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Dinner! 2013 (Part 5)


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#511 Steve Irby

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 06:13 PM

 

Here's a couple appetizers from dinner last night.  Boudin balls and roasted cauliflower.  The cauliflower is cooked sous vide then browned under the broiler. It's served with a goat feta spread.  The recipe is from Domenica in New Orleans.  The goat feta spread is the bomb.


.......
 
Steve, that appears to be a ralatively small cauliflower. Can you share time and temp for the SV step? Have previously attempted a whole cauliflower SV and it certainly needed much longer or a higher temperature. Thank you.

 

The cauliflower was relatively small. I took my largest pouch (12" x 12") to the grocery store to be sure I selected one that would fit.  I cooked the eggplant for about 40 minutes at a temp between 175-185.  I used a stockpot over a gas burner since I felt the cauliflower wouldn't be very temp sensitive and used a plate to keep it submerged.  After it was cooked it was held in the hot water until it was time to broil.  I going to try this again on Thanksgiving and go for more caramelization.  



#512 Ann_T

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 06:55 PM

Robenco15, not much better than a roast chicken dinner, and yours looks delicious.

 

Soy%20Sauce%20Noodles%20with%20Chicken%2

Soy Sauce Chow Mein with Chicken - following  HZRT8W's pictorial.


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#513 C. sapidus

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 08:44 PM

Whitefish pate – smoked whitefish, cream cheese, crème fraiche, butter, mustard powder, Chinese chives, black pepper, and roasted Poblano chile. Served with crackers and raw Belgian endive spears. We will definitely make this again.

 

p59529872-4.jpg

 

Browned Savoy cabbage with bacon, ham, and onions – cooked down with chicken stock.

 

p394220675-4.jpg


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#514 rotuts

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 07:57 AM

SI:

 

" goat feta spread "

 

If possible Id like to hear more about this.   i assume  " bomb " is good?

 

as compared to   "  bombed  " ??


Edited by rotuts, 26 November 2013 - 08:00 AM.


#515 Steve Irby

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 08:40 AM

SI:

 

" goat feta spread "

 

If possible Id like to hear more about this.   i assume  " bomb " is good?

 

as compared to   "  bombed  " ??

Here's the link. http://www.bonappeti...ped-goat-cheese  I'm going to make the spread later today and substitute robiola for the feta and use it as a filling in ravioli.  It definitely didn't bomb.  



#516 patrickamory

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 09:06 AM

Black chicken in dark soy sauce

 

black_chicken_zps7456eca5.jpg

 

black_chicken_cooked_zpsa56236cf.jpg

 

black_chicken_dark_soy_zps65d151fc.jpg


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#517 Steve Irby

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 09:59 AM

Black chicken in dark soy sauce

 

black_chicken_zps7456eca5.jpg

 

black_chicken_cooked_zpsa56236cf.jpg

 

black_chicken_dark_soy_zps65d151fc.jpg

That's a new one on me.  The broth looks great.  and does the bird.  Other than the obvious does the chicken have a different flavor or texture profile?



#518 huiray

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 11:46 AM

 

 

Here's a couple appetizers from dinner last night.  Boudin balls and roasted cauliflower.  The cauliflower is cooked sous vide then browned under the broiler. It's served with a goat feta spread.  The recipe is from Domenica in New Orleans.  The goat feta spread is the bomb.

.......
 
Steve, that appears to be a ralatively small cauliflower. Can you share time and temp for the SV step? Have previously attempted a whole cauliflower SV and it certainly needed much longer or a higher temperature. Thank you.

 

The cauliflower was relatively small. I took my largest pouch (12" x 12") to the grocery store to be sure I selected one that would fit.  I cooked the eggplant for about 40 minutes at a temp between 175-185.  I used a stockpot over a gas burner since I felt the cauliflower wouldn't be very temp sensitive and used a plate to keep it submerged.  After it was cooked it was held in the hot water until it was time to broil.  I going to try this again on Thanksgiving and go for more caramelization.  

