Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Lunch! What'd ya have? (2012–2014)


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
549 replies to this topic

#151 hongda

hongda
  • participating member
  • 111 posts

Posted 11 February 2013 - 09:10 AM

Sounds like a Northern Chinese tradition

http://en.wikipedia....Tangyuan_(food)

#152 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 11 February 2013 - 09:14 AM

One of the dishes I had for lunch yesterday: Whole red snapper done in a modified "cheong ching" style. ["醬蒸"; "sauce steamed"] The fish was marinated w/ sesame oil, Shaohsing wine, grated ginger, chopped garlic, chopped scallions; then steamed only partially, all the steaming accoutrements and steaming juices removed, the fish returned to the steaming dish and covered w/ the "cheong" and steaming resumed/completed, the fish replated on a nice deep plate and strewn w/ chopped cilantro & sliced scallions.

The "cheong" was formed by sautéeing chopped garlic, grated ginger & chopped de-seeded hot long green chilli in peanut + veggie oil, salted yellow bean paste (whole soybeans) added and sautéed; then a mix of [tomato paste (I used Heinz ketchup), sugar, dark soy sauce, some Worcestershire sauce, 3 "fresh" sour plums (hand-shredded, pits added in) and diluted w/ a little water] added in and the whole stirred and simmered for maybe 5-10 minutes or so then held aside before using on the fish.

DSCN7699a_1k.jpg

Edited by huiray, 11 February 2013 - 09:27 AM.


#153 Dejah

Dejah
  • participating member
  • 3,265 posts
  • Location:Brandon, Manitoba

Posted 11 February 2013 - 04:15 PM

huiray: I've had students from various places in China, and they've all had tong yuen, but not in a savoury combination. They have all had the sweet version, and some have had ones filled with sweet bean paste or black sesame seed paste. I see them sold pre-made, dried or frozen.

Took a big container of my savoury tong yuen to school for my students from Lauyang and Beijing. All enjoyed it, but all mentioned the sweet version. I think it's maybe more common to have the meat filled jiaozi dumplings for CNY. In Guongdong province, specially Toisan county, the savoury version for NYD, the sweet version for NYE - so said my Mom. :smile: And I, being the obedient daughter, followed the tradition...
Dejah
www.hillmanweb.com

#154 Dejah

Dejah
  • participating member
  • 3,265 posts
  • Location:Brandon, Manitoba

Posted 11 February 2013 - 06:42 PM

Interesting info' on the URL posted by hongda. I always thought northern CHinese preferred the sweet version, and the southern preferred the savoury!

Well, I'm a savoury kind of person, so THERE!
Dejah
www.hillmanweb.com

#155 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 11 February 2013 - 07:02 PM

Interesting info. I looked up "tangyuen" [湯圓] also.

I still don't remember eating it or being served it during CNY day. It's possible I might have seen it around at Chap Goh Meh. Or at the winter solstice festival, but my family and relatives seldom gathered to celebrate that. I don't remember seeing it around at my Grandfather's place too when we gathered for CNY at the time, but then again maybe I've blocked out memories of it? (My father's family came from Canton proper)

Edited by huiray, 11 February 2013 - 07:05 PM.


#156 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 11 February 2013 - 08:58 PM

A variation of Yeung Chow fried rice for lunch today.
Chinese celery, peas, "Char Siu", Chinese long beans, shrimp, plain omelette.
Eaten w/ pickled chopped hot long chillies.

DSCN7705a_1k.jpg


Ingredients mise-en-place:

DSCN7704c_1k.jpg

#157 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 4,695 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 12 February 2013 - 07:15 AM

I dont know about the Chinese celery, but the rest looks tasty. Guess its time to get back on the Fried Rice Band wagon.

do you peel those Saus. first?

#158 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 12 February 2013 - 07:52 AM

rotuts, if you don't like normal (Western) celery then I guess you would like Chinese celery even less. :-)

I sometimes do a very simple fried rice with chopped up (Western) celery and eggs scrambled in the rice in situ, just oil, no garlic, no spices, nothing else except maybe a little salt and even then usually not. This gives a very "clean-tasting" (to me) stripped down fried rice which particularly appeals to me when I am very tired or under the weather.

"saus."? I guess you mean Chinese sausage? (lap cheong) I didn't use it here - but when I do use lap cheong in fried rice, I don't bother skinning it. I might soften it by steaming beforehand, though, but I have also simply sliced it up and fried it in the oil a bit before adding the other stuff (in a suitable sequence).

