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Infusions, Extractions & Tinctures at Home: The Topic


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#481 Quesmoy

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 02:10 PM

I just made a small batch of Death & Co's jalapeno-infused silver tequila. I can't get the specified tequila locally so I went for the affordable-but-acceptable Espolon instead. 

That sounds interesting and good, would you mind sharing how you did this?



#482 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 02:39 PM

That sounds interesting and good, would you mind sharing how you did this?

 

I made a small quantity but the base recipe falls for the ribs and seeds of four jalapenos, plus the chopped flesh of one jalapeno, to be infused in a bottle of silver tequila for about twenty minutes. You need to taste every so often to ensure the heat isn't overpowering.


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#483 Travis Jiorle

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 12:56 PM

This amaro recipe from the Washington Post looks good.

 

http://www.washingto...cucciolo/13646/

 

But it calls for a 75.5% abv vodka. It admits, "You may use a lower-proof alcohol, [but] don't go below 100 proof, though; the effect of the alcohol on the spices will be reduced." Fair point, but with no instruction to cut with water after steeping and filtering out the solids (which would, granted, dilute the flavor intensity), that's a 50-70% abv product! Most commercial amari are in the 20%-35% abv range.

 

I want to try this recipe, but that high abv just doesn't seem right. Any thoughts?



#484 EvergreenDan

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 01:57 PM

 that's a 50-70% abv product! Most commercial amari are in the 20%-35% abv range.

 

I want to try this recipe, but that high abv just doesn't seem right. Any thoughts?

If 3/4 of the volume contains 3/4 alcohol, then after adding the simple, it would be 9/16 alcohol, or 56% max. I'd find a 112 proof amaro pretty appealing, particularly if not too sweet.


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#485 lesliec

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 05:54 PM

That recipe is very similar to one I've made several times and yes, it does come out around 50% ABV after the simple is added.  Very serious stuff, but that doesn't stop it being delicious.  And it improves as it ages.


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#486 Travis Jiorle

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 01:41 PM

If 3/4 of the volume contains 3/4 alcohol, then after adding the simple, it would be 9/16 alcohol, or 56% max.

 

Oh, right—that recipe is 1/4 simple syrup!

 

And if starting with the lower abv base spirit of 50%, the final product's abv would be 37.5%, within the upper range of most commercially available amari in the U.S.

 

 

 

Very serious stuff, but that doesn't stop it being delicious.

 

Yeah, I think I'll try the higher-fire version first and see what that does.



#487 Travis Jiorle

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 04:33 PM

So I got all the ingredients for this amaro recipe—

 

http://www.washingto...cucciolo/13646/

 

—but I had to get liquid gentian root extract instead of gentian root, which was unavailable.

 

What would be the extract equivalent to the recipe's called-for 1/2 teaspoon of gentian root? The only info on the bottle is that the "botanical preparation ratio" is 1:4, and the ingredients are dried gentian root, distilled water and ethyl alcohol.

 

My guess is still 1/2 teaspoon, but I'm not sure. And of course I don't want to screw up this ingredient since it's the bittering agent, so too much could render the amaro unpalatable.



#488 Nut chef

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 03:03 AM

So if I want to make instant infusion,for example oil with herbs,vodka infused strawberry.... Would sous vide be better than isi whipper with N2O? Or equal.

#489 weedy

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 12:58 PM

I prefer the cold infusion in the ISI whip... it makes for a 'cleaner' more intense flavour in my opinion



#490 Hassouni

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 02:06 PM

isi is faster, but sous vide is not bad either. I dunno if I agree about the isi being more intense though. Maybe I just put a lower ratio of solids to liquids in the isi vs. jars when I did SV or old fashioned infusing. I should probably be more scientific than I am...



#491 Nicolas Escudero Heiberg

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Posted Today, 10:18 AM

Hey all, fascinating read./Apologies if this is not the right place to post my question, but it is my second post on the forum.

Planning on infusing some Thai chillies and some rosemary into vodka (2/separate infusions). I have an isi whip and N20 cartridges. I have 2/questions.

A) anyone have recommendations on how much chili/rosemary I should infuse

B) Any recommendations on recipes for the infused vodkas?

Many thanks!