 

 

Have either of you had access to mini-cauliflowers like these? ;-)  [I got these from a certain grower at my local Farmers' Market]

 

DSCN0029a_1k.jpg


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#519 huiray

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 11:49 AM

Black chicken in dark soy sauce

 

black_chicken_zps7456eca5.jpg

 

black_chicken_cooked_zpsa56236cf.jpg

 

black_chicken_dark_soy_zps65d151fc.jpg

 

So little rice?  :shock:   I would need at least five times as much, or more. 

 

Have you tried double-steaming black chicken in broth/water (which becomes broth) w/ various Chinese herbs?



#520 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 12:35 PM

Patric, thanks!  I've always wondered what a Silkie looks like plucked.  How was the flavour?


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#521 C. sapidus

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 06:18 PM

Shrimp vindaloo – cinnamon stick, bay leaves, and onions fried with a vinegary paste of garlic, ginger, fenugreek leaves, red pepper, ground cumin, ground black mustard seed, and turmeric. Add pureed tomato, reduce, and finish with shrimp and cilantro. Yum.

 

Green basmati rice – with pureed spinach, fenugreek leaves, cilantro, green chile, and S&P, finished with garam masala. Fresh fenugreek leaves were a pleasant find at the Asian market.

 

p486373438-4.jpg


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#522 Anna N

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 07:01 PM



Here's a couple appetizers from dinner last night.  Boudin balls and roasted cauliflower.  The cauliflower is cooked sous vide then browned under the broiler. It's served with a goat feta spread.  The recipe is from Domenica in New Orleans.  The goat feta spread is the bomb.

.......
 
Steve, that appears to be a ralatively small cauliflower. Can you share time and temp for the SV step? Have previously attempted a whole cauliflower SV and it certainly needed much longer or a higher temperature. Thank you.
The cauliflower was relatively small. I took my largest pouch (12" x 12") to the grocery store to be sure I selected one that would fit.  I cooked the eggplant for about 40 minutes at a temp between 175-185.  I used a stockpot over a gas burner since I felt the cauliflower wouldn't be very temp sensitive and used a plate to keep it submerged.  After it was cooked it was held in the hot water until it was time to broil.  I going to try this again on Thanksgiving and go for more caramelization.
 Have either of you had access to mini-cauliflowers like these? ;-)  [I got these from a certain grower at my local Farmers' Market] attachicon.gifDSCN0029a_1k.jpg
Don't I wish. I know Kerry Beal was able to source one like those at the market in Little Current on Manitoulin Island this past summer.
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#523 rotuts

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 07:06 PM

Im missing why you cant trim down a 'regular' cauli.  you know, around the rim.  trim the stem.

 

Who's going to know?

 

Just saying.  Its cauliflower, after all.  not a truffle on steroids.

 

:huh:



#524 liuzhou

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 07:16 PM

Patric, thanks!  I've always wondered what a Silkie looks like plucked.  How was the flavour?

 

Here is a plucked silkie.

 

silkie.jpg

 

And here it is butchered (to show the meat).

 

silkie2.jpg

 

I usually only use them for soups. Not much meat on them, but good flavour in stocks and soups.

 

Last night was duck. Slow braised in Kriek (Belgian cherry beer), with garlic, star anise, vinegar (to offset some of  the sweetness of the beer), fish sauce, chilli, ginger. Also had a few sprigs of cauliflower which needed using up, so they went in for a short time near the end.

 

duck in kriek.jpg


Edited by liuzhou, 26 November 2013 - 09:20 PM.

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#525 Shelby

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 08:37 PM

Those silkies are so cool.  I wish I could try one sometime.

 

A couple of meals:

 

Shrimp alfredo with some broccoli, shiitake mushrooms and red vinegar spinach

 

Image 1.jpg

 

 

I don't know the exact name of this….but I finally got my hands on some ground pork (I had NO idea how hard this is to find) so did a stir fry of sorts with it including garlic, mushrooms, peppers, onions and carrots mixed with some hoisin and ginger.    I served this on lettuce along with fried rice and egg rolls.