#159 Paul Bacino

Paul Bacino
  • participating member
  • 1,137 posts
  • Location:Bennington Nebraska USA

Posted 12 February 2013 - 02:21 PM

A more traditional plating of gumbo!! Happy Mardi Gras!!

8467876867_28208b230d_h.jpg
Its good to have Morels

#160 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 12 February 2013 - 11:23 PM

• A modified “Sayur Asem” – sliced shallots & garlic cloves, sautéed in oil; then added: cabbage, Chinese long beans, shallots, baby maize, zucchini/squash, peanuts, fried firm tofu [equivalent of "tauhu"], spice mix [Cap Ibu “Bumbu Sayur Asem”], tamarind concentrate [Dragonfly brand], sour shrimp paste [Golden Boy], crushed “gula melaka”, simmered till done.
• Nasi lemak – Basmati cooked w/ coconut milk, pandan leaves [previously frozen] & a little salt. (Nasi “Basmati” dimasak dengan santan, daun pandan dan sedikit garam)
• Deep-fried “Ikan Bilis” [whole anchovies]; plus some celery as well, as "garnishes".

DSCN7709b_1k.jpg

#161 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 12 February 2013 - 11:27 PM

Looks good, Paul B.
(I forgot it was Mardi Gras! I was thinking of the day as "Chor Sam" [the third day] of Chinese New Year instead. :blush: )

#162 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 8,866 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 13 February 2013 - 09:23 AM

DSCN0939.jpg

Kimchi jigea for me today. No suitable pork cuts so I made some pork meatballs - very satisfactory.

#163 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 13 February 2013 - 10:27 PM

Lunch on Wednesday:

• Fried rice w/ Western celery & eggs scrambled in situ. No spices, no salt, nothing else except just the oil used. :-) [This one is for you, rotuts, following on from what I described 2 days ago: http://egullet.org/p1908862]
• Yesterday's modified "Sayur Asem", boosted w/ some rice vinegar, fresh chopped white cabbage, fresh cut long green chillies, sliced cod pieces, and a good squeeze of fresh lime juice as well. I liked this further modification better than yesterday's.

DSCN7714a_1k.jpg

DSCN7716c_1k.jpg

#164 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 4,695 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 14 February 2013 - 06:37 AM

Western celery ??? Chinese celery ??? :wacko:

:raz:

#165 liuzhou

liuzhou
  • participating member
  • 1,659 posts
  • Location:Liuzhou, Guangxi, China

Posted 14 February 2013 - 07:36 AM

Western celery ??? Chinese celery ???


Yes. Two different (but related) plants.

Chinese celery (Mandarin: 芹菜 qín cài) is thinner and has hollow stems. It is somewhat stronger in taste than Western celery (西芹 xī qín, literally "west celery") and is almost always cooked. It is usually sold with a head of leaves, too. Stems and leaves are both used in soups and stir fries.

Both celery types are widely available in China.

Chinese celery.jpg
Chinese celery - 芹菜

celery.jpg
Western Celery - 西芹

Edited by liuzhou, 14 February 2013 - 08:34 AM.


#166 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 4,695 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:00 AM

texturally both to me are :wacko:

but I use the leaves.

#167 naguere

naguere
  • participating member
  • 417 posts

Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:17 AM

Interestingly, (for me anyway) , at certain times in England we can buy 'Dirty Celery', this is with mud on and no attempt has been made to blanch the stems during cultivation. This gives you a stronger taste and would be used in cooking., As a bit of fun, take a branch of celery (clean) and dip it in to sugar, the taste will surprise you !

Edited by naguere, 14 February 2013 - 08:28 AM.

Who cares how time progresses..

Today I am drinking ale.

(Edgar Allen Poe)

#168 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 14 February 2013 - 07:20 PM

• Pan-fried thick-cut pork chop w/ fried onions & Cipriani tagliarelle tossed w/ plain mushrooms sautéed in the pan sauces.
• Salad of red-leaf lettuce, Napa cabbage heart, parsley & cherub tomatoes [thanks for the tip, Paul Bacino]; tossed w/ olive oil, 8-year balsamic, black pepper & salt.

DSCN7729a_1k.jpg

DSCN7731a_1k.jpg

#169 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 16 February 2013 - 09:12 PM

"Yee Sang" [魚生] (Google images) for lunch on "Yun Yat" [人日; "Everyone's Birthday"], today, the seventh day of the Chinese New Year 15-day celebrations.

