh, what was that? Nearly a year ago? No matter - the long extraction process doesn't seem to have hurt it any, and the peels in the jar have gone to a blah-beige colour, which was unexpected. Here's my finished product:

Limoncello1.jpg
(please ignore the mountain of dishes I haven't put away yet...)

And here's my question: most of y'all show off cloudy, sunshiney Limoncellos. What's the trick? Did I need to add the simple syrup while it was still warm?
Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
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#424 blue_dolphin

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 12:21 PM

....
And here's my question: most of y'all show off cloudy, sunshiney Limoncellos. What's the trick? Did I need to add the simple syrup while it was still warm?


I've made half a dozen or so batches and all have looked like yours. Some have been more bright and yellow, others more golden. I've used lemons from the farmer's market, from the grocery store and, most recently, from my own tree. Never a cloudy batch yet but they have all been very tasty!

#425 KatieLoeb

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 04:47 PM

Hi

I haven't read through this whole thread although I've been using Katies limoncello recipe for a while now (thanks). I've been thinking would grapefruit work?

To my taste it may lend itself to a great sweet 'n' sour liquer all on its own but not sure if oil levels in the peel are suitable and so how many to use.


I would probably take off the grapefruit zests in thin strips with a very sharp vegetable peeler to get as little bitter pith as possible. Maybe 3 or 4 grapefruits total?? I'm sure it would work, just not sure what it would taste like at the other end. Might have to adjust the sugar levels to account for more bitterness to start. Please do report back! I think this might be an excellent idea and could make for a very interesting cocktail ingredient.

Katie M. Loeb
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Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

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#426 HungryC

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 05:55 AM

For a limited time, Ben Mazzola's ebook on making limoncello is free at Amazon. Get yours before then end of the week---it stops being free on Nov 19th. Get it here: http://www.amazon.co...omparisonsho-20
Ben is the guy behind the Limoncello Quest website... http://limoncelloquest.com/

#427 jacko9

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 02:25 PM

....
And here's my question: most of y'all show off cloudy, sunshiney Limoncellos. What's the trick? Did I need to add the simple syrup while it was still warm?


I've made half a dozen or so batches and all have looked like yours. Some have been more bright and yellow, others more golden. I've used lemons from the farmer's market, from the grocery store and, most recently, from my own tree. Never a cloudy batch yet but they have all been very tasty!

I have now completed my 6th batch using lemons from my tree and recently from Costco and all batches have been cloudy.  I let my neighbor taste some and he went out and bought lemons to make a batch himself which came out clear.

 

First of all, I used way more lemons than the recipe called for and went through multiple filtering.  My neighbor, used the same recommended number of lemons but, added 3 bottles of 150 proof Everclear and his came out clear.

 

I think that the amount of zest to alcohol ratio influences a percipitation that causes the cloudy appearance.  To test my theory, I will add another bottle of Everclear to my cloudy batch and see if it clears up.

 

Does anybody else have an explanation for the cloudy/uncloudy appearance?

 

Jack



#428 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 02:56 PM

I use 100% grain alcohol (so what's that, about 190 proof?) and stuff it more than right full with lemon zest, and I always get a clear result.  However, I allow much longer for infusion than most (2-3 months is normal) before triple-filtering and adjusting.  I am on my 20th or so batch now (my friends can't get enough of the stuff!) and all have been clear.

 

The almighty internets have an answer for us!

 

Homemade limoncello contains terpenes, a class of volatile organic compounds that are soluble in 30% ethanol or higher mixtures.  Once you dilute the solution to less than 30% alcohol, they fall out of solution - what you see as "cloudy" is the precipitate.

- from http://ask.metafilte...from-this-cloud

 

This makes sense - I keep my limoncello around 50% alcohol, so the terpenes never precipitate out.  Now I'm really tempted to try a "light" batch, adding water and simple until I do get clouding.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

#429 bostonapothecary

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 07:27 AM

I use 100% grain alcohol (so what's that, about 190 proof?) and stuff it more than right full with lemon zest, and I always get a clear result.  However, I allow much longer for infusion than most (2-3 months is normal) before triple-filtering and adjusting.  I am on my 20th or so batch now (my friends can't get enough of the stuff!) and all have been clear.

 

The almighty internets have an answer for us!

 

 

Homemade limoncello contains terpenes, a class of volatile organic compounds that are soluble in 30% ethanol or higher mixtures.  Once you dilute the solution to less than 30% alcohol, they fall out of solution - what you see as "cloudy" is the precipitate.

- from http://ask.metafilte...from-this-cloud

 

 

This makes sense - I keep my limoncello around 50% alcohol, so the terpenes never precipitate out.  Now I'm really tempted to try a "light" batch, adding water and simple until I do get clouding.

 

another variable causing the haze could be pectin. i'm not so sure that terpenes will make the spirit cloudy if the alcohol content goes below 30% so much as separate as an insoluble oil at the top. but it could take a long time to separate so maybe it just starts as cloudy.

 

joseph merory in his book "food flavorings" describes his terpene separator which is just a large conical separator. i'll have to check and see what exactly he does with it. commercial distilled triple-secs go through terpene separation even though they are above 30% in alcohol. i think they do it to make the aroma consistent and stable.