Image 3.jpg

 

Image 2.jpg

 

Image.jpg


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#526 huiray

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 10:53 PM

Shelby - ground pork is hard to find?  I suppose that must be so in your area, for it is one of the easiest things for me to get, both in the conventional Western-style supermarkets and the Chinese/"Asian" groceries around me.

 

Your meal(s) looks  nice!


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#527 liuzhou

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 12:18 AM

 

I finally got my hands on some ground pork (I had NO idea how hard this is to find)

 

Ground (minced) pork is easy for me to find, but I prefer to do my own. That way I know what's in it - and control the fat to flesh ratio depending on what I want to use it for.

 

In fact although I have a mincer, I seldom use it. I prefer the traditional Chinese two cleaver chopping method. A cleaver in each hand and set up a chopping beat Ringo would be proud of. I hear the sound all around me every day. 

 

Technically, I suppose it's pork haché. But it's easier to control the texture. And cleaning a couple of cleavers is a whole lot easier than cleaning the mincer.


Edited by liuzhou, 30 November 2013 - 12:43 AM.

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#528 Shelby

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 07:56 AM

Shelby - ground pork is hard to find?  I suppose that must be so in your area, for it is one of the easiest things for me to get, both in the conventional Western-style supermarkets and the Chinese/"Asian" groceries around me.

 

Your meal(s) looks  nice!

 

Thank you!

 

The regular store I go to does not have ground pork.  I look for it every time I go.  My husband found some at the Asian market in the big city.  Ground pork will now be a regular at our house.  I love it. 

 

 

I finally got my hands on some ground pork (I had NO idea how hard this is to find)

 

Ground (minced) pork is easy for me to find, but I prefer to do my own. That way I know what's in it - and control the fat to flesh ration depending on what I want to use it for.

 

In fact although I have a mincer, I seldom use it. I prefer the traditional Chinese two cleaver chopping method. A cleaver in each hand and set up a chopping beat Ringo would be proud of. I hear the sound all around me every day. 

 

Technically, I suppose it's pork haché. But it's easier to control the texture. And cleaning a couple of cleavers is a whole lot easier than cleaning the mincer.

 

I would love to make my own, too.  I even tried to find some cheap cuts at the store to do my own, but they didn't offer any.

 

I wouldn't have thought about using a cleaver.  I have a commercial grinder with the large hole attachment, I wonder if that still makes too fine a grind?

 

We butchered a hog a long time ago.  Guess it's time to check prices and see if it's feasible.


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#529 dcarch

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 08:51 AM

"-----In fact although I have a mincer, I seldom use it. I prefer the traditional Chinese two cleaver chopping method. A cleaver in each hand and set up a chopping beat Ringo would be proud of. I hear the sound all around me every day. -----"

 

Absolutely!

 

No setup time, not much to clean up afterwards.

 

You can chop enough for one meat ball, one burger, or for a big party.

 

​You can chop with all the other ingredients and seasoning all at the same time.

 

---------------------------------------------

Those of you who have not seen a live silkie chicken, Google Image, beautiful bird, very ugly without feather.

 

dcarch


Edited by dcarch, 27 November 2013 - 08:54 AM.

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#530 Kim Shook

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 09:20 AM

I’ve been gone a long time.  Lots of health issues, as some of you already know.  I ended up with a kidney stone (that is apparently what’s been going on with me since August) and am still recovering from the back injury.  I’m feeling much better – still really tired, but very little pain except for an achy back.  I actually made lemon chess tarts and mini quiches to put in the freezer for Christmas yesterday.  Mr. Kim is helping with the mise so that I can get things done. 

 

Sitting in a chair has been difficult, but I’ve been checking in from time to time and vicariously enjoying all of the incredible meals that you’ve all been making.  They have been inspiring and appetite stirring!  Thank you all for your good wished and I particularly appreciated your prescription, lesliec!