This is a salad of various shredded raw vegetables (& a few cooked) with raw fish & add-ins, tossed w/ a plum sauce. Today I used daikon, jicama, cucumber, deep-fried turnip (died green & red), carrot, all shredded; oroblanco segments, membranes removed & flesh broken into chunks; pickled ginger; sliced pickled scallion bulbs; cilantro leaves; sliced sushi-grade raw tuna & salmon; with crushed peanuts (two kinds), toasted sesame seeds, ground white pepper, five-spice powder, deep-fried wonton skin strips, and generous freshly squeezed lime juice as the add-ins. The dressing was plum sauce w/ sesame oil, fresh lime juice, and a bit of water.

The larger disks seen alongside the fried wonton skin strips in the photo were prawn crackers & crab crackers which were kept on the side and munched along with eating the tossed salad.

I've shown previous renditions of the dish on the salad thread and touched on the possible origins of it also.

Photos of the Yee Sang all laid out, and after putting everything together and tossing.

DSCN7735a_1k.jpg

DSCN7738a_1k.jpg

#170 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 18 February 2013 - 09:24 PM

Lunch on Sunday: 

Salmon & tuna soup; w/ chunks of Chinese fuzzy squash, julienned daikon & jicama, glass/cellophane noodles and chopped scallions & cilantro in a chicken broth. 

 

DSCN7740a_1k.jpg  

 

 

 



#171 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 18 February 2013 - 09:38 PM

Lunch on Monday: 

 

• Wontons w/ a filling of a mixture of minced pork, chopped scallions & cilantro, chopped rehydrated thick-cap shiitake mushrooms ("far koo"), ground white pepper, dash of fish sauce & soy sauce, and some beaten egg. In a chicken stock soup w/ Taiwanese-type (Napa) cabbage [see pic - this is the long, more skinny, less green-leaf parts type of "Napa" cabbage ("Wong Nga Pak")]. 

• "Kon Lo Mein" using skinny wonton noodles, dressed w/ a sauce of [(minced pork marinated w/ Red Boat fish sauce, MRT ryori-shu, Honteri mirin, sesame oil, white pepper, thick dark soy sauce) sautéed w/ chopped garlic, chopped shallots & sliced long hot green chillies], garnished w/ cilantro. 

 

DSCN7748a_1k.jpg  

 

DSCN7751a_1k.jpg  

 

 

 

Pics of the cabbage & the uncooked wontons: 

 

DSCN7743a_1k.jpg  

 

DSCN7745a_1k.jpg  

 



#172 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 4,695 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 19 February 2013 - 05:04 AM

wow.   stunning as usual!



#173 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 19 February 2013 - 07:23 AM

Thanks, rotuts.



#174 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 4,695 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 19 February 2013 - 07:40 AM

re:  ground pork.

 

Id never buy ground pork in the supermarket.  way too much fat.

 

what cuts do you use if you make your own?   Shoulder?



#175 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 19 February 2013 - 07:48 AM

I usually just get the stuff from supermarkets or, more frequently, from the Chinese grocery I go to.  I don't mind the fat in it (in fact, I rather like it that way*) and the stuff from my Chinese grocery is more "porky" than what I get from Marsh or Krogers (supermarket chains).

 

*ETA: Not for everything, of course. If it is visually too fatty that day for my purposes I pass it by.


Edited by huiray, 19 February 2013 - 08:02 AM.


#176 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 19 February 2013 - 09:26 PM

Late lunch Tuesday:  

 

Beef & veggie "stew".  Beef short ribs (meat sliced) browned in veggie oil w/ garlic tossed in at the end, then simmered w/ water, sea salt, bay leaves, some chopped shallots for ~ 1+ hr.  Chunked ribeye then added, followed by carrot chunks (scrubbed, skin-on), Western celery [de-stringed] & halved small red potatoes (scrubbed, skin-on); then mainly-whole small shallots & Mexican oregano.**  Simmered for a while more till done. Seasoning adjusted. 

 

Eaten w/ white Basmati rice. 

 

Ribeye steak that had been left around in the fridge just a little too long for my taste to cook as a nice medium-rare steak. 

 

**See here, here, and here

 

DSCN7757a_1k.jpg  


Edited by huiray, 19 February 2013 - 10:13 PM.


#177 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 20 February 2013 - 01:25 PM

re:  ground pork.

 

Id never buy ground pork in the supermarket.  way too much fat.

