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Aerated Chocolate?


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7 replies to this topic

#1 jfresch

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 04:00 PM

I saw a recipe somewhere for orange flavored aerated chocolate. Does anyone have a clue where the recipe is from or how to do it? I know you charge the chocolate in an iSi. Any other aerated chocolate recipes?

#2 Baselerd

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 04:14 PM

There's a few topics around about this, but:

" I believe that the correct technique for aerated chocolate is 1 lb chocolate + 6 Tbsp neutral oil (grapeseed). Melt it all in a pot and homogenize, then let liquid cool to about 85 F. Next, pressurize in an ISI whip with 2-3 canisters of N2O. Dispense it into a vacuum container (example) and pull a vacuum, placing it in the freezer until set. If you don't have the vacuum container, you can still try but the result will be a lot denser - although still less dense than the chocolate alone. This is the best technique I have tried, uses a lot of inspiration from the Eleven Madison Park cookbook."

If you don't have a vacuum container make sure the container you dispense into is already frozen, and get it into the freezer as quickly as possible. The foam will start collapsing as soon as its dispensed.

If you want to make it orange flavored then I would use any of the standard techniques of infusing the oil or chocolate. Another option would be to add spray dried orange powder.

Edited by Baselerd, 18 December 2012 - 04:16 PM.


#3 jfresch

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 04:54 PM

There's a few topics around about this, but:

" I believe that the correct technique for aerated chocolate is 1 lb chocolate + 6 Tbsp neutral oil (grapeseed). Melt it all in a pot and homogenize, then let liquid cool to about 85 F. Next, pressurize in an ISI whip with 2-3 canisters of N2O. Dispense it into a vacuum container (example) and pull a vacuum, placing it in the freezer until set. If you don't have the vacuum container, you can still try but the result will be a lot denser - although still less dense than the chocolate alone. This is the best technique I have tried, uses a lot of inspiration from the Eleven Madison Park cookbook."

If you don't have a vacuum container make sure the container you dispense into is already frozen, and get it into the freezer as quickly as possible. The foam will start collapsing as soon as its dispensed.

If you want to make it orange flavored then I would use any of the standard techniques of infusing the oil or chocolate. Another option would be to add spray dried orange powder.


So you would just infuse grapseed oil with the orange zest? How do you infuse chocolate?

#4 dhardy123

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 05:00 PM

I have made aerated chocolates alot.

You must temper the chocolate first and then add 10% of a warmed neutral flavored oil and mix it in well. You can also add orange oil at this point (or peppermint oil, etc) to taste.
While tempering the chocolate, I sit the iSi whipper in a sink of water halfway up the bottle at around 26-28C to warm it. Pour the chocolate/oil mixture into it and give it 2 canisters of N2O. I shake it a few times and place it back in the sink water for around 15 minutes. This should keep the chocolate in temper if the water is not too hot or cold.

I then dispense the chocolate into molds that have been shelled. The good thing with this method is that because the chocolate is tempered, you don't need to apply a bottom. I have also siphoned it into silicone molds without shelling, and between caramel rulers and cut them into squares. Of course you can also make an "Aero" type chocolate bar with the appropriate mold. Here is a picture of how they turned out (green shell/peppermint flavor)
aero1.jpg

Edited by dhardy123, 18 December 2012 - 05:10 PM.


#5 Baselerd

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 05:04 PM

I would add an essential oil or tincture to the chocolate. I've never heard of infusing the chocolate straight up - maybe someone else could answer that...

#6 Mjx

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 12:36 AM

I'd go with a flavouring oil, as others have suggested, and I've used very finely grated rind, too.

I've also experimented with adding a little citric acid, to incorporate citrus's tartness, which you don't get from a flavouring oil (err on the side of too little, rather than too much, and keep notes). Citric acid doesn't dissolve into the chocolate, but remains distinct crystals. I made lime and clove truffles some time back, and the result was great: the tiny, scattered sparkles of tartness melt on the tongue a bilt more slowly than the chocolate itself, and really offset the scent of the lime.

In Elements of Dessert, the recipe for aerated (aka 'bubble') chocolate calls for 400 g oil/2 kg dark chocolate (4 lb 6.4 oz/14.11 oz).

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#7 Tri2Cook

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 04:27 AM

You must temper the chocolate first


I'm going to disagree on that one. After comparing results using tempered and untempered chocolate, I've never bothered. I didn't see any benefit in the final result that supported it being necessary. In addition, I had increased incidents of the cooler chocolate being cooled further when the gas was added and plugging the outlet of the whipper. I'm not saying you shouldn't do it if you prefer, I'm just saying it's not a "must".
It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#8 dhardy123

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 03:20 PM


You must temper the chocolate first


I'm going to disagree on that one. After comparing results using tempered and untempered chocolate, I've never bothered. I didn't see any benefit in the final result that supported it being necessary. In addition, I had increased incidents of the cooler chocolate being cooled further when the gas was added and plugging the outlet of the whipper. I'm not saying you shouldn't do it if you prefer, I'm just saying it's not a "must".


You could be right. I've always tempered it because I don't bottom the molds. Not sure how the bottom would be if it wasnt tempered...