 

This is the first real meal I’ve made in a LONG time!  It was very simple, but I was glad to have done it finally.  Salad and brats with kraut and fried onions:

med_gallery_3331_114_92443.jpg

 

med_gallery_3331_114_85048.jpg


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#531 patrickamory

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 06:20 PM

Kim, those brats are mouthwatering. I've just eaten dinner and I could wolf one down right now!

 

Everyone who enquired about the silkie (black chicken): I followed a New York Times recipe that seemed decidedly odd, and called for jujubes and wolfberries (hong zao and goji), as well as some Indian dried spices, Thai bird chiles, galangal - and coca-cola! (I substituted dark beer with a little white sugar for the latter, per another recommendation I found online). I have no idea whether this sort of preparation is normal in mainland China. And the quantity of dark soy sauce was off the map. But it was certainly delicious.

 

I've eaten black chicken stew or soup at restaurants and have found the flavor and texture full and rich - sort of like double chicken. I will definitely be making this again, probably in a simpler style.


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#532 Norm Matthews

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 08:44 PM

The 'kids' are both working tomorrow so turkey dinner was today.

 

DSCN1020_zpsf75afb72.jpg


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#533 liuzhou

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 12:05 AM

 

Everyone who enquired about the silkie (black chicken): I followed a New York Times recipe that seemed decidedly odd, and called for jujubes and wolfberries (hong zao and goji), as well as some Indian dried spices, Thai bird chiles, galangal - and coca-cola! (I substituted dark beer with a little white sugar for the latter, per another recommendation I found online). I have no idea whether this sort of preparation is normal in mainland China. And the quantity of dark soy sauce was off the map. But it was certainly delicious.

 

I've eaten black chicken stew or soup at restaurants and have found the flavor and texture full and rich - sort of like double chicken. I will definitely be making this again, probably in a simpler style.

 

That is one weird recipe. I'm not sure what you are referring to as "Indian" spices. The spices listed are all widely available in China (Guangxi, where I live, produces 85% of the world's star anise, for example.) Cardamoms in China refers to 'black cardamoms' (cao guo). If the dish had a Chinese origin, which seems likely, I'd guess that is what was used. The jujubes and wolfberries are very common with silkies.

The biggest difficulty for me would be the Spanish onion.We usually only get red onions around here, but coincidentally one of the supermarkets had white onions today. Only the second time I've seen them in 20 years! Galangal can be difficult, too. It sometimes turns up.

 

The cooking of chicken in Coca Cola was a big fad a few years back. I believe it originated in Hong Kong or Taiwan then spread to the mainland. But I haven't encountered it for a while*. Actually, it was a lot better than it sounded or I expected.

The amount of soy sauce is bizarre.

I love your description of the silkies as "double chicken". That is spot on. Intense chicken flavour. I've only ever had or seen it in soups here, but they have all been rich and full as you describe.

* Edit. About an hour after I wrote about not having come across Coca Cola chicken for a while, a friend who is tentatively learning to cook sent me a message that she had just made it and was surprised by her success. 


Edited by liuzhou, 28 November 2013 - 02:15 AM.

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#534 C. sapidus

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 05:10 AM

Thirteen for Thanksgiving this year. More food than pictures, so I am probably forgetting some of the food.

 

Mrs. C made babaghanoush (eggplant smoke-grilled on the Big Green Egg), chicken liver and cashew pate, cranberry sauce, stuffing with mushrooms, grilled salmon with soy-maple glaze, and the turkey. More about the turkey anon.

 

Our neighbor is starting a catering business, so she provided mac and cheese, pear salad with blue cheese and raspberry dressing, buttery rolls, pumpkin pie, and a fantastic curried butternut squash soup. Friends and family provided mashed potatoes, salad, cookies, chocolate cake, and strawberry trifle.

 

I was in charge of vegetables, and made creamy braised Brussels sprouts, green bean salad, braised shallot confit, stir-fried bok choy with fermented black beans and garlic (a special request), and Bourbon sweet potatoes with orange sauce (sweet potatoes smoke-grilled on the Egg) . My favorite was the braised shallot confit, browned in butter, flamed with cognac, and then cooked down with red wine and fresh thyme.