 

what cuts do you use if you make your own?   Shoulder?

 

BTW, the Chinese do have specific cuts of pork and beef, etc - they just don't correspond to Western/UK/USA standardized cuts.  In my experience, many Chinese folks also like a fair bit of fat in their pork - it contributes to the deliciousness. Pork shoulder, for that matter, is a less-preferred cut of pork for many Chinese customers insofar as I know.  It's tends to be on the lean side.  It is also frequently up to the customer to tell the butcher what sort of cut he/she wants and the butcher chops out the requested part; or the customer just selects what he/she wants from pre-cut meat.  Western-style "pork chops", for example, is not really a "Chinese cut".  British Colonial Hainanese cooks, OTOH, would know exactly what "pork chops" were. 

 

Here are some links for your interest: 

http-::www.thebraiser.com:chris-cosentino-swastika-pork-you:

http-::www.youtube.com:watch?feature=player_embedded&v=XO2eORaG2yU

http-::www.forumosa.com:taiwan:viewtopic.php?f=98&t=95929

http-::www.porkytorky.com:2012:06:hohhot-meat-markets.html

http-::www.thebeijinger.com:forum:2008:01:15:Cuts-of-Beef-in-Chinese

http-::www.yelp.com:biz:bayard-meat-market-new-york


Edited by huiray, 20 February 2013 - 01:42 PM.


#178 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 21 February 2013 - 11:37 PM

Lunch on Wednesday:

• Soup of chicken broth with snow fungus, chopped scallions & cilantro, and celery heart & leaves.

• Chinese BBQ pork (store-bought) with white rice (Hom Mali).

• Long-stemmed (Chinese-type) spinach blanched in oiled hot water, drizzled w/ oyster sauce & dusted w/ ground black pepper.

 

DSCN7761a_1k.jpg

 

 

 

 

Lunch on Thursday:

• Soup of short-cut pork spare ribs sautéed w/ a bit of garlic & ginger then simmered w/ water, small thick-cap "flower pattern" shiitake mushrooms ("Far Koo"; 花菇) & sea salt; sliced daikon added, simmered a while more, loads of ground white pepper added and simmered to finish off.  The soup is nicely "hot"/peppery.

• Simple stir-fry/sauté of zucchini sticks w/ a head of garlic (individual cloves well-smashed but unchopped) & sea salt. Eaten w/ white rice (Hom Mali).

 

DSCN7770a_1k.jpg

 



#179 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 1,396 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 22 February 2013 - 11:49 AM

"Yee Sang" [魚生] (Google images) for lunch on "Yun Yat" [人日; "Everyone's Birthday"], today, the seventh day of the Chinese New Year 15-day celebrations.

This is a salad of various shredded raw vegetables (& a few cooked) with raw fish & add-ins, tossed w/ a plum sauce. Today I used daikon, jicama, cucumber, deep-fried turnip (died green & red), carrot, all shredded; oroblanco segments, membranes removed & flesh broken into chunks; pickled ginger; sliced pickled scallion bulbs; cilantro leaves; sliced sushi-grade raw tuna & salmon; with crushed peanuts (two kinds), toasted sesame seeds, ground white pepper, five-spice powder, deep-fried wonton skin strips, and generous freshly squeezed lime juice as the add-ins. The dressing was plum sauce w/ sesame oil, fresh lime juice, and a bit of water.

The larger disks seen alongside the fried wonton skin strips in the photo were prawn crackers & crab crackers which were kept on the side and munched along with eating the tossed salad.

I've shown previous renditions of the dish on the salad thread and touched on the possible origins of it also.

Photos of the Yee Sang all laid out, and after putting everything together and tossing.

attachicon.gifDSCN7735a_1k.jpg

attachicon.gifDSCN7738a_1k.jpg

 

Looks like I made an error in the list of ingredients - I used TARO, not turnip, dyed green and red then deep fried.



#180 Paul Bacino

Paul Bacino
  • participating member
  • 1,137 posts
  • Location:Bennington Nebraska USA

Posted 22 February 2013 - 01:30 PM

I fused chopped ( seasoned with Pike's Place fish seasoning ) Salmon and Northern Pike Belly together with Activia Rm Binder to make my Lenten Sandwich!! Side of Pickled jalapeno

 

The meyo is sirracha/ pickled jalapeno/ dill  !!

 

8498779870_f7b953d1a6_h.jpg


Edited by Paul Bacino, 22 February 2013 - 01:31 PM.

Its good to have Morels