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#430 bostonapothecary

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 06:54 AM

it turns out that limoncello is economically significant enough that a few chemists have studied it in depth. I found two papers on the subject and put some bullet point summaries of the good bits on my blog.

 

the research unfortunately doesn't give suggestions or systematically explore the best way to make it, they just observe what is already on the market, but that is still useful.

 

there is definitely no terpene removal in limoncello production because terpenes are a major feature of the product. the papers unfortunately do not touch upon pectin in the peels and I suspect all it really takes to avoid pectin is removing all the pith from the peels.

 

the second paper discovers that many of the syrups producers are using to sugar their products have significant microbiological activity going on... gross!


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#431 olmoelisa

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 08:58 AM

My recipe for Limoncello (but also Arancello and Mandarinetto, orange and tangerine) Cream Liqueurs:

 

Ingredients (for the orange cream liqueur):

1 liter of alcohol at 95º
1/2 liter of milk
1 liter of fresh cream
8 oranges
1 cinnamon stick
6 ½ cups of brown sugar

 

Peel the oranges with a zester or a vegetable peeler so there is no white pith on the zests.
Put the orange zests, the cinnamon and the alcohol in an airtight jar.
Let soak for 2 weeks in a cold and dark place.
Filter.
Boil the milk and the fresh cream with the brown sugar, till the sugar is dissolved.
Let cool and filter.
Add to the alcohol and let rest for 2 weeks.
Serve chilled.
 
 
To obtain Limoncello (lemon) Cream Liqueur substitute the orange zests with 12 lemon zests and use a vanilla bean instead of the cinnamon stick.                                                                                                                                 
 
To obtain Mandarinetto (tangerine, THE BEST ONE) Cream Liqueur substitute the orange zests with 12 tangerine zests (6 ripe and 6 green) and use only half cinnamon stick, a clove and a pinch of grated nutmeg.       

  My Italian Homemade Liqueurs and Pastries recipes at: http://italianliqueurs.blogspot.com.es


#432 blue_dolphin

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 08:22 AM

Has anyone had much experience with infusing herbs in their 'cellos?  I saw Abra's effort upthread to perk up a Meyer 'cello with bay or lavender.  I love the combination of citrus and rosemary and have been wanting to try something like that.

 

I found Thinking-Drinking's recipe for  Grapefruit and Rosemary 'Cello and am going to give it a go.

 

In my experience, herbs usually need only hours to days to infuse full flavor vs. the weeks I usually give to limoncello so I thought I'd infuse the citrus until it's done and then add the rosemary for a shorter time at the end.  I'll also use rosemary infused simple to sweeten the 'cello.  I want the rosemary flavor to be fresh and piney, but not too woody if that makes any sense.  It may be better to just add some rosemary right before serving but I want to  bottle some for Christmas gifts so I thought I'd give this a try.  Anyone have any advice to share? 

 

And just to add to the collected 'cello experience here:  Since moving to a home with several citrus trees, I've been making what I thought was limoncello.  I knew the yellow fruits weren't the standard Eureka lemons as the pulp was slightly greenish but assumed they were just another variety of lemon.  Turns out I've been making Bearss lime 'cello, using the fully ripe yellow limes!  

It's a very nice 'cello and my favorite way to serve it is poured over a small scoop of lemon sorbet and one of vanilla ice cream.  Mmmmmm!



#433 pants

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 01:17 AM

I've been making Katie's limoncello recipe very successfully for a couple of years now, so far always using Meyer lemons. For the latest batch I used Yen Ben, as we have just started getting enough fruit on our tree. Problem is, it is not lemony enough. Not sure if it is the lemon breed or maybe I added slightly more extra vodka than usual. My question is ... can I fix it? The lemons are now finished, but I have plenty of frozen juice and was wondering if I could add a bit of sugar syrup made from the juice. Any help much appreciated - it's OK to drink but not as good as we are used to.

#434 KatieLoeb

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 10:14 PM

Most 'cellos are about extracting the oils from the peels.  The juice isn't really part of the recipe.  You could always infuse more peels in vodka and just add that to boost the flavor in your not-lemony-enough 'cello.  As for the juice, make lemonade!!  Or lemon curd.  Or freeze in an ice cube tray for when you need just a little bit of fresh juice and don't have fresh lemons in the house.


Katie M. Loeb
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Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol


#435 pants

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:29 PM

Thanks. I thought this might be the case. Problem is I need to wait till next season for a new batch of lemons ... Or buy some at the supermarket, which just wouldn't be the same!

#436 Danne

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 05:26 AM

I've used the recipe in the beginning of the thread, I think it was 12 lemons per 75 cl of alcohol, I used 40% vodka (only thing I can get), Ialso used a vegetablepeeler and removed all of the white pith afterwards. Now 45 days later I strained it. It's not that pleasant and fresh as the commercial limoncellos I've had, it's actually a bit bitter. I'll make a new batch soon, but this'll only be marcerating for 2 weeks.
Has anyone else had the same problems that I've had.?

Also I read the tip about adding hot sugarsyrup to the limoncello so it would becom cloudy. Didn't work for me. 

It's a shame, it looked so good. =(







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