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boudin noir

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About boudin noir

  • Birthday 02/22/1938

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  1. eG Cook-Off 76: Consider the Schnitzel

    That looks like the kind of schnitzel I want to make.
  2. eG Cook-Off 76: Consider the Schnitzel

    It has been my belief that "schnitzel" should be very thin; 1/8-1/4 inch thick. Much of what I see in the photos is much thicker. Am I wrong?
  3. When do you over tip?

    I tip over 20% almost all the time. The few extra dollars mean little to me but much more to the server.
  4. spatchcocking fowl

    I have difficulty spatchcocking birds ( chickens and ducks ) using kitchen shears, chefs knives and cleavers. My hand hurts from shears and the bird is usually a mess whichever weapon I use. I recently saw on Amazon garden pruning shears that could cut through a 3/4 inch branch. I bought them. (I often use non-cooking stuff when I'm cooking.) They are great. They cut through the birds with little effort and the birds look as intended.
  5. eG Cook-Off 76: Consider the Schnitzel

    Most of the recipes I've seen for schnitzels of all sorts of meat have called for pounding to appropriate thickness. I've had restaurant schnitzels that are thinner than 1/4 inch. I guess they might have slicing machines that can slice that thin, but then why do the recipes call for pounding if it is ineffectual.
  6. eG Cook-Off 76: Consider the Schnitzel

    My problem with schnitzel is thickness. I start with thin ( 1/4 inch ) pork chops. I then pound them down to about 1/8 inch. I flour, egg, bread crumb and fry. They quickly thicken back to their previous thickness as they cook. How do I prevent this?
  7. Cooking. N.Y. Times

    I use the Times food site and find it to be very useful. Well worth getting the Times and for any cook looking for a vast library of recipes a great resource.
  8. I find that I don't use very much cookbooks written by authors who also have big name restaurants ( with a few exceptions ). I am keeping mostly classics. I get many recipes online and find that I can get most of what I need.
  9. Breakfast! 2017 (Part 2)

    I'm not sure that photo whets my appetite.
  10. I'm not sure this is the answer to all of your problems but: 1 Water has the highest specific heat, i.e it will take more calories to raise the temp. 1 degree in water than other liquids such as the fat in milk and pastry cream. 2 If air is incorporated into the liquid as would be more likely in milk and pastry cream it would take even more calories to raise the temp 1 degree, therefore more time. However it should take the same amount of time to raise the temp. 1 degree in the same volume of the same liquid every time. All of these assume the same starting temp. and volume.
  11. Overnight Oats

    I do it in the morning. Before you make your coffee mix your rolled oats yogurt and milk with what ever enhancement you prefer and when your coffee is ready he oats will be chewy and not soggy.
  12. Will be going to morocco in a few weeks. Any restaurant recommendations for Casablanca and Tangier?
  13. I have been using pure lemongrass oil which is easy to find on the internet. It is very potent . I dip the tip of a metal skewer into the oil and the into the dish. An ounce will last a lifetime.
  14. Cured nasturtiums

    I have a few nasturtium plants growing and would like to cure them to use like capers. Most of the recipes I have seen suggest brining and the storing in vinegar. Since I don't have an abundence of plants the seeds will come in waves and I was wondering if I could just store them in salt as they come in or if I must brine each batch and then vinegar them?