 

Younger son, to my surprise, went straight for the Brussels sprouts when he got hungry again after dinner.  :shock:

 

Grown-up drinks included beer, wine, hard cider, and dark & stormys.

 

The star of the show was Mrs. C’s turkey. She brined it overnight, iced the breasts, put Cajun butter under the skin, and then cooked it on the Big Green Egg with cherry wood for smoke. Best turkey I have ever eaten, with the possible exception of the practice turkey she made a few days ago.

 

The picture does not do justice to this juicy, smoky fowl.

 

p29646248-4.jpg


Edited by C. sapidus, 29 November 2013 - 05:11 AM.

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#535 Morkai

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 11:13 AM

Could you provide a little more detail about "icing the breasts"? I think I understand, but not completely. 



#536 C. sapidus

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 11:37 AM

Could you provide a little more detail about "icing the breasts"? I think I understand, but not completely. 

 

From Harold McGee, via NPR's Terry Gross:

 

MCGEE: Take the bird out ahead of time and let the legs warm up a little bit while you keep the breasts covered with ice packs. That way, you keep the breasts cold. The legs warm up by maybe 10, 20 degrees, and that way, when you put the bird in the oven, you've already built in a temperature differential. The breasts are going to end up, at a given time, less-cooked than the legs. And that's exactly what you want.

 

 

I hope that helps. Mrs. C used ice cubes in plastic baggies.


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#537 gfweb

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 11:39 AM

Dinner table before being stormed by hungry guests.  Menu: SV Turkey breast (140F), roasted dark meat (155F), turkey stock gravy, cranberry onion conserve, au gratin yukon golds, braised kale, red cabbage braised in apple juice , mashed yams (allspice, brown sugar and liquid smoke), corn bread with and without jalapenos, stuffing.

 

A good time was had by all.

Attached Images

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#538 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 11:54 AM

I celebrated Thanksgiving with the rest of the Canadians back in October, so dinner last night was just simple chicken fingers.

 

ChickenFingers.jpg


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#539 rotuts

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 12:02 PM

when i used to do whole roast turkey, I used the McGee trick right after I heard about it.  works well. take your time with it.



#540 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 01:46 PM

Thirteen for Thanksgiving this year. More food than pictures, so I am probably forgetting some of the food.

 

Mrs. C made babaghanoush (eggplant smoke-grilled on the Big Green Egg), chicken liver and cashew pate, cranberry sauce, stuffing with mushrooms, grilled salmon with soy-maple glaze, and the turkey. More about the turkey anon.

 

Our neighbor is starting a catering business, so she provided mac and cheese, pear salad with blue cheese and raspberry dressing, buttery rolls, pumpkin pie, and a fantastic curried butternut squash soup. Friends and family provided mashed potatoes, salad, cookies, chocolate cake, and strawberry trifle.

 

I was in charge of vegetables, and made creamy braised Brussels sprouts, green bean salad, braised shallot confit, stir-fried bok choy with fermented black beans and garlic (a special request), and Bourbon sweet potatoes with orange sauce (sweet potatoes smoke-grilled on the Egg) . My favorite was the braised shallot confit, browned in butter, flamed with cognac, and then cooked down with red wine and fresh thyme.

 

Younger son, to my surprise, went straight for the Brussels sprouts when he got hungry again after dinner.  :shock:

 

Grown-up drinks included beer, wine, hard cider, and dark & stormys.

 

The star of the show was Mrs. C’s turkey. She brined it overnight, iced the breasts, put Cajun butter under the skin, and then cooked it on the Big Green Egg with cherry wood for smoke. Best turkey I have ever eaten, with the possible exception of the practice turkey she made a few days ago.

 

The picture does not do justice to this juicy, smoky fowl.

 

p29646248-4.jpg

 

Can you provide more details on the smoking process? I've been meaning to cook a turkey in my hot smoker for ages.


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